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ATLAS 

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■•^SA^^TA- CLARA CO. 




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1876. 



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Foroi No. 37-5M J-M 



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PEEFACE. 



The people of Santa Clara Connty Imve vory generously auppoi-ted ub in the 
publication of tills Historical Atlas, and it has been our moat eincere wisli and 
conscientious aim to make it not only a fair equivalent for the money it lias cost 
tbem, but at the same time a work wliieb they may feel proud in showing to 
tbe many people lybo yearly visit the County in search of health, pleasure, or 
profit, and ask for such information as we have fried to condense within its pages. 
It is the first work of tho kind ever attempted on the Pacific Coast, and He pros- 
ecution has been attended with many difficulties unforeseen by us in the beginniog. 
The irregular sun-cys and intricate subdivisions of land, combined with Its uneven 
topography, has made it much more difficult and expensive than any other County 
we ever attempted. Yetwc are pleased to acknowledge that the enviable reputa- 
tion for public spirit and enterprise that the people of Santa Clara County enjoy 
in other communities has boon found by us to bo weU sustained. Had it been 
otherwise our undertaking must have failed for want of that support which we 
can only expect among prosperous and intelligent people. 

It is not free fi-om errors. Few pei-sons without actual experience can compre- 
liend the details of such a work ; its cost, and the care aud pains necessary to 
bring it to completion. "Wo have spared neither money nor labor to make it as 
nearly perfect as possible, and do not believe that a reasonable public can magnify 
the few errors that crept in into any importance. 

Our thanks are due to many individuals in the County for material assistance 
rendered us in prosecuting tiie work. Our limited space forbids us enumerating 
all such favors, but we would acknowledge our obligations to Messrs. A. T- & 
Charles Herrmann, Surveyors and Civil Enginoera, San Jos^. The thorough 



knowledge of the County, its lands, divisions, and topographical features possessed 
by these gentlemen, and derived from actual field work as surveyors and en- 
gineers, has been freely placed at our disposal ; also, the maps, plats, fiold-notes 
of actual surveys, etc., on file in their office, Imve been of incalculable advantage 
and value to us, and have enabled us to make a much more perfect work thau we 
could otherwise have done. 

In this connection we will mention the names of J. Comb, present County 
Surveyor, and J. H. Piper, City Engineer of San Jo^6. These gentlemen have 
freely given iis what asaistunce their positions enabled them to. 

On behalf of Mr. H. S. Foote, of San JcaC-, the gentleman who has conducted 
the Historical Department of the Atlas, we wish to return our thanks to many 
public and private individuals for facU and figures, besides much other informa- 
tion that they have given us, and which could not have been gotten from any 
written records. We arc also -indebted to Mr. Fred. Hdl for many historical 
fucU gleaned from his IiLstory of San Josi!. 

Our acknowledgments are also due to the honorable Board of Supervisors for 
their high appreciation of our work, and the encouragement they gave it; to the 
County officials, who have at all times aided us in gathering such facta 'as were 
necessary from the records ; to the Press for their cordial encouragement and 
support of our enterprise; and to our numerous subscribers throughout the 
County for their liberal patronage. 

Wo send it forth confidently believing that it will be received as the most com- 
plete and valuable Compendium of County Information ever published on the 
Pacific Coast. 



SAPS. 

PAOE 

Sintoof Cnlifornifl ""i ' 

County Miip, coloreil by Maps, as given in this work 6 

" " colored by Tuwnsliips ^8 

Farm llnp Number Ono 20, 21 

■■ ' ■' Two 24,25 

Throe 28,29 

" " " Four 82, 83 

II II II Five 8G, 37 

Sis 88 

II 11 -I Sovcn 66, 57 

" " " Eiglit 60, CI 

I' II I' Nino 64, C6 

" ■! "Inn 76 

" " " Elevun 68, 69 

II " II Twelve ' . 7i 



CITY, TOWN, AMB VILIiAGE PI^ATS* 



Pueblo aoSnnJosfi (1781) 28 

Pir,'t WiirJ, Cily of Sun Joi6 89 

Second Wiird, City of Sun Josi 40 

Third Ward, Cily of Ban 3oii 41 

FourUi Wiird, Cily of Sim Jostj 42 

Siinta Clurn 43 

Gilroy 07 

Alviso 20 

Sliiyn.dd 20 

Mouiituin View 20 

Suriitogti 32 

Evergreen 82 

Santu Clnru Homestead AsEOciation 32 

Los Quloa 64 

Lexington 64 

Pojitur Cily (Bird's-oyo view) 72, 73 



VIEWS AK» ILLUSTRATIONS, 



Almaden Mines 76, 77 

Arguullo, J. K., Uesidenco of 47 

Arquea' Block g2 

Aiizerais House and Purk . , 80 

Ayrshire Farm g2 

Blink of Sun Jas6 23 

Bull, Petur, Keeidonee of 98 

Buscom, Dr. L. H., " . . . , , 53 

Beans, T. Ellard, '■ ...'.*!!! 78 

Bradley, E. L., " gj 

Breyfogle, Dr. C. W., " and Office of 66 

Briggs, George II., " . ■ , . 103 

Brown, J. E., . " .... ing 

Bubb, Benjamin F., " . nj 

Bubb, W. H., II ' ' ' ' _' ■ ,^ 

Campbell, Benjamin, " SB 

Carter, J. S., " -.-... 30 

Oliapman & Davis (Bird'a-oye view of Poplar City) . , . . 72 73 
Cheney, Jpssn, Ecsidencoof , . ' nq 

Chew,Alfr<.d, [ ] \ [ j^J 

Clayton, James A., " , . 

College, Nolro Duino ■ . . ' " 48 4<) 

" Sanla Chirn ' ' 44' 4fi 

" University of IhoPaeific ' ' .„ 

" Vinsonhaler's Business . . ' rr 

County Hospilfll .'.".'* g^ 

Cimnty Court House " 

Coutls, Peter, Residencoof. . . 

Daugherty, W. P., " . . 

De Saisset, Pedro, " . 100 

Doerr, Philipp, " , ' '''' 

Dornbcrger, L., " . . ' ' ^^ 

EnrTght, Joseph, Engine ^ 

Evans, J. L , lU-sidcncc of ^ 

Fallon, Thomas, " ^2 

Fox, Bernard, ■. n„a ^^^^ry '■'.'.'. \ [] ^^ 



Fredricksburg Brewery 26 

Frink. Daniol, llosidoneo of 70 

Goodrich, L., Slono Quarry 59 

Graves, Silvester, Bosidcnce of 95 

Hagnn, James, Block .80 

Ilninea, N. J., Residence of 75 

Unll.TiVm. B., '• 81 

Hurgis, W. F., " 09 

Harwood, D. M., Lono Hill Vineyard 102 

Ilatman & Norniadin, Cnrriogo Fnctory CI) 

licnsluj- Hou^e Block 81 

Hensley Honiestoud 78 

Uerman, Adam, Residence of gg 

Hester (Inle) C. P., ■' 02 

Hillebrant, Peter, " 90 

Hobbs, 0. X., " 31 

Hunlor, A. B., " 8-1 

Infirmary of Santa Clara County 22 

Jamison, S. I., Residonco of 83 

Jenkens, Kvnii, " 70 

JoncB &. B'?ardon, Livory Stable 80 

Keith, P. G., Besideneo of 07 

Keystone Safety Gas Machine 00 

Knos Block 6i 

Knox, Jlrs. Sarah L,, Reaidonco of 5& 

Laphani, C. II., 
Lonzen, TbcoJoro, 
iMaddox. Mr. and Mrs. C. H., 
Slesscrsniith, John, 
Slurphy, B O., 



76 
103 



94 

. 100 

Notre Dame College 48 49 

Ogier, J. H., Residence of ....,.,.. . 102 

Pacific Congress Springs 80 87 

Pnino, John, Livery Sluble gj 

Parker, L. F., Kesidenco of - . 53 

Poplar City 72, 73 

Puinam, S. N., Rcsidenco of iq^ 

Quinii, William, " 92 

Rea IJloik, jQg 

Rutker, J. E., Residence of JQ3 

Sage, L. A., PuciQc Congress Springs 80 87 

San Jote Brewery .......,., gg 

Sanla Clara College 44 45 

Sciiallenhergcr, M., Besidence of jqj 

Schools, Head Bireel, San Joso jq 

" Sanla Clara Slreel, San J056 5Q 

" First Ward, San Jose gj 

" Fourth Ward, San Josd gj 

Smith, Charles C. & F. J., Besidence of 88 

Smith, E. 0., ■■ ..... 69 

Snyder, John, " -„ 

Spring Block '3' 

Stockton, N. H ' -i 

St. James' Holel ' .-. 

St. Joseph's Church (Catholic) ! ' 93 

Tanlau, M., Residence of " ' 80 

TL-imniit, John, "... 

Tuck, Prof. J. n. L., " . . ] ' ' ' ' " * 

University of the Pacific 

Van Syckies, Henry, Residence of 

Vinsonhaler's Business College 

>Vade, Charlea E , Residence of . 

Walker, Robert, " .....' 

Wallis, Mrs. Sarah, " 

Walkins, B. F., ■• . . 

"WHlkin-s & Scoii, Agricultural Worfca . . , . ' ' 
"Welden, W. H., Residence of 

Wellor, J. R.| 1. 

AVilliams, D. & T., ■' ..',''*'*' 

Winslow, "William, " 

"Wolf, 51., II . . ' ' ' ■ 
TVright, "William, " .' .' 



63 
34 
46 
91 
60 
85 
98 
90 
CS 
81 
03 
85 
69 
81 
SO 
104 



MISGELLANJEOirs, 



Historical 

StaliHlieal . . . '. ■ ■ . 9 lo 16 

Patrons' Counlv Djrectorv 101 to 181- 

— : ^ • ■■■■■- 106 to 110 





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HISTORY OF SANTA CLARA COUNTY, CALIFORNIA. 



BOUNDARIES. 

TiiK boiiiicliiriM of Santit Ularn Cmitily, us iltHnf^d by Die act or tlio 
Lngislotiiro Rslobliabing llic snmo, uru as follows: Uegiiining ol ft point 
tJppoBilo llic moiilli ijf tliuSnn Franuisquilu Crook, being the cf>mmon cor- 
nor of Aliimeiln, Sun Mtitco, anJ Siinl« Cliirn Counties j Ibonoo caslerly to 
u [lOint ot tbolienil oF n -fKiUgli, whifli is iin nrm of tlie liny of Sim Frun- 
ciscOQlits bond, making inlo llnjmninliiriil in front of iboGegarii ranches; 
tlicnce I'iistorly to a lonosycnmoro-lrco, llmt stands in a ravine between 
llie dwellings of Fliihonciii and Viiluntino Gegara; Ihcnco cnslerly (ip 
siiid ravine lo the top of the niounlaina, n.s surveyed by Homco A. Higloy ; 
thence on it ilireet line cnalerly to the common corner of Siin Jonquin, 
Staniahiim, Alamoda, and gantu CInrn Counties, on the summit of tho 
Uoiifil Itiingo; thence Bouthedsturly, fdilowing the annimitor the Coast 
Itnrige to tho norlliciwt corner of Monleruy County ; tlionce westerly, fol- 
lowing tho northern bonadiiry of Monterey County t" the southonst cor- 
ner of Santa Oriij! County; tht-nco northwesterly, following the summit 
of the Suntn CrUK Slountaiua lo the bend of Snn Francisquito Creek; 
thoncu down anid creuk to ita mouth ; Ihonco in n direct lino to the plauo 
of beginning. Conlnlning about thirteen hundred square miles. Since 
the net cstabliBhing tho boundaries of Siiulii Oliirn County, granite mon- 
uments have been sot along its northern Hue, dividing it from Aliimeda 
County. On the south Snn Benito County, carved oul of the onstern 
portion of Monterey Counly, hiis been created, but, willi tho e.tception 
of nnniea, the southern boundary has not been changed. Tho eastern 
line, dividing Santa Clara from Stimislaua County, liaa never been exactly 
flxed, tho topography of tlio conntry not permitting the actual applica- 
tion of engineering iiielrumeuLs. This uncertainty renders it impossible 
to give tho exact area of tho County, but the llgures above stated m.iy bo 
cnnsidored as an accurate eslimale. The County contains, at the present 
time, nine political townships, to wit: Almaden, Alviso, Burnett, Fre- 
mont, Ollroy, Milpilas, Bcdwood, San Josfi, and Santa Clara, 

The terms " Santa Clara County" and " Santa Clara Valley" arc often 
mod as compreliendinK the same territory. This is a mistake, as tho 
Santa Clara Valley extends beyond the limits of tho Counly, while the 
County contains a large area that does nut properly belong to tho valley. 
Tlio jjrincipal and best jiortion of tiie valley, however, belongs to the 
t^ounty. 

DESCRIPTION OF SURFACE, TIMBER, ETC, 

Tbo Santa CUira Valley runs through the centre of tho County from 
north to south, and obtains its greatest width, about fifteen miles, when 
at ban Joso. On the east are tlic mountains of the Coast liange, wooded 
on their highest olovationB and interspersed with numerous suiiiU valleys 
and canons, which aflord arable and graining land. On the west lies tho 
Santa Crnz Itange, monntaiiiB of a more nigged character, but still 
abounding with spots of soil of uneqnaled fertility. These two ranges, 
at a distance of about twelvo miles south of San Josf, approadi to wiLhin 
three miles of eaeli other, hut si:c miles farther on they again recede to a 
distance of about six miles. A refereneo to the nuips will give the exact 
location of these mountains. "Within the limits of the Counly the highest 
elevation of tho Coast Range is Mount Hamilton, four tliousand four hun- 
dred and forty-eight feet high, and of the Santa Cruz Range, Mounts 
Chonal and Bnelio, respectively tiiroo thousand live hundred and thirty 
and three thousand four hundred and thirty feot high. 

The timherof tlie wcitern rungo is principally redwood, which fur- 
iiislios a snperior lumber in almost inexhaustible quantities. Oak and 
niadrona also abound. The timber of tho western range consists mostly 
of scattering groves of oak, but not of n character or quantity to servo 
any purpose but for fuel. 

PRINCIPAL STREAMS. 

Tho princijinl streams of tho County are tho Coyoto, Guadalupe, Los 
Gatos, Ijlagus, Uvas, and I'oniloncia. A reforcuco to tho map will give 
tho location of these iva tor- courses. 

EARLY HISTORY. 

"Wo havo thus far spoken of our subject as a County, hut its existence 
as a Coimty dates only from 18130, while tho history of civilization within 
it^ limits is a hundred years oid, and counts ita beginning from tho linio 
of tho cslabliabnient of the mission at Santa Clara, in 1777. 

Trcvious lo that time the County was inhabited by a Iriho of Indians 
called the (JIhonos or Coatanes, who appear to havo lived as savages usu- 
ally do, on spontaneous fruits and what they could secure by hunting and 
fishing. California was considered a portion of Mexico and subject to 
Spain, which, at the lime referred lo, was under the rule of Charles IV. 
In Kovomber, 177G, Father Pefia, a Franciscan prie.st, visited this valley 
for tho purpose of establishing one of those missions which were tho 
pioneers of civiliKalion of the New World. The site soloclcd was at 
what is now the town of Simla Clara, and on the I2lh day of January, 
1777, a cross wils raised, an altar was creeled, the first mass was said 
by Father Tomas de la Pefia, and the mission was established, — although 
the formal eoremonies did nol Uike place until six days after. The object 
of these missions was, on the pari of the clergy, to Christianize and 
civilizo tho Indians, leaching Ibom agriculture and snch other arU and 



indiwtries as would make them useful citizens, while their souls were to ; 
bo roflcuod by Inciilcaling a disposilion to pious observances. Tho good 
Fathers seem to have found a very tractable set of pupils in tho Indians 
of this valloy, as wo havo no record of any refistiinco lo their cHbrls on 
tho part of tho natives, and tho work appears to havo gone on smoothly, 
except when, now and then, tho civil or niililary anthoritios thought 
they could do better than tho church in tho work of civilization. 

About this lime the Spani-h governmont came to the concln-ion that 
Upper California might he made to yield somo revenue to (bo crown, and 
fallowing out the idea, began to offer inducomonts to soldiers and settlers 
who would locate in those portions of the territory set apart for that pur- 
pose. Theao inducements consisled of monthly pay, stock and agricul- 
tural implcmonU, and grants of land. 

ESTABLISHMENT OF THE PUEBLO OF SAN 
JOSfi. 

The Governor of Upper California, Don Felipe Neve, had recom- 
mended lo tho King of Spain, through the Viceroy of Mexico, us a snit- 
ablo site for a puoblo a point on tho Guadalupe Iliver, three-quarters of n 
league from the mission of Santa Clara, and at tbo same time asked au- 
thority to make the location. It seems that no immedinlo reply was re- 
turned to this communication, and tbo Governor occupying an isolated 
position, and nut desiring t<j he do]icndenl on uncertain communication 
with the city of Mexico for subsiatence, resolved to osluhlreh tho town, and 
lake chances of his acU being confirmed. He thought it would ho a good 
thing to cstnblish a colony in this rich valley, which would be able to fur- 
nish not only supplie-^i to tbo forces at tho presidio at San Francisco, but 
also lo add soiucthing to the royal rcvonuc. This, ho thought, would be 
a suiBcienl oxcuse for nctini; without orders. Accordingly ho directed 
Don Josf' Jloragn, then Lieutenant Commanding at San Francisco, to 
take from bis command nlno eoldicra and two settlors, and three others, 
who woro to he picked up for this special duty, and proceed to this valloy. 
On tho 20th of November, 1777, Lieutenant Moragn and his band went 
into camp on the Guadalupe at the point designated, and announced the 
camp as a Pueblo, calling it .San Josu dc Guadalupe. The action of the 
Governor in establishing tho Pueblo without wailing for orders was sub- 
sequently confirmed. 

Ill 1783, Don Pedro Fages being Governor of Calirornia, an oflicial 
division of real estate was mado among tbo nine founders of tbo Pueblo, 
ft bouse lot and foursnertc-s of land for cultivation being given to each. 
Tho names of the founders, aa deicrihcd in tho report of distribution, were 
Ignacio Archuleta, Manuel QonKidcs, Jose Tiburcio VasquoK, Manuel 
Amcaquila, Antonio Romero, Bornado Rosnles, Francisco Avila, Sebas- 
tian Alvitrc, and ClaudioAlvires. Afac-simileof the original plat, show- 
ing the division lines, appears in another part of this work. Tho Pueblo 
" originally was four square leagues, and all the lands not distributed were 
lo bo used in common for pasturage. la 17112, Vancouver visited the mis- 
sion and the Pueblo, and we learn from his report that at that time the 
eelllors cultivated wheal, maiiic, pons, and boaiis, that they plowed with 
inferior plows, turned the soil once over, then smoothed tho same down 
with a harrow; and in tho months of November and December they 
sowed wheat in drills or broadcast on the even surface, and seralehed it in 
with a harrow. Oats and barley they did not cullivato. 

Tho original site of the Puoblo was about a mile and a quarter north 
of tho present centre of the city, but owing to tho luwness of the land, 
which was often submerged in tho winlor-time from the overfiowing of 
the Guadalupe Biver, permission was a.skcd, and obtained, to move the 
location to the higher ground on the south. According to Frederic Hall, 
Ui whoso excellent work, "The History of Snn Jose and Surroundings," 
wo are indebted for many facts and figures, the removal was accomplished 
in 1797, tho central point of the new location being near tho corner of 
Market and San Fernando StrceU. About this time a dispute arose be- 
tweon the Fathers at tho mission and the people at the Pueblo as to tho 
line dividing Iheir respective settlements. After several appeals lo the 
city of Mexico, the lino was finally tixed half-way between the two. From 
the correspondence incident lo this dispute, wo learn that at this lime 
tho mission hold fourlcca hundred and thicly-four Christians, and that 
there were in the surrounding rancbcrias four thousand Gentile Indians. 
In 1783 the town-house of tho Pueblo, or, as it was called, tbo Juzgado, 
was built. It was located at what is now tho northwest corner of Market 
and El Dorado Streets, and rouiainod until 1350, when it was pulled 
down. It was an adobe building, one story high, and with three rooms, 
which were used rcapeclivcly as Alcalde's room, court-room, and jail. 

Tho beautiful Alameda, considered uno of the most charming drives in 
Ibo world, was laid oul by the Ealhers at the mission in 1709, Father 
Maguin do Cnlala being tho projector of the work. Ho planted tho linos 
of trees, now so venerable, and employed two hundred Indians to water 
and protect them until Ihey wore largo enough to withstand tho asijaults 
of tho eattlo that then roamed al largo all over the country. He also 
built tho road, thus aH'ording Ibo peojde of the Puoblo pleasant traveling 
to the mie.sion to attend religious services, there being at that time no 
chapel in San Jose. In 1803 the first chapel was erected in tho Pueblo, 
the same being located at the corner of Market and San Fernando Slreota, 
whoro tho Catholic church now stands. It remained until 1836. 



II was but a. 'short time after tho scttlomenl of Ibo Puchlo before the fer- 
tility of the soil began to demon.itralo ilself, yielding tho richest harve?!* 
on Ibe slightest provocation. "\Vo find, within six years after Iho planting 
of the orchards, that the production of fruit was so largo that it defied 
consumption in its natutnl state. Tho idea naturally occurred lo the 
people that some of it could be mado use of in the manufacture of spirit- 
uous liquor. This, however, could nol bo done without consent from Ibo 
eomnmndant of tho province. Wo find that on the lOtb "f August, lail'i, 
permission was granted lo one Manuel Uiguorra to nuikc one barrel of 
peach brandy. Thin was probably tho first lot manufactured in this 
County, as wo lake it for granted that Manuel avnilod himself of this 
permission. 

The first public school thai we have any report from was established in 
1811, Rafael Villaviceneio, who is dc'cribcd iis an "infirm corporal," 
being tho loauher. Rafael was to teach the children of tho Pueblo to 
read, write, and the Doctrine, and was (fl receivo for his Borviocs eighteen 
rcules per annum from each head of family, to be paid in grain or flour. 
One of the conditions prc^eribod by tho decree cslabliahing this school 
was, that during the time tho children were at school their fathers were 
to he exempt from rosponsibility to God on their account, tho teacher 
assuming this responsibility as part of his contract. 

EARLY SETTLERS. 

Up lo this lime tho settlers had been oithor Spaniards or Mexicans, 
and nearly if not all had been recruited under the regulations prescribed 
by the Spanish government, when tho Pueblo was first established, Tho 
first foreigner, of whom we have any account, who settled in this valloy 
was John Gilroy. He was not only the first foreign settler in tho Santa 
Clara Valley, but in California. He was a Scolehmnn, and landed al 
Monterey in 18U from a ship belonging to tho Hudson Bay Company. 
Ho was ill of the scurvy and wa-s left on shore lo he cured. Thence ho 
found his way into this valley and became a permanent sotfler. Ho 
nnirriod into the Ortega family, and settled on the Ranche San Ysidro, n 
short distance cast from the city which now boars his name. He accumu- 
lated vast properly in lands and herds, hut finally, in 1869, died in nbso- 
luto want. 

Robott Livermore came lo the Puoblo in 1816, hut was only hero for a 
short lime. BU final selllomcnt was about twenty miles norUicast of 
San Josu, in tho valley which now bears his name. 

Prior to the year 1820 this valley had no commercial importance. 
Nothing scarcely wa.'; sold. The principal business was agriculture, and 
whatever was accumulated was in the shape of herds and lands. Al that 
lime there was nol a vehicle in tho valley Ihal had wheels wilb spokes, 
nor was there a foot of sawed lumbor in tho country. Stoves and firc- 
jdaces in the houses were not known until 1816. Neither was there a 
fiouring-raill in all this region. In 1920 a Iraflic in bides and tuUow 
began lo grow up, which assumed some importance. 

In 1822 a severe earthquake occurred, which is represented by Irndi- 
tions lo have caused considerable injury to life and property. Among 
other stories is one to the effect that it destroyed the church at Santa 
Clara. This appears to havo been an exaggeration. It cracked and in- 
jured tho walls, but did not destroy tho church. 

In 1821 the Mexicans achieved independence from Spain; but tho 
change of rulers created no particular Bxcilcment among the colonies of 
California. Up to December, 1828, there had been 8273 baptisms, 2376 
nmrriascfl, and dJOS deaths recorded at tho mission al Santa CIiith. 

The first census or enumeration of inhabitanU of which wo bavo any 
knowledge was in 1881. At that lime there were at the Puoblo ICfi men, 
Uj woin'en, 103 boys, 110 girls, making a total of 521. The crops raised 
that year wore 2000 bushels of wheal, 2000 bushels of corn, and about SOO 
bushels of beans. The stock numbered 4-li3 head of eattlo, 238G head of 
horses, and 134 mules. Tho average prico of o mulo or aaddlo-horse was 
ten dollars; an ox or cow, five dollars; and a shoop, two dollars. Tho 
chief business was raiding cattle for their hides and tallow. They also 
found a ready market for their grain, which was principally purchased 
by the Russian Fur Company, at about two dollars and twenty-fivo cenU 
per bushel. 

After 1830 tho number of foreigners began to increase, their whole 
number at that time being estimated at about seventy. John Burton, 
afterwards Alcalde, came in that year. Harry Bee arrived in 1828. 
William Gulnae, J. Alex. Forbes, and James Weeks, camo in 1833. 
Thomas Doak, William Welch, Nicolas Dodera, Matthew Fallon, Wil- 
liam Smith, Ephraim Fravcl, Thomas Pepper, and an American called 
Bill, were hero in 1833, but tho date of their arrival is not known. 

Thomas Brown, William Daly, and Georgo Ferguson came in 183-1. 
In 1835 Ibo Pueblo did nol contain more than forty dwellings, including 
houses and hula of all kinds. 

Wo liavc no record of any event of special importance locally from 
1835 to 184U. Tho growth of tho country in population was slow, there 
being at tho mission of Santa Clara, in November, about eighty women 
and children, twenty-five men, and about half a dozen boys nearly grown. 
The foreign immigration from 1833 lo 1810 was about as follows: 
In 1838, Henry Woods and Lawrence Carmichael ; in 1811, Charles 
Webor, Josiah Bolden, Grovo C. Cook, PoUir Springer, William Wig- 



10 

gins, Henry Pitta, and .iBraei Ilocfc ; in 1848, Pelcr DnvidEon ; in 1644, 
Thomas Fallon, Julius Martin and family, Thomas J. Shudden and 
family, Mr, Bennett and family. Captain Stephens, Dr. Join Towusend 
and wife, Allen Montgomory and wife, Martin Murphy, Sr., with his 
wife, live sona, and two daughters (two of his sons, Slartin and James, 

bringing tbeir families), Jaa. Millor and wife, Matthew Harlin, 

OnWin, Jos. Foster, John, Michael, and Miss Sullivan, Oliver Magnet, 

^;Hitchoock and family, Patrick Martin, Sr., and two sons, Moses 

Scb alien berger. Thomas Hudson, and John Conncrs. The party with 
which Martin Murphy came was the first thai ever suttcedcd in bring- 
ing wagons across the mountains. Many had tried, but all had failed, 
and had been forced to abandon their teams. In 1845 about twenty 
new arrivals were noted, among whom wero Frank Lightston, "Win. R. 
Baasbom, John Daubenbiss, and James Stokes. In 1846 there was quite 
a rush to this valley. "Wo note among the arrivals this year, Ifianc Brnn- 
ham, Chas. Wiite, Zachariah Jones, Wm. McCulcheon, Jas. F. Eeed, 
Joseph Aram, Jacob D. Hoppo, Wm. Daniels, George Donner, William 
and Thomas Campball, Potor Quivoy, Edward Fyle, Thos. Koll, S. K. 
Moullrio, S. Q. Broughton, and Dr. Isabell, nearly all of whom brought 
Ihoir familic!; with them. Those who came with Wm. McCutcheon, Jiis. 
F. Heed, and Georga Donner constituted the famous Donner jinrly, 
whose sufferings in the mountains make such n sad chapter in the history 
o( this coast. This party was caught by the snow near Donner's Luke, 
and were unable to force their way out, and for months they lay in the 
mountains exposed to hunger and cold. They soon consumed Ibeir 
stores, including the draught animals, and many of the men, women, and 
children perished of starvation. Of tho largo number that constituted 
the company, but a mere handful was left when they wore brought out 
in tho spring by a party from this aide, Mr, Wm. McCutcheon, wo be- 
lieve, is the only survivor of this party, who was n man grown at tho 
time this horrible experience was had. A number of tho children who 
were nursed through that winter have grown to man- and womanhood, 
and are now residing in San Jos6. 

The llrst flouring-miU erected in this valley was built by Pedro Sanse- 
vain, on Iho Guadalupe. It was a primitive affair, of no great capacity, 
but was a great improvement on the Indian raorlar, or the hand mill, 
which had previously been used. 

MEXICAN "WAR. 

The trouble between the United States and Meiico began to make itself 
felt in this valley in 1846, at the time General Fremont camo into tho 
country. Fio Pico, who was then Qnvarnor of California, hated the 
Americans with true Moiican cordiality. The grounds of his hatred, 
which he enumerated in May of this year in his address to tho Depart- 
mental Assembly, will seem peculiar when read in the light of the expe- 
rience of to-day. Ho said, " Wo find ourselves threatened by hordea of 
Yankee immigrants who have already begun to flock into our country, 
and whose progress wo cannot arrest. Already have tho wagons of that 
perfidious people scaled the almost inaccessible summits of tho Sierra 
N'ovada, crossed the entire continent, and penetrated tlio fruitful Valley 
of Sacramento. What that astonishing people will next undertake I 
cannot say ; but in whatever enterprise they embark they will bo sdre to 
ho flucoessful. Already these adventurous voyagers, spreading themselves 
over a country that seems to suit their taster, are cultivating farms, estab- 
lishing vineyards, erecting saw-mills, sawing up lumber, and doing a 
thousand other things that seem natural to them." 

The celebrated " Bear Flag" was raised at Sonoma on the 14th of June, 
and the Americans declared Calirornia to be independent and free from 
Mexican rule. General Josu Castro, commander of tho Mexican troops, 
then had his headquarters at Santa Clara. He issued a proclamation 
calling on the Mexicans to rally and wipe out the invaders, at the same 
time promising protection to tho lives and property of thoao foreigners 
who stayed at home and did not aid or comfort tho Americans, 

Captain Thomas Fallon, then a resident of Santa Cruz, crossed tho 
mountains in the night, and camo into this valley with twenty-two men, 
intending to capture the Punblo in the name of tho United States. Hear- 
ing, however, thot Castro, with about three hundred men, was on the 
alert, he withdrew his camp, which was about four miles and a half south 
of San JosS. 

On the 7th of July, Commodore Sloat raised the United Slates flag over 
Monterey, and issued nn address, in which was recounted the recent de- 
feat of General Arista by General Taylor. This nows was conveyed to 
Castro, who immediately gave up the fight and left tho country. Captain 
Fallon, who was watching Castro's movomenls, came into San Josu with 
a force of thirty-one men on the lllh of July, took possession of tho Juz- 
gado, and compelled the Alcalde to deliver up the archives. At that 
time there was not a single United States flag in tho valley, but Captain 
Fallon procured one from San Francisco, and on tho 13th he hoisted the 
stars and stripes over the court-house. Captain FoUon then left to join 
Fremont, but before going away he delivered the keys of the archives to 
Mr, James Stokes, who had been appointed magistrate. 

During the remainder of 1846 the Pueblo was in fact n military camp, 
and the whole valley was a scene of war, but of rather a mild form com- 
pared to more modern campaignH. Two companies wore formed, one 
consisting of thirty-three men, with Charles Weber as captain, and John 
M. Murphy as lieutenant. This company was stationed in San Joso, 
having their quarters in an adobe building on Lightston Street, Tho 
other company was under tho command of Joseph Aram, and was quar- 
tered at Santa Clara. There was no regularly organised Mexican force 
in the field, but one Francisco Sanchez hud collected a body of about 
three hundred mounted Californians, and was roaming tho valley. Lieu- 
tenant Pinckney, of tho United States ship ■' Savannah," was sent to San 
Josii with sixty marines. Ho fortified tho Juzgodo, and made prepara- 
tions to resist an expected attack by largely superior numbers. No con- 
flict was had, however, until December. About the 8th of that month 
Sanchez captured Ave men near the Seventeen-Mile House, among whom 
was Martin Corcoran, afterwards a prominent citizen of San Jos6, and 
now proprietor of tho Cameron House, at Santa Clara. On tho Sflth of 
December, hearing that Sanchez was between San JosC and San Fran- 



Cisco, Captain Weber started with his company to give him battle. After 
reaching a point near what is now the San Mateo County line, U wi« 
ascertained that the enemy had gone eastward into the Calaveras Valley. 
Captain Weber pushed on to San Francisco, and procured a reinforco- 
mont of ohout twenty marines and n small aix-pound gun from one of tho 
United Stales vessels, and then returned in tho pursuit of Sanchez. In the 
mean time the laltor bad relurned from tho Calaveras and demanaed the 
surrender of San Josu. Lieutenant Pinckney refused, and after Sancher, 
had circled round the town ho came to the conclusion not to attack, and 
withdrew his men. Captain Weber's company, returning from Sun 
Francisco, came in sight of HancbcK's forces about twelve miles north of 
San Jose, and immediately pressed forward to attack. Sanchez, however, 
commenced to retreat, and it was not until they reached the grove be- 
tween what is now Milliken's Corners and Lawrence Station, that they 
could got within rifle-range. Sanchez's troojis, although well mounted 
and superior in number, wore armed in a very unique manner. Some 
had sworda,somo guns, and some lances. Captain Weber opened on 
them with tho little cannon, but after a few discharges the gun was 
thrown by tho recoil from its carriage, and buried in the mud, and was 
of no further nm. A brisk musket Are was ke|.t up on both sides, San- 
chez all the time refusing to come to close quarters, and finally retreating 
at full speed towards the Santa Cruz mountains. The enemy lost four 
killed and five wounded. On Captain Weber's side only two were 
wounded. Aftor this the Americans received reinforcements (rom vnriouH 
quarters, and on tho 8th of January, 1847, Sanchez surrendered his wholo 
force, including the prisoners he had captured near the Soventeon-JIilo 
House, and this ended the war between Americans and Mexicans in 
California. 

EARLY AMERICAN GOVERNMENT. 

California, under Mexican rule, was culled a Department, and was di- 
vided into three Districts, Santa Clara County being in the Second. Tho 
chief magistrate of the Pueblo was called an Alcalde. Tho first Alcalde 
of San Jos6 was Antonio Maria Pico, who was appointed in 1845. In 
I84G, Dolores Paobeco was Alcalde, but was captured by Thomas Fallon, 
who turned tho office over to James Stokes. There was no superior tri- 
bunal in California at that lime, nor wero there any courts of the first 
instance in San Josi until they were established by American authority 
in 1840. Justice woa dispensed in a very primitive manner, and without 
regard to legi^ technicalities. There being a lack of prisons, summary 
penalties were imposed. These penalties were indicted with considerable 
discrimination. Indian culprits were flogged, and other criminals fined 
for ordinary offenses, and occasionally a term of service in the chain-gang 
was awarded. John Burton, who was Alcalde in 184G-7, held a court of 
unique character, if wo are to judge by the records which he loft. Ho 
was a man of little education, and if his judgments lacked legal sym- 
metry they certainly struck at the bottom of the diiBeulties he was called 
upon to adjudicate. We have not space for the peculiar decisions ren- 
dered by him, but give as a sample the case of Juan Scsaldo vi. Maria de 
las Naves. Tho plaintiff thinks tho defendant, his wife, is about to ab- 
scond, and desires that sho shall be brought into court and explain why she 
will not live with him. After hearing the testimony, Burton decided 
that the parties should ho again united, and if they refused they should 
be imprisoned until they consented to live together. The defendant re- 
fused to comply with tho Alcadc'a judgment, and was sent to jail. It is 
unfortunate that no record is found to enlighten posterity as to the final 
result of tho imprisonment, as it would be interesting to know how long 
the woman's pluck held out. Burton, however, came to tho conclusion 
that the responsibility of tho judicial office was too much for one pair of 
shoulders, and he, therefore, in December, 1846, of his own motion, ap- 
poiutcd a Council to try cases, the persons so appointed being Antonio' 
Sunol, Dolores Pncheco, Jose Noriega, Feliz Buclna, Salvador Castro, 
William Fisher, Isaac Branham, Grovo C. Cook, Mr. White, Captain 
Hanks, and William Weeks. The people never to our knowledge raised 
the question as to Burton's authority to appoint this committee, but sub- 
mitted their cases to the Council with as little hesitation as though it had 
been created by a formal constitution. 

In 184T tho town site of San Josi^, or Pueblo \ots as they wero called, 
wero surveyed, and the limila of the town fixed nt Julian Street on the 
north, Eighth Street on the cast, Itecd Street on tho south, and Market 
Street on tho west. Washington Square, the place where the Normal 
School building is now located, was also laid out. In the same year J. D. 
Button surveyed the outside Pueblo lands into flvc-hundred-acro lots, 
which wero divided by lot among the heads of families. 

In this year Mr. Benjamin Campbell began the erection of tho first 
Baw-niill built in this County. It was located obout three miles above 
Saratoga, on what is now known as Campbell's Creek. Tho limbers for 
this mill ho sawed out by hand with a whi])-saw. The mill, however, was 
not completed and ready for work until tho following year. At this lime 
improvements were gradually odvancing in all portions of the County. 
Mr. Zachariah Jones opened a hotel in the old adobe building just east 
of Market Square, and called it the Half Moon. There wero three stores 
in the city nt this time,— one kept by Weber and Lightston, on what is 
now called LigbUlon Alloy, one by Peter Davidson, and ono by Antonio 
Sunol. The principal articles of trade wore hides and tallow. And it is 
said that the level country between tho town and the Eastern Foothills 
was literally strewn with the whitened bones of slaughtered cattle. 

The discovery of gold in 1818 caused great excitement in Santa Clara 
County, and people of nil degrees left their crops in tho ground and went 
to the mines. Some of them were successful, but many others were not. 

Among those who had tho most marked success in gold-hunting was 
John Murphy, he having on hand at one time about two million dollars' 
worth of gold. There was but little coin in the country at that day, and 
gold-dust was used as a substitute, it passing current at four dollars per 
ounce, about twcnty-flvo per cent, of its intrinsic value. Among others 
who made n good thing out of tho mines wore Dr. Ben Cory, 0. M. AVohor, 
James F. Becd, Dan Murphy, and Doctor Isabell. 

The rush to the mines caused the crops of that year to remain un- 
harvcsted, and provisions consequently roso to almost fabulous jirices. 



Flour sold at twenty dollars per barrel, and other article? ia proportion 
During this year Zachariah Jones completed n saw-mill „a Loa Qtuia 
Creek. It appears that lumber was exceedingly valuable nt thi» time 
the mero cost of hauling it from Campbell's or Jones's mills being one 
hundred dollars per thousand. 

In December, 1848, the first snow fell in this valley. In this year ihc 
first brick houses wore built in San Josf, — one by Mr. Osbom, at the cer- 
ncr of Fifth and St, John Streets, one between St, Jamca and St. John 
on Fifth, and one on St. John Street, between Fourth and Fifi]) i,, 
1849, many of tho gold-huntera had returned from the minea, and Ihc 
influx of new immigration made things lively in and around the Pushio 
Tho houses were few, many of the people living in tents sot up along tho 
lines of the strceta. Flour advanced to fifty dollars per horrel, A hair 
of boots was worth from sixteen to thirty-two dollars. Crime inercaicd 
and executions wore numorouB, but tho County throve notwitlutonding. 

SAN JOS£ AS CAPITAL OF CALIFORNIA. 

In November, 1849, tho Constitution of the State was adopted and 
San Jos6 was named as the location of tho State capital. The Aiittnla- 
mieniti or Town Coiincil proposed to purchase a large iidubo house, Waled 
on the south half of Lot I, Block 1, Bango 1 south, on tho cast side of 
Market Square, for the use of the Lcgislnture. This house was built by 
Sninsevain & Bochon fur a hotel, and they proposed to rent it for the ii<!d 
of tho State for four thousand dollars per njonth. The Town Council 
which had agreed to furnish suitable buildings for the Slate |irovidcd the 
capital was located in San Jose, thought it more economical to purchoi^ 
the building. The price asked was Ihirty-four thousand dollars ; but the 
city lacked tho necessary funds, and tho owners wero unwilling to lake 
the Pueblo authorities for security. Accordingly, a note for that amount 
bearing eight per cent, interest per month was oiecnted by H. M. May, 
James F. Becd, Peter Quivey, J. D. Hoppe, J. C. Cobb, K. U. Dimiek, 
Ben Cory, W. H. Eddy, G. C, Cook, Isaac Bninham, P. Sainscs'oin, I'eler 
Davidson, William McCutcheon, Joseph Aram, David Dickey, Charlej 
White, F. Lightston, and B. C. Keys, and a deed of Ihe premises was 
made to Messrs. Aram, Belden, and Bced, in trust for the purchases to bo 
conveyed to the Pueblo whenever it should pay for the same. It was 
from this purchase that the so-called " Forty Thieves" litigatinn origi- 
nated. After the removal of the capital from Sun Joeu, the city author- 
ities sold the building occupied by the Legislature to the County for 
thirty-eight thousand dollars, the purchaac-monoy to be applied to the 
liquidation of the note above referred to. It appears tliul tliis money 
was not so applied, and the trustees above named sued the city lo oLlniu 
the foreclosure of a mortgage executed to them by tho Town Council ia 
1860, to secure the purchase price of the property used by Ibe State. A 
decree of foreclosure was obtained, the Pueblo binds were sold, and bid 
in by the trustees of the plaintiff. Under this sale the piaintiOs. who hod 
organized themselves into a land company, claimed title lo all IhePiicblu 
lands. This claim was resisted by the Pueblo authorities, and was the 
source of long years of litigation. 

The first Legislature of the State of California convened in Sm Soti 
on the 15th of December, 1849. A good deal of dissatisfaction was ex- 
pressed at the occommodations offered hy the city, and a bill was offered 
providing for the immediate removal of the State capital lo Mooteri'V, 
but it was laid over. Thia winter was a lively one for San Jose if all the 
traditions are Iruo. Tho Legislature was known as the " Legislature of 
a thousand drinks." Tho people of Sau Jose were hospitable, white tho 
difl'erent candidates for the United States Senate kept open house. 

The State was divided into Judicial Districts in Siarch, 1850, and 
Santa Clara County placed in the Third District, John H. Wal=oa being 
elected Judge. The first cause tried in this court was that of Clemciile 
Pi^naud vs. Ramon Hurlado, Antonio Laman, Francisco BaIlc=Ieros, and 
Joaquin Bennetez, and was an action to oblain Iho foreclosure given |o 
secure tho payment of five thousand dollars, with interat at eight per 
cent, per month. " 

Tho principnl in-door amusement at this time was the fandango, while 
the out-door sport consisted mainly of bull and bear fights, which wcru 
hold either on Market Plaiwi or St. James's Square. Tho first Fourth of 
July after the adoption of the Constitution w.is celebrated in San Joie 
in good style. William Voorbies delivered an oration in English, Jamci 
Jonea one in Spanish, and a Mr. Sanford read the Deehiratioa of Inde- 
pendence. Quite a number of murders were committed in this County 
during this year. We have not room for details, but have prepiirud a 
list of the exccutiona which have occurred, which list will Iw f'"""' 
farther on. 

During 1850 two stage lines were put on tho road between San Jo.'i- 
and San Francisco, ono by Ackley & Morrison, and ono by John W. 
Whistman, tho fare being thirty-two dollars, or, as the orthodoi finan- 
cial expression of that time would have it, " two ounce.=."' In tho winttr 
of 1850-1, the roads became so bad that theso lines were withdrawn and 
the travel to San Francisco went via Alviso, connecting at tho Inllvr 
point with tho steamers "William Robinson" and "New Star." 

The first court-house under the American rule was buill in IS&O, on 
First Street, a little south of Sanln Ciarn Street, and opposite Fonnlam 
Alley. The old Juigndo waa lorn down during this year, and tho ndol«s 
of which it was composed wont into tho construction of the fine ndobo 
building, built by John Hoppo, on the norlbeost corner of Market and 
Santa Clara Streets. 

The second session of tho Legislature met on the tith of January, ISo.. 
By this tinio other towns wanted Ihe Slate capital, and there was no end 
of scheming fur its possession. Notwithstanding "H lluit San Jos.'could 
do, Vallejo carried ofi' the prize. Tho act of removal wn.- |iassed Febru- 
ary 14, 1852. In March, 1854, the question ns to the legality of this 
removal was presented to the Supremo Court in lh« shnpc of a writ U- 
construe the Act of Itomovai. A majority of tho Courl, Justices He.v- 
denfoll and Wells, decided that tho capital of tho Slate was legally in 
San Jose. On tho strength of this decision a writ of mandale iras i>.-u«i, 
out of the Third District Court, against all the Slate officers, cnuiiiand- 
ing them lo reiiiovo their offices to San Josu, or show cause why they 
should not do 50. After hearing tho argumunl Iho Court sualaiiiwl Uio 



wril, holding that San 3o*5 wm the capital of the Stat«. An appeal j 
rr'jni tbi' (leoiiion wiis luken lo the Supreme Cuurt. In tbe mean timo 
.runliev Wella had died, nnJ his place on the bench wo* occupied by Jus- 
tii'o Jtrj'unt. On Ihii appeal the Supreme Court, Justice Hojdenrcit dia- 
seiiting, (lecidod Ihul San Job6 was nut the capital of the State. Not- 
wilbBlanding this decieion, the poplu of Sun Jose still think thai they 
wero illegally deprived of the capital, and some of them hrive hopes that 
it will agaio bo sont back Ui thom. 

COUNTY ORGANIZATION. 

The organization of Santa Clrira County occurred in 18G1, and its 
jrovornnient vested in what is known at the Court of Sessions, presided 
over by the County iludge and two asioeiatcrj, clinscn from the Justieca of 
lliu Ptiteu of the County. A complete list of County Judges, Afsocinlcs, 
Supervisors, etc., will bo foimd In one of the tables on anatbor page of 
liii^ wcirk. The bounduricd llrit established included that territory 
known iiH Wfuihiiigton Township, in Alameda County, but in 18C3, when 
Aliimeda County was created, tbia part was cut off from Santa Olura. 
T)iis was agalnHl the wiahos of the BCttlcrB, who have not yet bccomo 
I'r'euriciled to tbe change. 

i<'rom ISfjI, when Santa Clara v/m made a county, «ho began to take 
(HI 11 bu'inesrt nopect, and from that date may be counted hur aubstantial 
growth. Immigration had swelled her population to about six thousand, 
iind peoplo who originally camo ivith nejutuntion of staying beyond a few 
months or yeara, began to consider it a |ierinancnt reaidonco and to found 
hiiines. The growtli of the County from thai time to tbo present will bo 
understood by a rofcronco to the croji stulistics presented elBQwhcro in 
tliii work. 

The cholera llrsl made itt appearance In this valley in 1869, and proved 
fiilnl to (juitu a number of the Iiidhuifl and Mexicans, but only a few of 
the white population died. Thla wa.^ atae ita last appearance in this 
County. In Ihia year the old Bella Union building, located on Santa 
Clara Street, was used as a court-house. It was moved from thero to 
Ihu uld Slale-Uoufo in 18')3, but tbo latter building having burned down, 
lliu huilding now known aa the What Cheer House, at the corner of Sec- 
ond and Sau Fernando Streets, waa purchased and made the Capitol of the 
County. 

Two events occurred in 1853 that created considerable oxcilcmeDt. 
Unu was tbo completion of telegraphic communication between Shu Jos6 
and San Franeisco, and the other was the robbery of the County Treas- 
ury. "William Akoahead was then Treasurer, and he announced to the 
people that oi\ Sunday night, January G, he was called to tbe door, and 
that upon opening it ho was felled by a blow, and his pockets rifled of the 
key .of tbo safe; that two men then went into the office and carried off 
twelve thousand dollars of the County's money. Although Akenhead 
offered a reward of one thousand dollars, the robbers were never appre- 
hended, nor was ony clue obtained as to their whereabouts. This, together 
with the further fact that Akenhead himself left suddenly the next year, 
led some to believe that his story of the robbery partook something of 
the nature of a fablo. 

Prom 1B53 to 1601 tbe County had a steady course of prosperity. 
What was accomplished during that period will more fully appear in the 
special tojiics treated below. In 1801 occurred what is known aa the 
"Settlers' War." By the terms of the treaty of Quadaloupo Hidalgo, 
entered into hotwcan the United States and Mexico at the termination 
of the war, and which gave Ciilirornia to tbe United States, it was pro- 
vided that all grants of land made by the Spanish or Mexican govern- 
ment lo their subjects in this State should bo confirmed to the granteeg 
or their successors, by tbo United States, upon the proper showing. Soon 
after tbo treaty speculators began buying up these grants, the boundaries 
of many of which were not generally known outside of the speculators' 
ring. These purchasers commenced suita in ejectment against the settlers, 
many of whom had located upon trncla under the supposition that they 
were public lands. This litigation caused the settlers to form leagues 
throughout tbe State for mutual protection. In this County the pur- 
chasers of tlie Spanish title to the Chabolla Grant obtained judgment of 
ejetlmeni against the settlers thereon, many of whom hud occupied the 
land for (juito a lengthy period. This decree was rendered by Judge Mc- 
Kec, of the Third District Court for Santa Clara County, and writs of ex- 
ecution for possession wore placed in tho hands of the Sherifi" for service. 
Tho Sberifl', knowing that resistance would be made lo the writ, sum- 
moned a posse of .aix hundred men to aid him in its execution. The 
posse assembled at the court-house, hut refused to arm themselves. The 
Sheriff seeing that the sympathios of tbe people were with the setllera, 
dismissed his jiosso. In tho mean time tho settlers, having board of tho 
intention to eject tliem from their homes, assembled to the number of 
nearly ono thousand and paraded through tho streets of the city. They 
were all armed, — sonic were on horses, some on foot, some in wagons, — 
tho column being supported by ono small cannon. It is said that leagues 
from other counties had sent men and arms to the assistance of tbe set- 
tlers of Santa Clara County, and were prepared lo still further aid them 
if necessary. There waa no violence offered, and tho settlers returned lo 
their homes with no other demonstration except the announcement that 
they meant "buainoss." The matter was peaceably adjusted afterwards, 
but the demonstration had tho oft'oet of causing Judge McKeo to adjourn 
the May term of tbo District Court, on tho grounds that there was no 
profit in rcLidoring judgments that could not be executed. 

In 18G2 tbe smallpox visited San Joaw. Quite a number died from this 
loathsorao disease, but tho deaths were chiefly among those portions of 
the lowor classes whose habits of uncleanlincsa invited the attack. Dur- 
ing this year the Alameda Turnpike Company was organized. During 
the summer and fall thoy repaired and graded tbe Alameda Road, between 
San JosiJ nnd Santa Clara, at a cost of twenty-eight thousand six hundred 
and eigUly-flvo dollars. They placed a toll-gate near where tho fair 
grounds now are. This gate was removed and tho road made free in 
July, 18G8. 

It was in this year, also, that Jasper D. Gunn, City Marshal, absconded, 
having cmbcKKled two thousand seven hundred nnd sixty-throe dollars 
of the ciiy money. 



In 18^53 the County rented tho second story of the building at the south- 
east corner of Market and Santa Clara Streets, and used the samo for 
County officers until tbe now court-house was finished, in 1868. 

The first railroad train made its appearance in San Josl- on tho IClh 
day of January, l8Gi. TLis was on tbe Wan Franei=co and San Joio 
Railroad, and was an event which caused much rejoicing among tho 
people, whose host means of communication with Sun Francisco had been 
hy stage, or by way of Alviso, on the boy. It was an event of great im- 
portance to all dosses of the community. Santa Clara County hud con- 
tributed two hundred thousand dollars to aid in the construction of this 
road, issuing therofur her bonds at fifteen years, and hearing Interest at 
the rate of eight per cent, per annum. This rood extended southwardly 
through the County, and reached Gilroy in ISRH. In 1870 tho road was 
extended through to Salinas, in Monterey County, and n branch con- 
structed from Gilroy to Hollisler, in San Benito County. The Western 
Paciflc liailroad, or rather the branch niad, running from San Jose to 
Niics, and there connecting with the lino of the Western Paeiflc Railroad, 
was constructed in 1869, the first train reaching San Jos6 September C of 
that year. To aid in the construction of this rond, Santa Clara County 
purchased one hundred and fifty thousand dollars' worth of stock in the 
Western Pacific Railway Company, paying for tho same in bonds of the 
County, at twenty 3'ears, bearing interest at seven per cent, per annum. 

From 1869 no incident nf general imporlaneo has transpired, except 
such 08 are fully referred to under special heads below, to which we refer, 
as wo also do to the sUtbtical tables, for detailed information, 

CRIMES AND PUNISHMENTS. 

We have tho record of nineleoii executions of the death penalty since 
tho cstabliabmcnt of courts in this County, two of which were for the 
crime of grand larceny and tho others for murder. The first executions 
of which wo have any official notice occurred in 1819. In January of 
that year three Americans stopped Thomas Fallon when on his way to 
Santa CruK, and attempted to rob him. Although bo had on his person 
soma two thousand five hundred dollars, ho managed by strategy to 
eacapo with a loss of only six ounces. These same highwaymen, after 
leaving Fallon, encountered two Germans, murdered them, and robbed 
them of eight thousand dollars in gold-dust. This was in the latter part 
of December, 1818. The robbers were captured, tried by jury in tbo 
Alcalde's Cuurt in January, 1819, and were hung on the Plaza within 
tbreo days after. In tbo summer of the samo year Antonio Valencia was 
esecuted for the murder of a son of Edward Pylo. This murder was com- 
mitted in 1847, and the circumstances worobriefiy tbo=o: Valencia, young 
I'ylo, and aovcral native boys were playing on the rancbo of Anistasio 
Chahulla, and in the play Valencia injured the horse belonging lo Pylo. 
Valencia waa at this time about eighteen years old. After tho play young 
Pylestarted for home, and the other hoys began to plaguo Valencia, saying 
that his mother would have to pay for tho horao he had injured. Being 
goaded by tbe taunts of his companions, Valencia jumped on a horse 
and rode off, from which time nothing was seen of young Pylo until his 
remains wore found in 18*9. In that year a brother of young Pyle re- 
ceived a hint of what had become of tbo missing boy, nnd caused the 
arrest of Valencia. Tho prisoner, on being arraigned before R.H. Dim- 
ick, Judge of the Court of First Instance, made the following confes- 
sion: "I killed a stranger on tho ranche of Chabolla Chabolla 

first told mo to go and kill tho stranger, I started right off, and lassoed 
him first, and dragged him a littlo ways, and thon cut his throat." Tho 
remains wore found buried among some stones nnd rubbish. Valencia 
was hung on tho Plaza, in the presence of the Alcalde and spectators. 

On tho SOih of January, 1852, Theodore Basquez was executed for steal- 
ing a horse, the law at that time providing for the punishment of grand 
larceny by imprisonment or death, in the discretion of the jury. Under 
tho provisions of this law, Ramon Rom6ro was executed Sovomber 26, 
1852. The law was repealed April 19, 1838. 

December 17 of tbo samo year, Guadalupe, an Indian, was executed for 
murder. For some lime previous to this, lawlessness and crime abounded 
in this vicinity. But the organization of Vigilance Committees in tbo 
early fall of tliia year either weeded out the criminals or intimidated 
them to such a degree that they measurably susponded operations. 

On tho 22d of July, 1854, tho Vigilance Committee hung Domasio Ber- 
rj'csEa to a tree, in tho southeast part of the town, Ho was supposed to 
hflva murdered Alexander McOlure about a month previous. 

On December 7, 1855, POdro, an Indian, was OKecutcd for murder, nnd 
on the 14th of the same month Qregorio Soborana was executed. 
September 12, 185G, Bias Anjelino was oxccutod for murder. 
May 8, 1857, Franeisco, an Indian, was executed for murder. 
July 11, 1857, Ricardo Lopez was executed for murder. 
July 18, Francisco Guileroz sutlered tbo samo penalty, 
November 2, 18G0, Salvador Garcia was eiecutcd for murder. 
July 10, 1803, Abner Smith was executed for the murder of Van Clean, 
of Eanla Clara. 
October 80, 1863, Ah Pah was executed for murder. 
March 10, 1875, Tiburcia VasqucK was executed for murder. Vasquez 
was a noted outlaw, famous for his robberies and murders throughout the 
State. In tbo month of August, 18G8, he, with a band of four men, made 
a descent on tho village of Trts Finon, in San Benito County, robbed 
tho store, murdered three men, and got off with bis booty. He was pur- 
sued hy tho officers for some four hundred miles, but succeeded in eluding 
them. He was finally captured near Los Angeles, through the treachery 
of one of bis friends. He was tried in this County at the January term, 
1875, of tho District Court, was convicted chiefly on tho testimony of ono 
of his accomplices, and exccutod in tho jail-yard by Sheriff Adams. 

CLIMATE AND SOIL OF SANTA CLARA COUNTY, 

It would bo impossible to give in words all tho characteriBtica that go 
lo make up tbe peculiar climate of Santa Clara County. The winters 
are not cold, nor are the aummorfi hoi. During the wintor-tirao snow 
falls on the lops of mountaing, but rarely extends down into tbo valley; 
indeed, there are but threo instances within the last hundred years when 
this baa occurred, and even then it disappeared almost as rapidly as it 



11 

fell. The winter months are called hy some the rainy season, but thif 
term would convoy lo the stranger a wrong impression ; our winters, in 
reality, corresponding lo Iho spring in other States. It is during this 
season that we receive all the rain that wo gel during the entire year, 
but the intervals between the showers are usually of n longer duration 
than tbo showers themselves. It is during those intervals that farmorri 
sow theirgrain, Tho average rainfall per annum is about fourteen inches. 
It is a usual Ihing to expect a alight abower during tho month of May, 
but the regular raina ceaso iit about the samo lime that States in tho East 
receive their last full of snow. From this time on, with tho exception 
of a slight shower in November, no rain falls until about the middlo of 
December. 

Tho long dry season from April to November is especially favorable 
to tho maturing of crops of all kinds. It causes tho death of all insects 
and vermin, so dostruetivo to fruit and grain in countries where tho sum- 
mer months are interspersed with frequent showers. It iiffurds the fiirinur 
ample time lo harvest his crops without fear of injury from rain. It is 
this peculiarity also which, by thoroughly ripening the grain, gives to 
California wheat its world-wide reputation for excollenee, and which 
causes that perfection in California fruit which has excited the admira- 
tion of people in less favored Slates. 

We give the following tbormometrical obscrvaliona of mean tempera- 
turo of the coldest and of the warmest months of an average year: 

A.M. 12JP.M. I'.M. 

August 63.10 83,74 tl4,87 

December 30.01 53.08 45,20 

Light frosts visit tho valley during tho winter-lime, but they are mil 
usually of sufficient severity to injure Ihe tendercst plants. On each side 
of tha valley and just al tho first bench of the Foothills there is n strip 
of country about three-quarters of a mile in width, running tho whole 
length of the Count}', nnd which is termed tho Warm Bolt. Within 
thcso limits frost is unknown, and semi-tropical frnils have been success- 
fully cultivated. The climate of Santa Clara County is no less favorable 
to animal than lo vegetable life. Shut off as it is from the ocean by a 
high range of mounlains, it is effectually protected from the harsh sea- 
winds and disagrecablo fogs so fatal to persons of delicate constitution. 
Tho prevailing winds are from Iho south during tho winter months, and 
from the north during tho summer. The nights during the summer-time 
arc cool, and conducive to healthful sleep. The valley has never known 
a sultry day nor an oppressive night. Climatic discnaes are unknown in 
Bnnta Clara Counlv, and opidemica are so rare that only two have been 
experienced within the memory of man, and those were disastrous only 
to those whose habits invited disoa-io. Bayard Taylor, who has expe- 
rienced all tho climates in the world, aays of the Santa Clara Valley, that 
" there is no place within tho jurisdiction of Ihe United States, scarcely 
any in tho world, whore men can, so many dayii as bore, in tho threo 
hundred and sixty-five of tho revolving year, exclaim, in truth, with tho 

poet, — 

" ' Sifoat doy, Bo pure, ao calm, su bright, 
Tho bridal of tho earth and sky.' " 

The soil of this County is varied, but in all of its variations it loses none 
of its excellence. It is generally a loam made up of alluvial deposits, 
and ranges in depth from four feet to an indefinite distance. In some 
portiona of tho valley it has been penetrated to a depth of over a hundred 
feet, and tho bottom was not found. Its adaptability U> different products 
depends principally upon its proximity to water-courses. Most of it is 
easily worked, and, if ordinary care is used in its cultivation, yields 
bountiful harvests to the husbandman. Tho capabilities of the soil will 
bo more definitely ascertained by a reference to the table of productions 
published elsewhere in this work. 

AGRICULTURE, HORTICULTURE, ETC. 

A detailed sketch of tho progress of agriculture in Santa Clara County 
would occupy more room than we can devole in tbe limits ofa work like 
this. Tho agricultural possibilitiea of tho County wore what attracted 
thofirst settlers, both at tho mission and at the Pueblo. Tho Spanish gov- 
ernment wanted horses and provisions for its army, and it was this that 
induced the order directing tbo aettlement by Lieutenant Moraga. 

We have given heretofore tbo amount and character of tho products of 
one of the earliest years in the history of tho County, and we give below 
a statement of the producU for tho year 1874 ; tho comparison of tbo 
two will afford an excellent idea of tbe progress that has been mado 
within that time, 

PRODUCTIONS. 

There is scarcely anything that soil will produce that cannot be grown \ 
with more or less profit in this valley. Wheat will yield from thirty lo \ 
eighty bushels per acre, and barley and other cereals in like proportion. . 
Wheat was one of the first cereals raised in this valley, and thero is land J 
in this County that has been sown to this crop nearly every year since, - 
and still produces a good yield. 

Certain portions of tbe County are well adapted to the growth of hops, 
which are pronounced by European dealers to bo the best in the world. 
All kinds of vegetabloa yield largely. Tobacco, both Havana and Florida, 
is grown with great success, particularly in Ihe southern portion of tho 
County. 

Of hito years considerable attention has been given to the breeding of 
fine cattle, and the herds of Santa Clara Counly now carry oil" many of 
the best prizes at the State and other fairs. Tho Angora or Cashmere 
goat thrives well bore, and many pounds of this valuable fleece are yearly 
shipped to the Eastern market. 

Fruit culture waa one of tho earliest industries engaged in in this . 
County. Tho Fathers at the mission planted the grapovino as ono of 
their first agricultural efforts. Orchards of pencil- trees followed, and other 
fruit in succession. 

The quality of tho fruit, however, was very inferior; and although ', 
largo quantities were grown, it was comparatively worlhless. But within 
tho last fifteen or twenty years this has been changed. The old and 
worthless trees havo either been cut down or rooted up, and nowor 



/orchnras of superior quolilyljave taken their place, uiilil now [his interest 
/ is one of the most vnluobio in the County, yielding nn imnienae revenue. 
I Every Tariety of fruit known to the temperate lonc reaches the grcntisl 
Vperfcction in tbia valley, while many 9emi-tro|.ic8l fruits ore cultivatotl 
Vith profit. 

Santa Olara County supplies the State with Gtrawberries, being the only 
County where Ihia fruit is successfully grown in sufficient ouanlitles to bo 
(lignifled by the name of a crop. Here there lire many Irncta, ranging 
from ten to eighty acres, devoted exclusively to this fruit,— the j-ield of 
which, during tho height of the season, is about three hundred pounds 
per day per acre. The average price during the whole season is ahout 
seven and one-butf cents per pound. In 18T1, tho numhur of atrawburry 
plant* returned by tho assessor wna twelve milHonfi. Since that time this 
number must have been at least doubled. 
' The growing "f plums and prnnoa has, of lata years, assumed great 
importance. The value of theao fruila when dried, and tho safety with 
which they con be shipped whan green, has given a great impetus to this 
industry. 

Viniculture is an important pursuit in this valley. Tho largest vine- 
yard in area is that D- M. Harwood, in Union District, and contains one 
hundred and forty iicros; but the Almaden Vineyard, of one hundred 
and twenty-eight acres, owned by Mr. Lo Franc, contains more vines. 
Thcro are many other vineyards ranging from seventy-five acres down. 
The old Mission grape has given place to tho host foreign varieties, which 
in this County arc said to thrive better than in their native soil. 

Scvornl experiments are being made in tho culture of ahnonda ; Ihero 
being eovornl orchards lately planted of from fifty to one hundred and 
forty acres ; and there is every indication that the experiment will prove 
pecuniarily successful. 

Great as is the amount of fruit of various kinds now raised in this 
County, it sooma that this industry ia only in its infaney. There are 
thousands of acres of unoccupied land in the foothills and mounlnios 
specially adapted for this purpose, and tho value of which for fruit grow- 
ing has just begun lo bo realized. 

AGRICULTURAL PRODUCTS. 

Land inclosed in 1874 — acres, 614,174; land cultivated in 1B74— acres, 
208,967; wheal^acres, 174.83C; wheat— bushels, 1,701,132; barley- 
acres, 12,903 ; barley— bushels, 123,197 ; oats— acrea, B52 ; oats— bushels, 
12,946; ryo— acres, 187; rye— bushols, 209G; corn— acres, 113; corn- 
bushels, 6263; peas- acres, 7; peas— bushels, 103; potatoes— acres, 187; 
potatoes, tons, 8498 ; sweet potatoes — acres, 7 ; swoot potatoes — Ions, 100 | 
onions -acres, 42; onions— bushels, 6576; hay— acres, 29,209; hay- 
tons, 57,921 ; hops- acres, 812; hops— pounds, 431,277; to bacoo— acres, 
628; lobaeco- pounds, 802,793; butter— pounds, 83,769; cheese— pounds, 
014,007; wool— pounds, 112,027; honoy— pounds, 1502, 

FRUIT-TREES AND VINES. 

Apple-trees, 111,127; peach-trees, 47,082; pear-trees, 85,095; plum- 
trees, 80,912; cherry-trees, 17,982; nectarme-lrees, 1541 ; quincc-lrees, 
2209; apricot- trees, 3764; llg-trees, 1417; lemon-trees, 1041; orange- 
trees, 8047; olive-trees, 10B9 ; prune-trees, 0493; mulberry-trees, 1498; 
almond-trees, 2909; walnut-trees, 2703; grapevines, 1,237,879. 

Wine— gallons, 137,847. 

Brandy- gallons, 73,537. 

Distilleries, 6; gallons, 17,948. 

Breweries, 2; gallons, 2,600,000. 

LIVE-STOCK. 

Horses, 11,218; mules, 483; asses, 24; eolts, 2768; cowfl—2 years old 
and over, 12,687 ; calves — under 2 years old, 5312 ; beef cattle — steers, 
2 years and over, 14,398; oxen, 49; totol number of cattle, 46,819; sheep, 
51,644; Cashmere and Angora goats, 1QS4; hogs — 1 year old and over, 
7782; hives of bees, 139. 

IMPROVEMENTS. 

Orist-mills, 9 ; alenm-power, 7 ; run of stone, 22 ; water-power, 2 ; run 
of atone, 7; barrels of flour made, 64,876 ; bushels of corn ground, 3096 ; 
bushels of barley ground, 24,385. 

Saw-mills, 6; steam-power, 3 ; water-power, 2; lumber sawed— foot, 
20,015,190. 

Woolen-mills, 2; pounds of wool used, 103,995. 

Bailroads, 4 ; miles in length, 72}^. 

Acres of wheat sown in 1875, 178,855. 

Acres of barley sown in 1876, 14,674, 

Acres of potatoes planted in 1875, 209. 

Acres of oats sown in 1875, 358. 

Assessed value of real estate in 1876, $10,332,038. 

AsEc^ed value of improvements on real estate, $4,809,344. 

Assessed value of personal property in 1875, $7,778,790. 

Estimated population in 1875, 81,000. 

Registered voters in 1875, 8997. 

Poll tax collected in 1874, $18,107. 

ARTESIAN WELLS. 

One of the greatest blessings that Sanla Cliira enjoys is its abundant 
supply ofwholesome water, drawn from the subterranean streams by means 
of tho artesian wells. This supply is inoxhoustiblo, and would, with tho 
inauguration of the proper system, bo sufDciont to irrigate tho entire 
valley. The first artesian well in the County was bored by tho Merritt 
Krothers in 1854, on Fifth Street, near St. John Street. In the same 
year J. L. Shepherd bored a well about three miles cast of San Jose. This 
well was eighty feet deep, and tho water was forced into tho pipe sixteen 
feet above the surface of the ground. But Iho most astonishing well that 
has over been conatructod in tbia valley was bored by G. A. Dabncy, in 
August, 1874, near San Fernando Street. It was sunk to a depth of si-vty 
feet, when tho water rushed up with a. force that defied all olTorts lo con- 
fine it. It flooded all the surrounding lands, and the City Council de- 



clared it a nuisance, and ordered that Dabney should pay a fine of fifty 
dollars for every day that bo allowed tho wal«r lo run. Bui this had no 
effect on the well, which for six weeks produced a stream four feet wide 
and six inches deep. At tho end of this lime the sinking of other wells 
in this neighborhood reduced tho fiow of water to fuch nn eilenl that 
this stream was got under control. Slnny of these wells furnish a suffi- 
cient bead of water to reach and supply the second story of houses. Wo 
give the following list of some of Ihe deepest wolla in tho County : at tho 
old hospital grounds, 355 feel ; Mrs. Hensloy's, 802 feet ; Slnuntain View, 
460 feet ; China Smith, 307 foot ; Jamea Murphy's, 487 feet ; St, James's 
Square, 316 feet. 

PUBLIC BUILDINGS. 

Thopublic buildings of Sonla Clara County are probably the linestin tho 
State. ThocoHrt-hou5owa3eommoneedinl8GO,andcompletedinl868,at a 
cost of one hundred and sovonty-threo thousand seven hundred and thirty- 
seven dollars and ninety-six cents. It is of the Roman-Corinthian order 
of architectuvo, and is situated on the west side of First Street, opposite 
St, James's Square, Tho superstructure is of solid brick masonry, resting 
on a foundation of concrete sis feet deep. The building is two stories in 
height, one hundred feet front, ono hundred and forty feet in depth, in- 
cluding portico. Its height to the cornice is sixty feet, lo tho lop of the 
dome one hundred and fifteen feet, to the lop of tho Dagstafl-ono hundred 
and eighty-five feet. The diameter of the dome at the base is fifty feet ; 
at the topsovenlcen feet. The front is broken into a portico sevonty-siic 
feet long, fifteen feet deep, supported by n Corinthian colonnade, and 
flanked hy fluted pilasters, which support the onlablaturo. The building 
has twenty-one rooms, two of which are used for court-rooms, tho others 
being used for offices, all of which are finely finished and furnished. Tho 
principal court-room is sixty-five feel long, forly-otght feet wide, and 
ihirty-oigbt feet high, and ia lighted from the ceiling by means of panels 
set with ground glass. It was built under the supervision of tho archi- 
tect, Lovi Goodrich. 

The County Jail, which is located immediately at tlio rear of tho court- 
liouso, was also built under tho supervision of its architect, Mr. Goodrich, 
Its conslruclion was commenced in tho spring of 1870, and was finished 
in I87I, at a cost of eighty thousand dollars. II is surrounded by a high 
brick wall, and for health, conveniences, and security is considered one of 
. tho first prisons iu the Slate. 

The County Infirmary is located on the County Farm, about three 
miles southwest of San Jusfi. This building was built in 1875, nt a cost 
of about twenty thousand dollars, its architects being Messrs, Lenzen & 
Lash, who also superintended its construction. It is three stories in 
height, porfeclly lighted and ventilated, and arranged with all the con- 
veniences experience could suggest. 

EDUCATIONAL. 

In addition to its excellent system of common schools, Santa Clara 
County is tho location of various institutions of learning. 

SANTA OLARA COLLEGE 
is situated at Snnta Clara, on tho site of the ancient mission. It is under 
the supervision of the Fathers of the Society of Jesus. Tho old Mission 
Church still stands there, but with a new roof and a modern front. It 
was founded in 1851, by Hev. John Kobili, but was not incorporated and 
empowered to confer degrees until April, 1835. No care nor expense has 
been spared to make this institution deserve tho enviable reputation which 
it has achieved. From timo to time new buildings have been added, 
until now ita accommodations nro of a very superior order. Its Faculty, 
presided over by Father Varsi, arc men each one of whom is eminent in 
his special department. Tho average attendance of students is about two 
hundred. Tho philosophical apparatus, the chemical laboratory, Ihcmu- 
seuni of natural history, the library, containing moro than ten thousand 
volumes, together with Iho infirmary and the gymnasium, are all models 
in thoir way. The Faculty consists of thirty special instructors, exclusive 
of Ihe President. There are two distinct courses of study, the classical 
and the scientific. There is but ana term in the school year, which com- 
mences in August and ends in June. 

UNIVERSITY OF THE PACIFIC, 
under tho auspices of tho Methodist Episcopal Church, is located on what 
is known as the " University Tract," about midwaj' between San Jo5i5 
and Santa Clara, This institution was incorporated in 1851, tho first 
graduating chirfs being composed of Thomas H. Laino and John W. 
Owen, who wcro the first class graduated in a classical course in Califor- 
nia. In 1870 the corner-stone of the present building was laid, tho Uni- 
versity having previously occupied somewhat cramped quarters in tho 
town of Santa Clara, For several years a medical department was con- 
noclod with tho University, hut this connc(!(ion was dissolved in 1872, 
In I8G9 ihn College and Female Institute were consolidated, ladies being 
admitted to Iho University classes on an equal footing with gentlemen, 
and allowed to competo for tho same degrees. A large and elegant 
building has rceontlybeen erected for the accommodation of the lady 
sludenU, and a similar ono is projected for the use of tho gentlemen. Tho 
College campus contains sixteen acres, iruprovod with walks and drives, 
and abounding with shrubbery. Thus far thirty A.B., sixty-four B.S,, 
and Ihirly-four M,D. degrees have bcon conferred. Rev. A, S. Gibbons, 
D.D., is President of tho institution, and is assisted by a full and compe- 
tent Faculty. 

THE COLLEGE OF NOTRE DAMK 
was established in 1851, and the Qrst structure was a wooden building, 
located UN tho present grounds on Santa Ohira Street, between San Pedro 
and Santa Teresa Streets, Hut in 1863 the inslilutlon had grown so in 
popularity tlinl tho increased number of pupils forced Ihoni to enlarge 
thoir promises, and Ihoy have now jirobably the finest college for young 
ladies in the State. Tho buildings, a sketch of which appears elsewhere, 
arc numerous and substantial, and meet every want incident to an insti- 
tution of this character. The grounds contain roiirloon acres, surrounded 
by a brick wall eight feet high, and are beautllHilly adorned with lawns, 



flower-beds, orchards, and vinoyarda. Tho institution is pre*ided orcrby 
tbo Sisters of Notre Dame, a sistorhood which devotes all its energia 
and resources to tho educolioii of iheir aei. The course of study in com- 
pleto and thorough, comprehending every item necessary lo a finished 
edueation, both intollectually and morally. 

SAN JOSfi INSTITUTE AND BUSINESS COLLEGE. 

This institution was established by Freeman Gates in 18G1, aad is lii. 
iiated on First Street, between St. James and Julian Streets. It was pre- 
sided over by Mr. Gules up to tho timo of his decease in 1872, with the 
exception of a short interval, when it was under the management of Mr. 
George E. Houghton. After SLr. Gates's death, tho institution was con- 
ducted by Mr. James Vinsonhalcr, in conjunction with Mrs. A. M. 
Gates, Professor Vinsonhalcr taking charge of tho commercial depart- 
ment, and bringing it up to a stalo of perfection seldom witncssea in 
.■■chools of this character. ProfcMor Vinsonhaler died in May, 187(1 Mr. 
Louis Ehormayer was appointed to lake charge of the commercial de- 
partment. It bos been a valuable help to the educational inlercsu of 
Sanla Clara County, and has done much good work in the cause of prue- 
tical education. It is now in charge of Mr. Isaac Kinley as Superln- 
t«ndent, 

THE STATE NORMAL SCHOOL, 

This institution, standing as it docs at tbo head of tbo common school 
system of the Slato, is looked upon with interest and pride by all ciiizen* 
of the Pacitlc coast. It is located in the city of San Jose, on Waihing- 
ton Square, a tract bounded by San Fernando, Seventh, San Carlos, and 
Fourth Streets, and is ono thousand one hundred and sixty feet in length 
by one thousand and five feet in width. It was donated to the Slate by the 
city in consideration of the making San Jos£ the location of the school. 
Tho present building was commenced in 1870, Theodore Lon^ca being tho 
architect, and was not fully completed until 1876, owing lo tho inadequacy 
of legislative appropriations, but it has been occupied for several year?. 
The building is three hundred and fourteen feet long and two hundred 
and twenty-nine feet deep; in height it is seventy feet to Ihc lop nf tho 
cornice, and one hundred and fifty-two feet lo tho top nf the lower, with 
a basement ten feet high in the clear. It is of the Corinthian order of 
architecture, and prescntd a magnificent appearance. Its total cost bns 
never yet been definitely announced, but it will approximate two hun- 
dred and lievcnty-livo thousand dollars. In addition to numerous com- 
modious recitation -rooms, it contains a chemical laboratory, rooms 
and apparatus for philosophical apparatus and oiperiments, manikin.' 
and models for the study of anatomy, libraries, museum of natural 
history, etc. It has connected with it a training achoo! in which stu- 
dents obtain a practical experience in teaching and dealing with chil- 
dren. During tho year 1870-6, tho number of students was five hun- 
dred and ono. Tho inatitulion is under charge of a Board of Trustees, 
of which tbo Governor of the Slate is Chairman. Tho Principal of llio 
school is Mr. Charles H. Allen, who is assisted by a Board of Instruc- 
tion composed of eleven experienced instructors. 

COMMON SCHOOLS. 

The common school system of California ia carried out lo iU full per- 
fection in Sanla Clara County. The rigid examination lo which Iho 
teachers are subjected insures the employment of none but the best mate- 
rial,— generally, only about twenty per eent. of those applying receive 
tho required certificate. 

The first common schools of the County were organized in 1853. There 
were two schools established, both located in San Jose. At that time the 
County did not own a school-houao, nor did it possess a school lot. At 
present there are in Santa Clara County 53 school districts, with 83 school 
buildings; 105 teachers nro employed, and there is an average attendaaco 
of 4892 pupils. The sum of $90,072.99 is received from all sources as 
school money. The school-houses are built on the modern plan, with 
plenty of light, good ventilation, comfortable seats, and with a due re- 
gard to a;?thelic5. The average annual cost to the County of each pupil 
is about §18.50. The number of children in tho County of school ago is 

8410. 

SCHOOL CENSUS REPORT, 1875. 





WaiTB. 


NcaHQ. 


ISBIIK. 


KunitKrrofcliIlilninlHitncDUllifnGoacriinnillT 


i 

tJTfl 


3 

1172 




1 
IB 


5 

3f 


21 i .- 


5 

5 


3 
10 


DetRccD 5 and ll.dltcnillng publto ecbi»1 

Balweim B nnd 17, allunJlDB [irivniB ncliool — 






l.| 


i_ 


___ 



138 



Mongolian children under 17 years of age......; — ■-■ '3? 

Mongolian children between 5 and 17, attending school ca 

Deaf and dumh, between 5 and 21 years of age ^ 

Blind, between 5 and 21 years of age 

Children, native horn, nuiivo parents ??i" 

Children, native born, one parent forei^'n j"" 

Children, native born, both parenU foreign *''^^ 

Children, foreign born - " 

Number of school districts 

Number of school buildings 

Number of teachers employed,-.-.. ..—■ ei^'iotrfi,! 

Amount of school money derived from Slate 'Si'V^-SV 

I, It li " " County. 2C,12u.,;i 

'■ other sources 10,22418 

Total amount $90,072.99 

MANUFACTORIES. 

The high prices for labor which have ruled in California hnvchilhcrlo 
had a depressing efleot ou manufacluring enterprises in Sanla Clani 
County, but she is last reeovoring from this incubus. The adnplabiliiy 
of this County to manufacturing piirposi-s bt'comes luanifesl when her 
great capacity for producing raw material ts considered. Already several 
manufacluringentorpriscsaresueccsarully in operation. Principal tuiions 
those arc — 

Tbo San Jos6 Woolon-Mills, (atablisLed in 1870. Its capncily per an- 



num la 144,000 yards of coufmcre, 64,000 yardt of flunofl, and .5000 pain 
i.f blankeU, nnd cmploji 43 hands. Ttio Sanla Clara Valley Mill and 
Lumber Company, the Sun Jot/' Mil! and Lumbfr Company, Ihe Bear 
Cri'ek Lumbfir Company, nil of Sbii Jobi', and the Enleriiri'e Mill and 
Lumber Company of Sanlu Clara, represent the iiijinufacluro of lumber 
in this Cijunly. The gaw-millH of liicio comi.anie- aro loculed in the 
PlPiI Woods, jiift ovor the inmmit <•{ the Kantn Cru!; M'lunluitif, while 
tli':ir pInrilng-milU for the maniifucture uf mill-work are located in San 
Jdh' and in Hanln Chira. During the lumber iciuon of 1875 these milU 
III 11(111 fat'tti red and sold in Sanla Claru County about seventeen million 
f'.'ul of lumber. 

The iiianuracluro of machinery and foundry work is uirried on quite 
ext'idhively, llic principal ilio[iii being those of Joseph Enright, Oonuld 
MeKenEie, and 'VVatkini' & Scott. The^e ebopi manufacture all kinds of 
cnginuh, agr!i;ultural implumenta, and caat-iron work used in business 
blocks. 

Tlin Angora liobc and Gliivo Company was organised, in 1875, for (he 
purpoio of dyeing, tanning, and manufacturing the skin and fleece of the 
Angora or Canhmcra guat into robes, ruga, glovoH, etc. 

The lannfng cstabliehment of Mr. Jacob Gborhardt, in Banta Clara, ii 
oiLU of ilie most osteniivo institutions of the kind on this coast, being 
t-aimblo of turning out all classes of work, from the most delicate glove 
kid to tlio conrscDl solo leather. 

The Saratoga and Lick's Paper Mills, one set of which is located ut 
Sarnt'igd, and the other on the Gundiilupo Uiver, between Santa Clarn and 
Alviso, have been run up lo their full capacity over since they wore 
eelablishcd, and haTa proved tho c»torpri«o a success. The same may be 
said of the ^jummcrvll1c Fnslehuard Mill, which is also located at 
Sariitgga, 

li'luurlng-mills of very extensive character are located in vnrioUB por- 
lioiiB of the County, and aniiuiiUy shiji largo quantitieji of llour lo foreign 
|Mjrts. The moat important of these are the mills of Moody & Bros., and 
(Jriingo Mills, in San Jose; tha Santa Clara Valley Mills at Gilroy, and 
Hogers't MilU at Los Galos, the hitter hehig run by water-power. 

Thu inanufacluro of kid gloveN has iiliiO grown into quite an industry, 
niid jiruparations are being made for raising, tanning, and dyeing tho 
.-.kins used in thid business. 

Tlie manufacture of fruit-boies is an industry of great importance to 
lliu County. The principal factories are the Santa Clara Valley Fruit- 
Packago Manufactory and the San Joa6 Boi Factory. 

Tho manufaeturc of tobacco and cigars is eitensivoly carried on at 
Oilroy by the Consolidated Tobacco Company of California. 

Tho manufacture of raisins, prunes, and other dried fruits is niten- 
aivcly carried on by the Alden Fruit-Drying Company, while the San 
Jos6 Frnit-Pauking Company annually put up about five hundred thou- 
sand cans of fruit for shipment. Wine and brandy ara extensively man- 
ufiiflured, tho princlpi\ wino-makoi' being Charles Lo Franc, of the 
Aliiiadcn Vineyard, aiid the principal manufaclurera of brandy being 
Uuueral Nuglec, Mr. Stockton, and Mr. Laiiisurain. 

Then) are nuinerous shops for tho manufacture of wagons, carriages, 
furnituro, agricultural implements, eto,, which are rapidly growing into 
laigo manufacturing establishments. 

Thu amount of capital invested in manufacturing enterprises in Santa 
Clara County will bo seon by reforoncu to the islatistical tables. 

BUILDING STONE. 

One of tho most important products of Santa Clara County is tho build- 
ine stone found in tho quarry of Levi Goodrich, located about eight 
miles south of San Jos6, and a little south of tho Alinaden Ituad. This 
stonu is probably the most perfect in tho world for building purposes. It 
resembles somewhat in appearance Cuen stone, uf which the city of Paris 
h built, but is of a much higher quality. It has a beautiful cream color, 
unchangoablo by time or eiposuro to the weather. By n careful analysis 
made at Santa Clara Collego it is found to consist of grains of silica, 
bound by a siliceous cement, and is pronounced to be tho purest sand>tonc. 
It is perfectly flro-proof, tests having been made by lienting it to red 
heat in a furnAco, and then phmging it in a bath of cold water. This 
tost produced not tho slightest etlcct either on its texture or color. Tho 
supply is inexhaustible, and it is easily quarried of any size or shape. As 
yet these quarries have not been estensivcly worked, but as the quality 
of the stone becomes known the demand is becoming greater. 

MINES AND MINING INTERESTS. 

The now Almaden Quicksilver Mines, named from the mines of Alroa- 
den on the frontier of Estromadura, in old Spain, are situated llfteen 
miles south of San Jose, in the Santa Cruz Mountains, at un elevation of 
seventeen hundred feet above the sea. They were known to the Indians 
lit on early day, who resorted to them for tho purpose of obtaining tho 
red paint contained. in tho cinnabar, but who know nothing about quick- 
silver. They used the paint to adorn their persons, and although they 
wero severely salivated with every application, they, like the fashionable 
women of the period, were willing to saerilice physical comfort to per- 
sonal appearance. A Spanish ofiicer named Cnstillero, seeing Indians 
thus painted, mado inquiry of Ihom, discovered the location of the mino, 
and lllod a claim to it. But not complying with the conditions prescribed 
in such cases, ho lost control of it, and, after much litigation, it passed 
into the hands of tbc Quicksilver Mining Company, by whom it is now 
held and worked. 

These mines were first worked for quicksilver in 1845, but the opera- 
tion's were on a small scale, and no record exists earlier than 1850. They 
have been, and ure now, tho most productive quicksilver mines in the 
world, excepting only the mine of Almadcn in Spain. They arc de- 
veloped to a depth of thirteen hundred feet, and the workings extend 
horizontfllly, somewhat in the shape of tho letter Y. 

Between Ave and six hundred men find steady employment, the work 
being actively prosecuted throughout tho year. From tho 1st of Januory, 
1834, to the 3l9t of December, 1875, the number of feet of drifting ond 
sinking on the mines of tho Company, as shown by the records, amounted 
lo 1^9,724 feel, or 20.24 miles, at o coal of $1,000,000. This does not in- 



clude the excavations made in extracting ore during the period named. 
nor any expenses for the same. 

In 1875 there were used in the mines 2861 ki^ of black powder (26 
pounds each) and 0360 jiounds of Giant and Hercules |iowder,— the rock 
in most cases requiring to be drilled and blasted. At the clo.^e of the 
same year about five mile? of railroad, underground, were in operation, 
and over 2000 drill- were in active use. 

The reduction works consi^'t of nine furnaces, and include the moat im- 
provi'd methods for working quicksilver ores. When the present Improve- 
ments are finished, ihey may he considered us most complete and perfect 
in every respect. 

The following table shows the production of quicksilver at Now Alma- 
den for twenly-lhrco years and three months, ending December, 1876: 



n 

= 3. 






tn c- 14 u 1. 1- t- 1- 1- ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ -^ -il -i; a; u t, L, t, t,^ u t. ^ 
° = ? = = ??? r ? r? :<^?^F^^ ^crx"'7'< M-7^^ 

l^illiiiiiiiliiiiii^iiHlii 
iii?Jiii-^iiiiiiiliiiiiipipP 















_tD j3 com oa to a jiOw jj u 



sgssssss 



8i B^SS 



S'S 



11 



Total 
fouaill, 



as 3= 



JO-JO 



Fliuka from 
IVaiLdigi. 






F[iuki. 
ToUiI, 






jojijjjsiajl---- 






Avoiagp 

Amount iwr 

Month. 

Fliiski. 






InctUilingall. 






I Tnlo per ct 
araroni'M. 
I Tlor.tWngs. 



THE GUADA.LUPE QUICKSILVER MINES 

are located about four miles northwest of New Almadon. They wore 
first discovered in 1846, but soon wont into tho hands of a wealthy Enst- 
orn company, called tho " Sontn Clara Mining Association," of Balti- 
more. The mine contains many rich lodes, but at such a depth ua to 
render it necessary to employ extra machinery in order to keep out tho 
water. ■ 

" TiiK NoTiTii AniADEN' Mine" is situated about ton miles east of San 
Jos6, on what is known as Silver Creek. This mine has boon known for 
quite a number of years, but until lately has only been worked spasmod- 
ically and without capital or energy enough to develop its resources. 
During tho present year it went into tho hands of Captain J. H. Adams, 
an old and experienced miner, who has organized the North Alraaden 
Company, put up a furnace, and proposes to develop the mine to the full- 
est extent of its resources. At tho present time tho prospect is flattering 
for a large yield of quicksilver. 

There is a prevailing impression, based upon suportlcial prospect, that 
tho Santa CruB Eango contains large deposits of coal, while tho Coast 
Eann'o at various points contains good prospects for quicksilver, tin, cop- 
per, and other metals. But these are only the possibilities of the future. 

SANTA CLARA VALLEY AGRICULTURAL SOCI- 
ETY. 

This society was organized in 1853 by Louis Provost, Louis Pollier, J. 
B. Bonlomps, B. S. Pos, and E. "W. Case, under the name of the " Pio- 
neer Horticultural Society," and held monthly meetings at tho City Hall 
in San JosC, whoro the members compared products and held consulta- 
tions, In 18S1 an agricultural society was formed, and in 1857 the two 
societies svero consolidated, and tho present name adopted, liie first officers 
being Judge Daniels, President; Colman Younger and Joseph Aram, 
Vice-Presidents ; J. C. Cobb, Secretary j It. G. Moody, Treasurer ; L. A. 
Gould and L. Prevost, Directors. The first fair was held on the 18th and 
I9tb of December, 1857, and fairs wero held annually thereafter. In 
1850 tho society was regularly incorporated under an act of tho Legisla- 
ture. In 1859 tho present fair grounds, located on tho Alameda, were 
jiurchasod from General Nagleo for six thousand dollars. The purchase- 
money was raised by subscription, the County donating live hundred dol- 
lars. The tract contains seventy-sis acres, ond is now worth, including 
improvements, about one hundred thousand dollars. This society is 
probably in a better condition than any other similar organization on the 
coast. In oddition to the property owned by it, it has enough funds on 
hand to continue the improvement of the park and to aflbrd liberal pre- 
miums lo exhibitors. Tho fairs held by tho society are always numer- 
ously attended from abroad, and allord tho finest exhibition of stock, 
fruit, etc., in the State. The following is a list of Prcaidents and Secre- 
taries: 



13 

DaU. PratdenU. Sccntkriia. 

1859 Wm. Daniels... , C. B. Youngor. 

1800 '■ ■' " " 

1851 S. J. Hensley Wm. Daniels. 

18C2» Wm. Daniels 0. B. Younger. 

18G2t- .Gary Peebles - J. R. Lowe, Jr. 

1863 Jnm'cs F. Kennedy ■' •' 

1864.. " " " Givcne George. 

1865 W.C. Wilson ■' 

18G«..... " " " " 

18G7 " ■' '■ ■' 

18G8 " ■' Tyler Beach. 

1860 " " " '■ 

1870 " '■ '■ '■ 

1871 - " " " 

1872 " " Givcns Georgo. 

1873 ■' " D. J. Porter. 

1874 " " " 

1875 " " Givons George. 

187G ..........J. P, Sargent D. J. Porter. 

ROADS AND HIGHV/AYS. 

For many years after tho organization of tho County the public roiidn 
were in a miserable condition, but of hilo years they have rapidly im- 
proved, until they aro now inferior lo none In the Stale. It has cost u 
great dual of money to bring them to their present slate of perfection, 
and about ninety per cent, of the floating debt of tho County was incurred 
for this purpose. Road-building is constantly going on, and will proba- 
bly not be discontinued to any great extent until every point in the 
County is easily nccessthlo. 

NEWSPAPERS. 

The first newspaper published in Santa Clara County was tho Stale 
Journal, edited by James B. Dovoo. Its first issue was on tho lOth of 
December, 1850, and its last in 1861, shortly after tho adjournment of 
the Legislature. 

The San Jose Daily Atijus, published in tho interest of Fremont, was 
established January 4, 1851, but only lived through the Senatorial cam- 
paign. 

Tho San Jose Weekly Wiatlor was the first permanent newspaper pub- 
lished in Santa Clara County. It was commenced June 20, 18G1, by 
Emerson, Damon, and Jones. After the first six months Damon with- 
drew, and the publication was continued by Emerson, with A. Jones, Jr., 
as editor. It was Whig at firol, but in October it was changed to tho 
Doraocracy. Its name was changed in August, 1852, to the Simla Clom 
Register, J. C. Emerson and Givens George being the publishers, and F. 
B. Murdoch editor. 

P. B. Murdoch having obtained control of the Rcgisler, its name was 
changed in 1853 to the San Jose TeUji-aph, and lis publication was con- 
tinued until I8C0, when it went into tho hands of W- N. Slooum, and in 
1801 wa? merged into the San Jost Weekly Mcrcuiy. 

The Semi- Werkly Tnhiiiie was issued July 4, 1854, by Givens George. 
In 1856 it was published by George & Kendall. In 1850 these parlies 
sold out the paper to George O'Dougherty, who published it until 18G8, 
when it was purchased by F.'B. Murdoch, and became tho Patriot. The 
Tribune was suppressed for about eight months in 1802 and 18G8 by 
General Wright. Tt was then published by O'Dougherty. 

In January, 1860, W. F. Stewart began the publication of tho .San Jo»i 
Daily Reporter. It was changed to tho Weekly Iteporlcr in April of tho 
same year. It was discontinued after a few months' publication. 

Tho San Jose Weekly Mercui-y was started in 18G1 by J. J. Owen, ho 
having obtained control of the TeUjiraph. In June.of that year B. H. 
Cattle wont into the paper, which was then published by the firm of 
Owen & Cattle: On November 5, 1801, the Daily Mercury was started 
in connection with tho Weekly, but was disconllnued in February, 1802. 
In 1860 the firm consisted of Owen, Cattle & Conmy. lu August of that 
year tho publication of tho Dully Mercury was recommenced, but was 
again discontinued in 1870. In this year Cattle and Conmy retired, leav- 
ing Owen in solo charge of the paper. In 1872 Owen & Cattle purchased 
the Ouidt, and again commenced the publication of tho Daily Mercury in 
connection with the Weekly. In December, 1874, Catllo sold out his in- 
terest in both papers to J. J. Owen, who is now the publisher. 

Tho San Jose Weekly Patriot was started in 1803, by F. B. Murdoch. 
In 180G he commenced the publication of the Daily Pairint. Tho Weekly 
Patriot was discontinued in 1874. In 1875, the Daili/ Pati-iot passed into 
tho hand^ of S. J, Hinds and J. G. Murdoch, who are now tho publishers. 
Tho Daily anil Weekly O.urier was started by George 0. Tiftony in 1806, 
but only run a few months. Tho publication of the Santa Clara Argiii 
was commenced by William A, Januory, on the 0th of January, 1800. 
Ho ran a daily in connection with tho Weekly from August 10 to Novem- 
ber 7, 1808. The Week';/ is now published by Messrs. January, Kerns & 
Wore. 

The Saiiiiilay Advertiier began publication August 11, 1800, with C. L. 
Yates as proprietor. It was discontinued February 13, 1869. 

Moy 17, 1870, the DaUy Indcpeiuleat was started by a compony of 
printers. In December of that year it was purchased by Norman Porter, 
who in turn sohl out to tho Qiiiile in 1871. 

Tho DaUij Oaidc was started in February, 1871, by Stockton & Hans- 
brough. Hansbrough sold out his interest lo Stockton during the some 
year, who purchased the Inilependeitt of Porter, and merged the two 
papers under the name of the Guide. In January, 1872, Porter received 
the Guide from Stockton, and sold tho same to Owen & Cottle in March, 
who changed the name to the Daily Mercury. 

IheDaUy Press, by J. J. Conmy, was published for a few weeks during 
tho early portion of 1872. 

The Reporter was published by H. A. DoLacoy from April to August, 
1872. 

Tho California AgrieuUurist (monthly) was started by Brand & Hallo- 
way in May, 1871. S. H. Herring purchased Brand's interest during the 
same year, and in 1874 ho purchased Halloway'a intnrest, and has pub- 
lished the paper over since. 



r JoQQarjla Aprit. 



f Snm April. 



14 

The Daily Ereniny TrU'Unr was published during Ilie canipuign of 
1872, by Clovinger & Armstrong. 

During the locu! option campaign of 1874, tbc Daili/ TndepeniUnl Cnli- 
fr.minn wns published by Herring & Casey. 

The Daily OarJen City Tima was started in August, 1874, by & syndi- 
cnlc of printers nnd literary gcntlemiyi, hnt onlj- lived about iix wooks. 

The Daily and Wtihly Adtertlicr, by B. H. Oattk, commenced publi- 
cntion in May, 1875, nnd was diai;ontintied December 4, 1875. 

The Weekly Balanee-Sfieef, a commercin! pnpcr, was commenced Feb- 
ruary 12, 187(1. E. S. Foole, publisher and jiropriclnr. 

The California Journal of Bdtieaiion was commenced June 1, 1870, G. 
Huinill4)n, proprietor. 

The Leadrr and AdtioeaUlB pahlishei at Gilroy. J. C. Sr«rlin, pub- 
lisher end proprietor. 

The Sanln Clara Echo is published At Santft Clara. 0. W. "Upton pro- 
prietor, and W. 0. Wil.?on publisher. 

In 180.9-70 a paper called the Kn-lerprist was publislicd at iruyfield, by 
W. H. Olippurton. It was moved to Gilroy In 1871, and called the Oil- 
riry Telegram. It only lived until thn end of tliu campaign or the latter 
your. , 

The Temperance C/iampioii — Aleinndor "Miirgatton, proprietor — com- 
menced publication Juno 1, 1870. 

PLACES OP INTEREST. 

Mr. Jnmoi Lick, in his celebrated deed of gift, appropriated seven 
hundrei] thousand dollars for the construction iind mainlcnnncc of nn 
OBtronomicnl observatory on the Pacific const, and selected Mount Hnni- 
ilton, in Santa Clnra County, as the site therefor. One of his stipuliitiuns 
was that the tolcscopn to bo erected in the observatory iiiuiiild be liie must 
powerful in the world. The County is now building a flrHt-cliis,'! road to 
the summit of Iho mountain, which is about eighteen mile.i eaHt of San 
Joai. This roud is of a very easy grade, and winds roHnd the sides of 
the mountain, presenting to the traveler at each turn H new and iniigniil- 
cent landscape. From the summit thcro is an unbroken horii'.on, with 
the Pacific Ocean on the west and the great San Joaijuin plains on the 
east. "Work is to bo soon commenced on the oKiiervatory building, which 
will be completed as soon ns possible. The road is already a favorite re- 
sort for tourists, and will posfess superior attractions when iho work is 
nil Unishcd. 

The Paoifio CoKORESa SPBiTfQS ore located about nine miiea north- 
west of Santa Clara, and a mile from Saratoga, on a plateau in ihe hills. 
A hotel furnishes every nccommodiition to visitors. Stages rim regularly, 
and a telegraph lino connects the hotel with all jioinls in [ho State. The 
analysis of tho water ia, chloride of sodium, 119,1.59 ; sulphate of soda, 
12.140; carbonate of soda, 123.351 ; carbonate of iron, 14.030; carbonate 
of lime, 17.295; silica, alumina, with trace of magnesia, 40.882, 

Gilroy Hot Sfbinqs are located on the eastern slope of the Facheco 
Mountains, about fifteen miles east from Gilroy, and are about twelve 
hundred feet above the sea level. They are greatly resorted to by in- 
valids, who find relief by bathing in the waters, which have n teraperu- 
ture of about 110°, and are strongly impregnated with iron, magnesia, 
sulphur, alum, and arsenic, the iron predominating. The springs are 
easy of access by stuge from Gilroy. 

The City P.ikk is located in Penitoncia Caiion, about seven miles 
ooBt from San Josfi, on a portion of the Pueblo lands reserved by the city 
as a place of resort for her people. The approach is by the Santa Clara 
Avenue, a beautiful drive laid out and improved at the expense of the 
city. The Park contains about four hundred acres, and is traversed by a 
beautiful stream, — the Peniteneia,— and abounds with mineral springs, 
both warm and cold. A magnifleent hotel is to he erected on the grounds. 

There are numerous summer re-iorls scattered through the County, 
while nut a few of the merchant princes of San Francisco have built 
elegant mansions within its borders for summer occupation. 

FINANCIAL. CONDITION OF THE COUNTY. 

The total indebtedness of the County will be seen by a reference to the 
statistical tables. She has real estate and improvemonU, including school- 
houses, etc., amounting to about eight hundred thousand dollars. Her 
bonds bring a premium in the market, and her amount of taxnble prop- 
erty is BO large that the rate of Unntion is as low as any other County in 
the State. 

^i/-^'' ^ '"'"^3 bearing int. at Tpercent., redeemable 1885.. §160 OOO 00 
|-^;^-?-,, " !' „ " ■' 1876.. 90,000.00 

Funded debt, " 8 " " 1885.. iao|o00.00 

FLO A TING INDEBTEDNESB. 

OuUtanding warrants on road fund, bearing 7 per cent. int... §50 548.01 
" " inflrmnryfund, " " .. 19'!)74.']2 

" " current exp. fund, " ■' .. 'lC7.40 

Total of all indebtedness gj^G ceXli 

DESCRIPTIOH AND VALUB OK rnoPERTY OWNED IK THK COUNTY. 

Ccmrl-liouse and jail c„n- --„ „„ 

County infirmary farm (110 acres) '.."'SZZ 11 000 00 

" " improvements ' ao'oOo'.OO 

'^*''"' $350,000.00 

TABULAK STATEMKN-T OV THE TOTAIS OP THK ASSKSHHKNT ROtLB Or 
BANTA CLAR* COUNTY POR THE TEAR 1874-5. 

Number of acres assessed (..q (,j-q 

Value of real estate, other than eity'oV'town'loU^V.V.'.'.'.V.V.'siS.MO 744 00 
improvemcnU on the same i nmd.ici'nn 

;: ?"j'""i ^^- '»t3,.. :::::::;: IfililiZ 

^^ improvemenU on the same 12 822 4(i5.00 

" on real estate ossessed to other 

,, , „ . than owners 7G.07G 00 

Value of personal propertv 7 048 957 00 

Total value of all .'. ' ::::z::::::::z:. &!1%Z 

Total ta:. levied *." ."!!!.'!?.'! ?."'"'!!". I*^.!^!"^ "'.Hajilm" SS 



THE COURT OF SESSIONS AND BOARD OF 

SUPERVISORS IN SANTA CLARA COUNTY, 

FROM ITS ORGANIZATION, IN 18S0, UNTIL 

THE PRESENT TIME (1876). 

On the 1.5th day of Jlay, 1850, the County Court issued an order 
directing the Justices of the Peace to meet at the County seat on the 1st 
day of June, 1850, and elect two of their number to act as Associate 
Judges of the Court of Sessions. 

At that meeting Cnswell Davis and H. C. Smith wore chosen na Asso- 
ciate Justices, and Iho llrst Court of Sessions that bad control of the 
i County business wiu organized, as follows: J. W. Hedman, Presiding 
' Judge; Caswell Davis and H. C. Smith, Associate Jiislices. 
! July 5, 1851, John Gilroy appointed Assoeiftlo Justice vice. H. C. 
Smith, resigned. 

August 18, 1851, an entry appears naming Charles Clayton and Cas- 
well Davis us Associate Justice*, hut how Clayton's name cumcs in is not 
shown by the records. 

October 6, 1851. It. B. Itucknor and Marcus "WilHnms elected Asso- 
ciate Justices. 

December, 1851. CyrUB G. Sanders appointed Associate Justice viee 

B. B. Buckner, resigned. 

May 14, 1852. Poleg llush appointed As.-iociato Justice n'ct; Marcus 
■Williams, who was abient from tho County. 

Juno 4, 1852. An election for Supervisors wa.« ordered to bo held on 
the second Monday in Juno, 1852, in accordance with an act of the Legis- 
lature jiaased May 3, 1852. 

Tho following names comprised Ihe llrst Board i)f Supervisors for tho 
County, vi^.; Isaac N. Senior, Prenident; Fred. E. Whiting, Wm. B. 
Taylor, Jacob Orewell. 

As organised December 6, 1852: L. W. Bascom, Prcaidenl; Jno. B. 
Allen, A. M. Church, Levi Goodrich, and Joocph C. Boyd. 

September 7, 1853: George Peeic, President; Daniel Murpby, B. G. 
Moody, "\Vm. Daniels, W. Gallimore. 

In April, 1854, the County government again went into tho hands of 
lliu Court of Sessions, with R. B. Eucknor County Judge, Caswell Duvi.* 
and Thomus L. Vcrmucle A?3ocialo Justices. 

At the meeting held June, 1854, F. B. Murdoch served aa A.'sociute 
Justice vice Thomas L. Vermuele. July 20, Sanuiel Rutherford took 
the place of Murdoch as Associate JuaLico. August 7, 1853, Murdoch 
again appeitrs as As^-ociate Justice, 

October 1, 1854. R. B. Buckner County Judge, Caswell Davis and 

C, G. Thomas Associates. 

October 25, Marcus "Williams and J. P. Martin were Associates. 

By nc) of the Legislature, SInrch 10, 1855, a Board of Supervisors was 
re-established, and at an election held April 9, 1855, the following persons 
were elected : Samuel Henderson, Pvasitlcni ; Wm. R. Basaham. 

Daniel Murphy receives a majority of votes in District No. 3, hut his 
name does not appear in any uf the proceedings of the Board. 

November 5, 1856. Wm. H. IJasshum, Pi-caidc/U; Wm. R. Bane, 
Samuel Morrison. 

1856-7. Gary Peebles, President; China Smith, D. E. Douglass. 

1867-8. Joseph H. Kincaid, President; Samuel A. Ballard, Albert 
Worth en. 

1858-9. John M. Swinford, Pi-taldeni; Kli Jones, H. D. Coon. Isaoc 
Bninhani iil'lerwurds filled the place vocniod by Eli Jones. 

1859-00. H. D. Coon, Pnsideiil; H, J. Bradley, Isaac Bn.nham. 

18G0-1. H. J. Bradley, President; H. D. Coon, Wm. M. Williamson. 

1801-2. H. J. Bradley, Wm, M. Williamson, J. U. Adams. 

1802-3. Wm. M. Williamson, Preaidenl; S. S. Johnson, J. H. Adams. 
Board held until March, 1804. 

Jlnrcb, 1804, to 1806. J. A. Quinby, I'rcgldeiil; Chapman Yntos, L. 
Robinson, J. A. Perkins, Frank Sleeper. 

1800-7. J. A. Quinby, President; Frank Steeper, John A. Perkins, 
J. Q. A. Bailou, John Cook. This Board held over until I8G8, as there 
was no election in 1860. 

1868-0. John Cook, PreiiiUni ; W. C. Hull, W. H. Patton, David 
Campbell, J. tj. A. Bailou [Oliver Cattle, elected April IS, 1808, to fill 
vacancy caused by resignation of Ballon]. 

1870-2. W. H. Patton, President; Samuel J. Jamison, J. M. Buttee, 
David Campbell, W. U. Hall. 

1872-4. J. M. Battco, President; Wm. Paul, J, W. Boulware, W. 
N. Furlong, S, J, Jamison. 

1874-0, W. N. Furlong, Presiilenl; Wm. Paul, J. W. Boulware, 
Abram Xing, A. Chew, H. M. Leonard, S. J. Jamison. 

From April, 187G. H. M. Leonard, Preaident; J. M. Bailee, W. N. 
Furlong, Abram King, A. Cliow, S. F. Ayor, W- H, Rogers. 

CHURCH STATISTICS. 

SMcmenl of the Value of C/mrcli Property in Santa Clara Counti/, as 
shauin by the Assessment Roll of 1875-0. 

METHODIST EPISCOPAL CIIURCIT. 

Los Gains $450.00 

Santa Clara Township 800.00 

Santa Clara 530.00 

Santa Clnra 0,800.70 

San JosiJ 10,500,00 

Mnyllcid - 1,800.00 

Gilroy 2,700.00 

Total 523,140.00 

University of the Pncillc 17,400.00 

Total $40,540.00 

>[. K. OnURCII SOOTH. 

Redwood Township §270.00 

San Josfi 1,000.00 

Snntn Clara (150.00 

Fremont Township , 1,075,00 

Oilr-iy 2,-IOO.OO 

'I'otnl S5,8BC.0O 



OATHOITC CaURCH. 

San Jose §03,800.00 

Maylleld 1,300.00 

Jliiuntain View 1,150,00 

Miipitas 1,000.00 

Cemelery near Kell's 500.00 

Total $07,810.00 

College of Notro Dame 137,440 00 

Santa Olara College [qj ggQQij 

I'otal Si300,61o!oo 

PBBMBYTERIAK CHURCH. 

Sanln Olarn Township $800.00 

San Josfi 11,000.00 

Santa Clara 2,300.00 

Gilroy 1,400.00 

MilpJlfls 1,150.00 — ^ 

'J'"'''' 516,050,00 

nAI'TIBT CUURCH. 

San Josi* $0,100.00 

Simla Clara 1,200.00 , 

Total 87,800.00 

CHRISTIAN cnuRuu. 

Santa Clara S1,I00,00 

Gilroy 1,000.00 

T^'ol"! ■ $2,100.00 

.MISOEJ.LAKEOUS. 

German Mclhodial, Siin Josfi S5,050.00 

2ion " ■' 800,00 

Trinity " " la.lOO.OO 

Cumberland Presbyterian, Fremont 950,00 

I'otn' ■ 520,410.00 

Grand total §.108,005.00 

POST-OFFICES IN SANTA CLARA COUNTY. 

Alma, Alviso, Hell's Station, Burnett, Evergreen, Gilroy, Gilroy Hot 
Springs, Los Gatoa, 3lnylield, Mountain View, New Almadcn, Patchin, 
Pioneer, .San Felijie, San Jose, Santa Clara, San Ysidro, Saratoga, Sar- 
gent, Sherman, Tennant. 

THE CITY OF SAN JOSE. 

Tho history of Santa Clara County and that of the city of San JoaoUre 
so blended that we have carried both along together up to 1858. We 
have seen that the original survey of the Pueblo contained four square 
leagues of land, but this was afterward} stretched until the final confirm- 
ation of the Pueblo land.s to the city gave a tn.ct eleven and a half lengaes 
long and two leagues and eight hundred acres wide. This hind lias been 
sold by the city to aetnal settlers, and the proceeds have gone into the 
selmol funds of the city. The original limits of Ibe city have been ei- 
tcndod from time to time until they have reached their present dimen- 
sions, and the huts and tents of ISIG have given way to solid brick 
business blocks and magnificent mansion-houses, 

.At that time the principal hotels were tho Mansion House, situated 
about where JIusic Hall now stands, the French Hotel, on Market Street, 
and Price's Hotel, at the corner of Pirsl and San Fernando SlreeLi. 

On the 11th of April, 1853, J. D. Happe, Martin Murphy, Chas. 
White, and several other of the most prominent citizens of Sdn Josf 
were killed by the explosion of the boiler of the steamer "Jenny Lind." 
They bad taken passage at Alviso for San Francisco, and when about 
opjwsite tho Fulgoj Ranche the disaster occurred. The event cast a deep 
gloom over the whole community. 

The election in tho fall of ibis year showed eight hundred and flfty- 
Ihrce votcj cast In tbc cnlire township. About one hundred houses were 
built this year, among which were the Mariposa store building, on Mar- 
ket Street, Ihe brick dwelling-houso near the corner of Fifth and St. 
John Streets, and the building at the southeast corner of Santa L'hira 
Street and Pucheco Alley. The City Hall building was completed in 
April, 1806, It wa? built under the impre^^ion that Sun Jose would soon 
again be the capital of tho State, and it was constructed with a view to 
its possible use us a slate-house. Levi Goodrich was the arcliitect. 

In 1858, the number of children within tho city limits between the 
ages of four and eighteen years was 275 boys and 396 girls; there were 
245 children under four years of age. 

In March, 1859, a memorable nfl'ray occurred nt tbo corner of Second *■ 
and San Fernando Streets, in which Samuel J. Crosby and L. Posey Fer- 
guson were killed ; the lattor's death was caused by a random ball that 
cnmo straggling into the conrl-housc. During this year, Horace Gree- 
loy nnd Bayard Taylor lectured in San Josf. Tho first theatre building 
in the city was erected in 1859, by James Slnrl;. It was located on First 
Street, boiwecn Santji Clara and St. John, it svas opened with " Riche- 
lieu," on tho evening of the lOlh of October. Murphy's Block was buili 
this year. 

In 1801, the city having secured railroad communication with San 
Francisco, business took >\ new start, nnd the work of improving tho eiiy 
was pushed with vigor. In 1808 the Auzerais House was buill, Theodore 
Lenzen being the nrchilecl. The city's debt at ihebeginuing of this year 
was twenty-five thousand dolurs. Tim flonsley Block was built in 18C4. 
In 1865 the Knox BlocI; was completed, as was also Iho Ilyland Block, at 
thocorner of First and San Fernando Streets. During this year iho enliro 
indebtedness of tho cily was liquidated. From 1861 lo 18Gl> tho increase 
of population was greater than during the preceding fifteen years. 

The block at the sonlli west corner of Santa Chira and First Streets was 
erected hy JI. Levy, in 1307; the building nt tho nortbonst corner of 
Santa Clnra nnd Market Streets was built in 1869. The Bank of San 
Jose building and llm Commercial Btink building were orecled in 1872. 
The Central Marl;et was built in 1871, and the Cily Jlarkct in 1S72. 
Tlie Urit nspltaltuin pavenuint was that on Iho north side of Santa Clara 
Street, nnd was laid in 1870. The San Jn^e Opera-Uou.'U wii' opened 
August 18, 1870, with thn play of "London A^uranec." 
Tho cily dircotory, published in 1S7G, gives the names of five thousand 



lo 



eight hundred nod neventj-rour n'lult actual residents in Son Jos^. Tbig 
indii:ii(e8 n prnwnt population of about acvenlcun tboiuund. 

STREETS. 

Sun JuE'i hue about one hundred and twontjr miles o{ atrecLi. The 
]^«nernl width ifl eighty feet, with fiftecit-rect eidewulks. Fifth Street i« 
•inu liiindrcd fuct wide, nilhurlo they have been constructed on aa e»- 
tublinhtd grnde, with eurbji und gutter plnnkt, Biid covered with gravel 
|i> II depth of ten inches in the eenlro ond 8vo Inches al the curb. The 
iivurugocosLofBtrcDt improvcmonl is one dollar and fifty cents per lincfll 

fool, 

CEMETElllES. 

The first burying-gtound wus kid out in 1847, near tlie corner of 
Ulevoiith and Wiltiflm StreeLa But few peraone were interred there, Iho 
'jcinetory having boon rumuved in 1848 to Oak Hill, its present location, 
about three milea loiith of the city, un the Munleroy road. It now com- 
jirisea ii tract of about fifty neroa. It is well laid out find is kept in good 
order. 

STREET BAILKOADS, 

The San JoiG nnd Santa Clam Horiie Rtiilroad was incorpornted in 
18G8, and the road wus built thai year; in 1869 it was extended cast- 
wardly lo the Coyote Creek. The original officers wore: 8. A. Bishop, 
I'residont; J. H. Moore, Treasurer, and Chas. Silent, Secrolnry. Tho 
firnl Btreet hurao rallroiid waa built in 1872, the incorporators being S. 
A, Bishop, P. 0. Hliior, and A. L. Rhodea. The North Side HortB Rail- 
mad, ciinnccling the inti'recctinn of First und tit, John Streetj with the 
nortbenatorn city limiU, was hullt in 1875. Utivin Divine was tho first 
I'residont, Two otber street rnilrnads are projected, one running south 
lo tho cemetery, und one sotith into the section of country known as tho 
Willows. 

BANKS. 

San Jo?6 baa four incorporated banking inatitutiona, aa follows : 

Tho Bank of San Job6, calahlialied Miireh 12, IBOG ; incorporated Jan- 
uury 81, 18G8. Original capital, §100,000; capital Increased March 20, 
ISmi, lo $250,000; aurpiua Jan. 12, 187G, 881,840.07. Total capital 
and surplus, $331,848.07. Value of real estate and improvenienta, 
8120,000. Presidents, John G. Bray to February 14, 1871; Adolph 
Pflsler lo August i, 1871 ; T. Ellard Bcana from August 4, 1671, to 
present time. 

Kan Josfi Savings Bank, incorporated Jan. 15, 1868; capital otoclt, 
?100,000, increased to §600,000 July 1, 1876, Vuluo of real estate and 
iniprovornenls owned by the bank, §54,000. Presidents since organiza- 
tion, James 0. Oobb, now docensod, and John H. Mooro, proGcnt incum- 
bent. 

Commercial and Savings Bank, incorporated May 8, 1874, Amount of 
capital slock, §1,000,000; President, 0. T. Ryland. 

Farmers' National Gold Blink, incorporated July 11, 1874. Authorized 
etipilftl, §1,000,000; paid up capital, $600,000 ; value of real estate and 
improvomenls, §90,000; Prcaidont, J. W. Hoinds. 

SAN J036 LIBRARY ASSOCIATION. 

Incorporated July 11, 1872; Library open to the public, Sept. 10, 1872. 
This institution ia supported by dues from members. It occupies two 
rooms in Knox's Block, one of which is sixty hy twenty feet, tho other 
furlv by flfieen feet. Tho membership is as follows : 

Annual members, 180; monthly, 180; lifo mombers, 21; honorary 
uiombers, 12. Number of volumes in the Library, 4200 ; number of vol- 
umes circulated per annum, 14,000. Since tho organization of tho Li- 
brary, the JEayors of tho city have donated their salary toward ib 
support, lliis prccedont having been established by Mr. Adolph Pfistcr. 
5[r. PDsler also donated one thousand dollars in addition to his salary, 
which was sot apart as tho nucleus uf n building fund. This fund 
amounts now to fourteen hundred and sisty-four dollars. 

Jlr. Pflster was the first President of tho Association, and has held 
that position over Since. George W. Fentress has been Librarian since 
tho orgrtnizalion of the society. 

Tho San Josi Law Library waa organized in 1873, and is supported by 
subscriptions and by a tax of one dollar on each litigant who files a com- 
plaint in either tho District or County Court. 

PUBLIC SCHOOLS. 
"Wo have given an account of tho first public schools established in San 
Jos6. They were then two in number, occupied rented rooms, and em- 
ployed two tcuehors. Now, tliero are nine schools, employing thirty- 
seven teacbora, and occupying magnificent buildings built oipressly for 
thoir use, and owned by the city. 

Tho teachers receive salaries ranging from seventy to ono hundred 
and fifty dollars per montb. Tho school census shows that in 1875 tho 
number of school children between tho ages of five and seventeen years 
was 2809, of which 38 were colored and 4 Indian. Tho average at- 
tondanoo during Iho year was about 1400. Tho revenue of the school 
department during tbo year was $60,147, and the expense, exclusive of 
amount spent for building, was 300,325. Tho prineipiil school buildings 
are — 

Tbo Sanla Clara Street school-house, built in 1867, at a cost of twenty 
thousand dollars. Levi Goodrich architect, and Thomas Cook builder. 

Reed Street Bchool-bouse, built in 1870, at a cost of flfteen thousand 
oigbt hundred and sixty-eight dollars. Victor Iloft'man architect, L. 
Thorkelaon contractor. 

Fourth Ward scbool-honse, built in 1874, at a coat of seventeen thou- 
sand dollars. Levi Goodrich architect, C. "W. Cook contractor. 

First Ward school-house, built in 1675, at a coat of eighteen thousand 
dollars. Levi Goodrich architect, and E. A. Vandalsen contraetor. 

All of these buildings aro magniflcent structures,— large, commodious, 
nnd convenient- Views of each of them will bo found in another part 
of tho Atlas. In addition lo Ihcao buildings there aro five smaller ones, 
located in different parts of tho city, for the accommodation of pupils in 
tho primary grades. 



ART ASSOCIATION. 

The B»n Jos6 Art Association was orguniwd in tho early part of 1875 
by u number of local artists, since which liroo meetings have been held 
each fortnight. The society numbers eighty members. Tho first public 
cxhibilion was held by this society in the latter part of May, 18711. The 
ultimate object of the society Is the titablidhmenl of an art school in San 
Joei. 

CHURCHES. 

The following denominations have congregations in Snn Jose: Bap- 
tiala, Christians, Congregotionalists, Cumberland Presbyterians, Metho- 
dist Episcopal, German SIclhodists, Methodist Episcopal Church South, 
Methodist Episcopal Church (colored), Presbyterian, Catholics {two 
parishes, SL Joseph's and St. Patrick's), Episcopalian, Unilcd Pres- 
byterians, Unitarians, Soventh-Day Advoniists, Friends, and the Hebrew 
Congrcgalion of Bickur Cholin. All of these have bouses of worship 
with tho exception of Ihe Cbristinns, Seventh-Day AdventiaU, United 
Frcibytorians, and Uaitarians, who hold their meetings in dillerent halts 
in tho city. Tho St. Joseph's Catbolie Church was burned in the spring 
of 1875, and a magnificent now brick edifice is now being creeled, at a 
cost of ono hundred thousand dollars. A view of this building, taken 
from tho accepted plan, can bo scon in another portion of the Atlas. 

SOCIETIES. 
Tho following societies are represented in San Josi: 
jVcHonie.— San JosiS Lodge, No. 10; S. W. Boring, W. M. Friendship 
Lodge, No. 210 ; H. N. Andrews, W. M. Electa Chapter, Order of tho 
Eastern Star, No. 15i H. H. Cook, W. P. Howard Chapter, No. 14, R. 
A. M.i M. E. Wilcox, M. B. H. P. San Joa() Commandery, No. 10, 
Knights Templar; S. W. Boring, E. 0. 

/. 0. 0. F.— San Josfi Encampment, No. 35; C. L. W. Sikes, C. P. 
San Jose Lodge, No, 84; W. 0. Wilson, N. G. Garden Oily Lodge, 
No. 142 ; H. T. Welch, N. G. Stella Rebekah Degree Lodge, No. 22 ; D. 
J. Porter, N. G. Allomnnia Lodge, No. 178; George C. Frick, N. G. 
Franco-Italian Lodge, J. Jaequelin, N. G. 

n. A. 0. i>.— San Jos* Grove, No. 23 ; A. H. Schnoder, J. P. A. Unity 
Grove, No. 27 ; J. "Wondorlich, J. P. A. 

/. 0. Ii. ilf.— San Josu Stamm, No. 77 ; John Philipps, Overchief. 

/. 0. D'nai J5i-i(/i.— Ariel Lodge, No. 248 ; M. Blumonthall, President. 

A. 0. a. — San Joso Division, No. 11 ; John Johnson, President. 

JaiiUsarics of Light; J. B. Cox, B. of C, 

Patrom of Ilmbmidry.—^aa Jos 6 Grange, No. 10; C. T. Settle, Master. 

Champions of ilie Red Cross.— San Joafi Encampment, No. 12 ; Georgo 
Folherstuno, Commander. California Encampmont, No. 49 ; B. R. Fuss, 
Commander. 

/. 0. G. r.— District Lodge; D. E, Buahnoll, D. D. G. 

Granger Lodge, No. 295; W. S. Boyles, W. C. T. 

San Joafi Board of Trade ; G. B. McKco, President, 

St. Joseph's Benevolent Sooioty ; James Hagan, Prosident. 

Austrian Benevolent Society; F. Fozzo, President. 

San Josd Turnvorien ; Charles Doorr, President. 

Gcrmania Verien; 11, Pago, Preaidont. 

Handel and Haydn Muaical Society ; Elliott Reed, President. 

Philharmonic Musical Society ; A. N. Hamm, President. 

Adolphi Social Club; D. Dclmas, President. 

Leoticonian Literary Socioty ; H. C. Gcsford, President. 

Baa Josti Zouaves ; F. Pillot, Captain. 

SEWERAGE. 

In 1870 the City Surveyor, by order of tho Common Council, perfected 
n system of aowcrage for the city of San Josfi. The plan consisted of a 
main sewer, to orlend along Seventh Street through tbo northern city 
limits, and thence to tho Guadalupo River, with branch sewers connecting 
»l each of the cross streets. Tho plan was elaborate in iu details, and 
met with the general approval of tho Council; but as yet tho city has 
made no provision for its construction. 

The estimated price of the main sower, constructed of brick, is about 
one hundred thousand dollars. Tho fall from the inlerseclion of San 
Fernando Street to the point of debouehement at the Guadalupo is some- 
thing over fifty feet, and would admit of tho main sewer being placed at a 
depth of from fifteen to twenty foot, and by the aid of branch sowers 
would givo perfect drainage for the whole eily for all time to come. 

GAS. 

Tho San Joa6 Gas Company was incorporated 1860, and finished their 
works <tnd turned the first gas into [heir mains in January, 1861. Tho 
consumption for tho first year was 05,000 feet. For tho year 1870 the 
consumption was 3,961,270 feet. In 1875 the consumption was about 
6,000,000 feet. The works of the company are situated on Third Street, 
between Santa Clara and San Fernando Streets. 

The original charter expired in 1875, when it was extended ono year. 
The price of gas at first was ton dollars per thousand feet, and now it is 
five dollars, 

WATER. 

In addition to the artesian wells, the city is supplied by tho San Joso 
Water Company. This company was incorporated in 18G6, with a capi- 
tal of ono hundred thousand dollara, by Donald McKcnzio and John 
Bonner, of San Josu, and A. Chabot, of Oakland ; their franchise run- 
ning for twenty-five years. Their first works wore located at the southeast 
corner of Market and San Antonia Streets, whore water wus pumped 
from arlosian wells into tanka, and thence distributed throughout the 
city. In 13G8 tho company obtained the franchise for the uso of tho 
water of the Loa Gatos Creek. Tho company was reorganized, ond tho 
capital increased to three hundred thou.sand dollara. The stream was 
tapped at a point in the mountains about two miles above Loa Gatos, 
and thence conducted by flumes nnd pipes to tho reservoira, and thonco 
by main to San Joso. The works have a capacity of about flfteen million 
gallons, and supply both San Jo=6 and Santa Clara with water, having 
about forty-five miles of mains and pipes in San Joa6 alone. 



FIRE DEPARTMENT. 



Tho Fire Department of Sun Jofo wus organised in 1867, although 
several companies were in existence previous to that time; the oldest 
being the Hook-and-Ladder Company, organised in 1854. Empire Engine 
Company, No. 7, wus organized in the same year. 

Torrent Engine Company, No.-2, was organized in May, 1867 ; Frank- 
lin Engine Company in 1871; Eureka Company in 1876. Washington 
Hoae Company was organized in 1870, and disbnndetl in 1874. Tho other 
companies constitute the present Doparlmont. J. 0. Qeriics is Chief En- 
gineer. The Deparlraeut has two steam fire-engines, — ono a Silsby and 
ono u Clapp & Jones. It has also two hand-engines and an improved 
ladder-truck, with al! the appurtenanoo.'. Each company has a house of 
its own, all owned by the city. The cflcctivencss of the Department Is 
demonstrated by tho fact that no general conflagration has occurred since 
its organization. 

PLACES OF INTEREST. 
Sun Jos6 |)0S3csses too many bountiful buildings und grounds to make 
detailed mention possible in a work of this character. There are several, 
however, so prominent that they cannot be passed by insilenco. Among 
these we note tho elegant grounds now owned by Mrs. Samuel J. Hena- 
ley, on First Street. These grounds wcro laid out in 1853, by Mr. Jamea 
R. Lowe, Jr., an eminent Engliab landi^capo gardener, who was employed 
for that purpose by Major Henalcy. Tho premises contain about twenty- 
five acres, and are brought to tho highest slato of improvement that money 
run command or skill suggeat. Tho trees, shrubbery, and plants havo 
been gathered from all parts of Ihe world, and shosv the possibilities of 
our climate in Ihe way of vegetation. Tho a]iple-trce, tho magnolia, tbo 
fuchsia, tho jessamine, orange, heliotrope, the rose, the hickory-lree, tbo 
walnut, tho almond, the maple, all thrive equally well. Tho grounds aro 
interspersed with fountains, which add to tho enchantment. A view of 
thcso promises will be found eisowbcro, 

Tho grounds of General Naglee were laid out in 18G5. This tract uf 
one hundred and forty acres extends from Elevonth Street to tho Coyote, 
and from SanlJi Clara Street to William Street. The General has expended 
about one hundred and fifty thousand dollars in the improvement of thoso 
premises. They aro beautifully laid out and well improved. 

O'Donnell's Botanical and Zoological Gardens aro located on William 
Street, near Tenth Street. They were Inid out about flflcon years ago, 
but were only opened as a place of public resort in 1876. They contain ii 
largo variety of choice shrubs and plants, besides nnicb else to inlere.it 
tho viaitor. 

Live-Onk Park, located in tbo southcaslern portion of the city, is a 
beautiful Efo^^i '""^ much used aa a place of public resort. 

St. James' Square, lying between First and Third Streets, aad Market 
Pla/.a, both public squares, aro beautifully laid out and ornamented, and 
furnish a pleasant resort for tho people. 

San Jos£ for several years, by the beauty of its location, tho mildness 
of its climate, its case of access, and its superior educational advimtages, 
has attracted to it a large number of wealthy men from all portions of 
the country. Those persons have built palatial dwellings und adorned 
their grounds, so that thoy have bccomo the rule throughout the city. 

EAST SAN JOSg 

is one of the suburbs of San Josu, adjoining tbo city on the east. It was 
laid out in 1868 on tho homestead plan. It now contains about two hun- 
dred and fifty inhabitants, and is provided with an excellent school. 

Tabular StaUmmt of the Toiala of Aisesament Botls of the City of San 
Jose ! also, the Amount of Tax temedfor the Years 1874-5. 

Value of land SB,947,228.00 

" improvements on land 2,019,790,00 

II " assessed to others than owners 16,130.00 

" personal property t 3,147,519.00 

Amount of money 311,964,00 

Total valuotion of all property 10,091,1561.00 

" " " after equalization 10,991,651.00 

Tax levied 82,487.39 

PUEBLO LANDS OF SAN JOS£. 

Field'Notea of ihe Exterior Boundaries of the Pueblo Lands of San Josi, 
iiiitated in the County of Santa Clara, and finally confirmed to the City 
of San Josi. Surveyed under Inairuetions from L. Upson, United Stnten 
Surveyor -Qeneral, by O. B. Thompson, Deputy-Surceyor. Saney cum' 
menced July 9, 1866, 

Commencing at a point on the Guadalupe Rivor as near as could ho 
ascertained where the last live-oak on said river was in Marcb, 18S8, and 
which is [be same point described in tho decree aa tho termination of tho 
northwest boundary lino of tho Pueblo Lands. (All traces of said tree 
aro now gone, but the puiril established is well known I o bo about tho 
point where it formerly stood.) At which point is set a redwood post, 
marked i' P. S. J. 1." Thence from " P. S. J. 1" in the direction of a 
live-oak tree in tho mountains, which is plainly seen from this point, N. 
Gip, E. 55i chains (variation 16° E.), to a live-onk about 20 inches in 
diameter, .standing on tho summit of a rocky chcmisal point on tho west 
side of the summit of the ridge. (This tree was pointed out as the tree 
described in tho decree as the point of beginning, or N. E. corner of said 
Pueblo Lands.) Said tree is also the N. E. corner of the Rancho Los 
Tularcitos, and is marked "T," Thonee from auid Irce, following tho 
line of tho Rancho Lo.s Tularcitos, as finally surveyed, S. 42° 20', E. 
176,60 chains, along tho top of Ihe ridge to a post in a stone mound, 
marked " T. No. 3," corner No. 8 of tho Raneho Tularcilus ; also, a post 
is set in tbo same mound, marked " P. S. J. 3 ;" thence leavini; the lino 
of the Rancho Los Tularcitos, and continuing along top of ridge S. 52', 
E. 400.68 ehaioB, intersecting the lino of the Rancho Cailada de Pala, 
46.00 chains 3., 61}° "W., from corner No. 3 of said Rancho, at which 
point of interaeclion is a post marked " P. S. J. 4 ;" thence through tho 
Rancho Canada de Pala S. Saj" E. 649.71 chains lo corner No. 7 of the 
Kanebo Canada do Pula, and corner of Sections 19, 20, 29, and 30 in 
Township 7S,| Range 3 E., a post being fixed in mound of Htono, marked 



16 

"P. S. J. 5." Tlicnce nlon^ Ibe hills called S;.n Felipe, lenving the 
Bunclio CoJiada de Pala, S. 24i°, E. 1134,10 chains, lo n Bionumcnt of 
■tone about sii feet high, and about eight feet at the base, on the iummit 
of o rocky hill iasido and near tho northern boundory of the Rnncho San 
Friinciico do Liu Llagai. (This monument was pointed out as the S. E. 
corner of the Pueblo Lands of Sua Jos*, nnd answers to tlie description 
of the tame given in the original survey and report of the Couiniisiioners, 
of Marfh, 183B,) Thence through the Bancho Son Francisco do Las 
Lliigaa, 8. yoj", W. CM.OO chains, to a post on a steep hillside, on tho 
north aide, and about flvo chains from tho head of branch of the Lns 
Llngas, marked "P, S. J. 9;" thence over rough, brushy iniiuntnin. 
through (he Eonebo Las Uvas, N. 58= 24', W- 1074.24 chains, to a Inrgo 
live-oak-lreo called "El Bncino," near the snmmil of ii high spur of tho 
Sierra?, which was pointed out and described as one of the original bound- 
aries of the Pueblo Lands of San Josfi; said tree is seven feet in diam- 
eter, and ia a very prominent landmark, marked "P. S. J. 11;" and 
running ihenco, doeccnding the steep side of the Sierras, N. lOJ", \V. 
333. 7C chains, lo a post in mound of stone, marked " P. S. J. 14," on tho 
summit of a emntl isolated hill in the valley. (This hill was pointed out 
as being the hill described in the decree, and in the Commissioners' re- 
port of 163B, and was at that time established as one of the boundaries of 
tho Pueblo Lands of San Joso.) Thence N. ISJ", E. 347.47 chains, lo a 
largo monument of stone in a willow swamp, at the source of tho Gnu- 
dalupo Bivor, one of tho original boundary monuments of the Pueblo 
Lands of San Joifi; a po^t is set in said monument of stone, marked "P. 
8. J, IB," and tho lino running thence through willow swamp, N. 72°, E 
10.12 chains, to Station No. IG of the Runcho Sau Juan Bantista, on the 
bank of tho Guedalupa River ; Ihunco general course northwesterly, with 
the meanders of the Guadalupe River, lo the point of beginning. 

Tho total number of square milc-i within tho lands conlirmod to the 
Puoblo is one hundred and one and seventy-six one-hundrcdtlis. 

THE TO'WN OF SANTA CLARA 

IG located three miles northwest of San JosS, and conlains about three 
thousand inhabitants. It takes its niimo from the old mission, which was 
the first settlement in the County, and the nucleus of the present town. 
Santa Claro has had a sort nf (own government from 1852, but it wus of 
no particular force until 18i!2, when a charter was obtained which dciincd 
the limits of the town, provided for schools, and deSncd thu duties of 
officers. This charter was amended in 18GG, and in 1872 tho present in- 
corporation was consummated. The town as it is at present laid out is 
two miles long and a mile and a bulf wide. It .takes its principal im- 
portance from tho fact that it is tho location of tho Snntu Clara College. 
It contains many beautiful residences, among which are thoso of Mr. 
Arguello and Mr. Pierce. Its schools are well conducted, and buvo ample 
accommodations. Its principal hotel, the Cameron House, is kept by 
Martin Corcoran, to whom reference hos previously been made in con- 
nection with tliQ battle of Santa Clara. It has one newspaper, the Santa 
Clara Echo. The Bank of Sunta Clara County ia located here. It was 
incorporated in 1675, with a capital of three hundred thousand dollars. 
Jnmes P, PJerco is Prosident, 

Tho Fire Departmonl consists of three companies, which ore provided 
with a hand-engine, a hook-and-lndder apparatus, and a " Babcock Es- 
tinguisher," respectively. 

The different societies are repreaonted as follows : 

/. 0. O. J".— Santa Clara Lodge, No. 62 j W- N. Squires, N. G. True 
Fellowship Lodge, -No. 238; E. T. Thorn, N. G. Santa Clara Encamp- 
ment, No. 32; Fred. Kington, C. P. 

Moionie. — Santa Glura Lodge, No. 34; "Wm. B. King.iiburj', W. M. 

Patrons of Himbandry.— Santa. Clara Grange, No. 71; J. A. Wilcox, 
Master. 

The Roman Catholics, Centenary MetliodiBts, Episcopalians, Baptists, 
"Westminster Presbyterions, Second Adventisls, and Christians all have 
congregations in Santa Clara. 

The Santa Claro school building is a handsome Btrueturo, flftj'-four by 
Boventy-six feet, two stories in height, and was erected in 1870, at n cost 
of twelve thousand five hundred dollars. Tho number of children of 
school age is about seven hundred. 

St. Mary's Academy is a school for girls, and is under the control of 
the Sisters of Notre Dame. The course of education embraces tho ordi- 
nary English branches. 

Quite a number of persona make their homos in Santa Clara whoso 
business is almost exclusively in San Jos£>. ' 

GILROY 

is locoUd about thirty miles south of Sun Josf , on the line of the Southern 
Pacific Railroad, and contains about two thousand population. It is tho 
centre of a very extensive and rich agricultural country, and contains the 
factories of tho Consolidated Tobacco Company, whoso fields are located 
in tho San Pelipo Valley. The surrounding country is devoted largely lo 
dairying, a business which has assumed largo proportions in this section 
of the country. Gilroy furnishes good school facilities. In addition to 
tho excellent public schools there are several private seminaries. Most 
prominent among these is tho Convent of the Immaculate Heart of 
Mary, established in 1871. This is an academy for young ladies. Tho 
principal building Is seventy-two by thirty feet, two stories high, and is 



calculated to accommodate thirty boarders and fifty day scholars. All 
the English branchea are taught, besides the Spanish and French lan- 
guages. 

Tho city is supplied with water by tho Qilruy Water Company, from 
an immense reservoir three miles from the city, to which point it is con- 
ducted from [ho U vas Creek, about seven miles from the city. 

Gilroy has one newspaper, tho Weekly AtiroeaU and Leader, published 
every Friday, by J. C. Slarlin. 

The Firo Deparlment conaisls of u force of about one hundred and fifty 
men, comprising a hand-ongioo, a hook-and-ladder, and a hose company. 

The Bank of Gilroy was incorporated June 5, 1871. with a capital of 
one hundred thousand dollars, which was increased in 1876 to two hun- 
dred thousand dollars. Tho first President was Thomas Eca ; tho present 
incumbent is J. C. Zuck. 

The societies are Keith Lodge, No. 187, F. and A. SI., and Gilroy 
Lodge, No. 104, I. 0. 0. F. 

The Catholic, Presbyterian, Episcopal, Methodist, Methodist South, 
and Christian congregations all have church edifices of their own. 

Tho city is lighted with gas. 

LOS GATOS. 

Tho town of Los Qatos was laid out in 1850 by J. A. Forbcp, who com- 
pleted Ihu flour-mill in 1654. This mill, which is the principal feature 
of the town, is a mntsive stone structure, fifty by seventy feet, and four 
stories in height; it is of cut granite, and cost over ono hundred thousand 
dollars. Tho enterprise failed in Forbos's hands, and passed into tlio 
hands of V. Marzion & Co., a French firm, who also failed. It was then 
rented by Pflster & Co. and others for a term of years, who found it un- 
profitable owing to tho lack of power for so largo a mill through the dry 
season. Up to 16B6 the power was two twonly-feet iron overshot wheels. 
In that year W. H. Rogers & Co. purchosod the jiroperty, and raised 
tho head to sixty foci, substituting turbine wheels for overshot. lu 1870 
tho head was raided lo two hundred feet, when tho power was found ample 
for all purposes. At that time the firm was incorporated under tho name 
of the "Los Gntos Sfunufaeturing Company," and a two-set woolen-mill 
was built; but it was destroyed by llro in June, 1874. The town is 
located about ten miles from San Joso, on the Santa Cruz road. It has 
a population of about flvo hundred. 

LEXINGTON 

is situated about two miles nbove Los Gatos, and is tho regular stopping- 
place for tho Sun Josti and Santa CruK stages. 

SARATOGA 

contains about two hundred inhabitants, and is located about three miles 
north of Los Gatos and ten miles from San Jos&. It is the location of 
ono branch of the Saratoga and Lick's Mills Paper Mills and of Sum- 
mervillo'a Pasteboard Mills. 

MOUNTAIN VIEW 
ia located about eight miles north of San Jo=S, and has a papulation of 
about three hundred. 

At ono time it promised to become a very flourishing Iowa, but wben 
tho railroad was built it missed tho town by about a mile, and the result 
was that another town sprung up at the railroad elation. It is surrounded 
by n fine agricultural country, and ia within two miles of Bay View Land- 
ing. It contains two hotels, a good school, churches, a public ball, and 
other buildings. To distinguish it from tho town at tho station, it is 
called Old Mountain View, 

MAYFIELD 
, was laid out by William Piiiii, in 18G7. It is a very handsome place, 
and is the centro of one of tho riuhest.purtions of Santa Clara Valley. 
It contains two hotels, sevenil dry goods and other stores, grain ware- 
houses, etc. It has an excolleal graded school and fine school buildings, 
several churches, and n fine hall. A public road was opened in 1874 to 
Scale's ombarcadero, on tho bay, which gives excellent facilities for trans- 
portation of produce by water, in addition to tho accommodations ofl'crcd 
by tho railroad. 

The " Ayrshire Farm," a view of which may be seen in this work, is 
situated one-half mile southwest from MayQcld. It comprises twelve 
hundred and forty-two acres of fine arable land, and is almost exclusively 
devoted to dairying and viniculture. Mr. Peter Coutts, the proprietor, 
has already spent an enormous sum of money in slocking and improving 
it, and bis plans lliat aro now being carried out will requiru much more. 
His herd of "Ayrshires" and "Holslein" callle is the finest in tho Slate, 
many of them coming directly from tho best herds in Europe. The most 
scrupulous neatness and order prevails throughout his e:(tensiva dairy 
and wino manufactory. The want of space forbids us giving a mora 
extended description of these premises. 

ALVISO 
is situated ai tho hoad of San Francisco Bay, about sovon miles north of 
San JosS, and was at ono time one of tho most important towns in this 
section of tho Stato,— it being tho shipping-point for all this aeetion of 



the country. But tho construction of the railroad changed tho current 
of travel and freight, and Alviso sunk into insignificance, except as a 
point of shipment for tho limited country which immediately surrounds 
it. For several seasons past a small steamer has plied between that point 
and San Francisco, carrying passengers, but mainly run for tho transpor- 
talion of strawborriea and other fruit, A narrow-gauge railroad is now 
being built between Bunbarton Point, in Alameda County, and Alviio 
and is projected into San Jos6. If this road in built, Alviso will again 
acquiro some of her former importance. 

MILPITAS 

is situated about seven miles northeast of San Jos£, on the Western Pacific 
Railroad. It has about thrco hundred inhabitants, a good school, two 
churches, a hotel, and Eoveral stores, and nn cxtensivo blacksmith and 
carriage shop. 

SANTA CLARA COUNTY STATISTICS. 

Tlio following tables, from the San Josfi Daily Mercury, July fl, 1870, 
represent tho produoU of tho County, as compiled from the books uf llio 
Assessor, for tho year 1675: 

AGRICULTURAL. 

Land, inclosed in 1875, acres 6I8,8(>0 

Land, cultivated in 1875, acres 210,234 

Wheat, acres 170, 8<8 

Wheat, bushels I|G37,fla2 

Barley, acres 12,081 

Barley, bushels 104]805 

Oats, acres 7a(j 

Oats, bushels 12,(161 

Rye, acres 172 

Rye, bushels 3,127 

Corn, acres njg 

Corn, bushels G,7ilO 

Peas, acres 1q 

Peas, bushels 104 

Beans, acres (j 

Beans, bushels 70 

Potatoes, acres 21)3 

Potatoes, tons fi,530 

Sweet potatoes, acres 10 

Sweet potatoes, tons q\ 

Onions, acres 53 

Onions, bushels 5,0il2 

Hay, acres ; 27,081 

Hay, tons 43,780 

Flax, acres 1,277 

Flax, pounds 57,000 

'Hops, acres 2G0 

Hops, pounds 870,280 

Tobacco, acres 493 

Tobacco, pounds 750,000 

Butter, pounds 92,2!ll 

Cheese, pounds 523,879 

Wool, poiinds 90, 000 

Honey, pounds 1,402 

FRUIT. 

Value of fruit crop §201,920 

Bearing lomon-trccs 1,142 

Bearing orango-treca 3,293 

Bearing olive-trees 2,012 

Acres of grape-vines 2,034 

Wine, gallons 182,932 

Brandy, gallons 45,600 

LIVE-STOCK. 

Horses 10,850 

Mules 9G4 

Total number horned cattle 34,013 

Sheep 34,981 

Cashmere and Angora goals 313 

Hogs 8,647 

IMPROVEMENTS, 

Grist-Mills 5 

Steam-power 4 

Water-power 1 

Barrels of flour made 73,654 

Bufliels of corn ground 3,801 

Saw-Mills 3 

Steam-power 2 

Water-power 1 

Lumber sawed, feet 13,197.230 

Shingles made I,:i37,000 

MISCELLANEOUS. 

Breweries 7 

Per annum, gallons 3,600,000 

Woolen-Mills 1 

Pounds of wool used 101,710 

Railrouds 5 

Miles in length 74 J 

Assessed value of real estate in 187G $19,316,538 

Assessed value of improvements on do S4,ST5,209 

Assessed value of personal property do §6,710,839 

Estimated total population do.... 36,000 

Regislered voters 8,967 



nil 

GOVERNORS OF THE COLONY, TERRITORY, AND STATE OF CALIFORNIA, FROM THE YEAR 1767 TO 1875. 



SPANISH GOVERNORS, 



Giupar do Portalii„ 1707 



Yura. 



Fran Td 



Fulfpo Biirri 

FolifiG (Jo Novo , 

Vciiro Fiigct 

■!<M Arit'inio Komcn ..... 

Jnio Jun'juin i]i! Arrillagu. 

Dii^K" ^0 lioricfi 

Jdsii Jouquin c]b ArrillngH.. 

Jutu Ar^ucllo 

Publn Vinwnti do Soiii 



1707 


1771 


1771 


1774 


177* 


1782 


nsa 


1790 


17Q0 


i7oa 


1702 


1791 


17114 


1800 


1800 


18U 


18U 


1816 


1815 


1822 



lEXICMN GOVERNORS. 



Fublo Vinccnte de Sola 

Luis Argufllo.. , 

Joiu }iIariH Kchcandia. 

Blanuel YJctoriii 

Plol'ico 

Jofij FigucrOH 

Jqi>6 Unftri) 

Nicholas Giiitcrrcz 

Marinno Chico 

Nicliolus GuiUrru;! 

Junn B. Alvarndo 

Manuel Micholtorcnn.. 
Pio Pico 



Yean. 



Ffom To 



1822 


1823 


1823 


1825 


1825 


1881 


1831 


1832 


1882 


1833 


1833 


1836 


1835 


183li 


183G 




1836 




lSli6 




1836 


1842 


1842 


1845 


1846 


1846 



AMERICAN HIUTARV GOVERNORS. 



Commodore John D. Slont 1846 

Cotnrnodoro Robert F. Stockl.m 1846 



Veir. 



Colonel John C. FromonL. 
General Stenhen W, Kearney. 

Colonel Itictiurd B. Mnsc-n 

General BcnnDLt Riley 



1847 
1847 
1847 

1849 



STATE GOVERNORS. 



•Peter 11. Burnett. 
John McDoiignll.... 

John Biglur 

J. Nouloy Jolmfon. 

John B. Wellcr 

•Milton S. Liithnm 
John G. Downev.... 
Iicland Stanrorct.... 
t Frederick F. Low 
Henry B. Hiiight.. 

•Newton Boolli 

Rnmnuldo Pncheco. 
WiBiain Irwin 



Yeif. 



1849 
1861 
1852 
1856 
1868 
18G0 
1860 
18Q2 
1868 
1867 
1871 
1875 
187C 



• BdlfSMl. 



t TcnD ill bSco [ucreurd trom two to roDr^on. 



OFFICERS OF SANTA CLARA COUNTY FROM THE YEAR 1850 UNTIL 1876, 



Vmt. Stalg Senitor. 



IMl 
1EA3 

i&M 

18D$ 
1B6D 

im 

leiio 

IBBI 
IM'l 
lEU 
ISG4 
UBS 
1850 
1807 

leas 
leijB 

1 670 
1871' 

iS7:i 

1S73 
IBTl 



Jit COB Okiwui.. 

Hhonnan Diy. 

HuiUiL B, Heu. 

B. A. Iti!i1rii>a. 

' A. L. Jtlindci. 

J. 8. IValHi, 
IVia^ilcSrarlry. 



Cliu, JlDclnJ. 



•Til U.U.Lai no. 
(T. 11. Lfllno 
li"liJ« ovpr.) 

W. Z. AugiiDj. 



Aiiimbljineni 



II. O.BcDlin. 

O. T. Iljriiinii. 
aEouaEriu.ic. 

Ma A. Qtimby. 

J, r. SprtngiT. 
J. ai.Wllllumt. 

1/. W-llTi-JQI. 

C. AtactiA]^. 
J, J, OiCfn. 
do. 

John Zuti, 

0. T. HrlttPid. 

W.B.Sboemnkci 

P. h'. Siitncrr. 

TliaLRta. - 

Cyrui Jona. 



W. B. LnrciiEn. 
W. R. (ioPI«. 
Cruucll Vatl: 
.Voaft AjfmfT, 
W. W, KIcCu*. 
R. 0. TiillT. 
U. I). ItalJrv. 
J. II. Jforgu'i. 
Jia, }'. flnnon. 
J, W. Oiftn. 



John Zuch. 

D. W. Um-insior. 



If.b.VanBtliaict inn. £rbPn. 
J.il.Coty. A.U.BunL 

J, n. SlDoro. W. Z. AngHoy. 
' S. D. IlDrplijr. TL«. R. Tbomu. 
J. P. BarQtnl. F. C. FraMt. 
F. C. Fraud!. 'Ali-x. UiJ. 



L. Arcliflr. 



S. I.'JjunlKD. D. S. Pajna. 



County ludge. 



J. W. Bedmui. 



B. B. DOCENKK. 



I. jV. tlmUr. 
I. K. Scaler. 



D. 8. rnynt. 



County Clerk. 



ir. 0. Ueloxi. 

JDIIND. llEWEOX 

Joliiill.nrnsoK. 
Joliii D, Iluwion. 
JubnB. Ubwioo. 
J. A . Ctas/lim. 

do. 
A, E. Ffmtral/, 

J. B- HCVTIDD. 

J. M.LItllefleliJ. 

Oamcliai Fintt]/. 

Ho. 

J. J. SmAelmtr. 



Co, Treat urer. 



Vfu. Akemi ud. 

F. K. APPLtTO.V. 
CoBNKL YtOtB. 

F. O. APfLcrosi. 
n. C. Melon 0. 
IL CIIelonB. 

C. }V. ftBKrov. 

do. 
A. IteCatl. 
Thn. FnllDti. 
M. Coicoinn. 

do. 

D. C. Bailiii. 



County Aiiessor. County Recorder. County Surveyor. County AllornBy. 



T. 9. Bdhhitt. 

J, II. UOHOIS. 

W. GjiLiiiioni!. 
J. O. Blamii. 

w. n. rsiion. 

W. B. DbiI». 
D. 31. naniHxlil, 

do. 

IK O. Earkir. 
Ilsnry Diclpi. 

do. 
T. nr. littls. 



Wm. A. JaouRTj. IloDry Fbelpa. 



S. A. CunK. 
S, A, CuQi;. 
A.ai,Tlioni]nna. 
JalinB.miiOD. 
L. a. BoiUck. 
it. LtavcnmoTOi. 

dD. 
J. R. JatuKon. 

do. 
D. C. Bailil/. 
Wa. J. Colalian, 



W. J. Loitb. 

L. D. IIULEC. 

O. T, Hi'nluj. 
C. T. Jltnley. 

JiiAn neti. 

A. D. IWIff. 
J. J. Bowen. 
A. IT. Pukor. 

do. 

A. T. Htrnnann. 

du. 



J. II, aioosK. 
ds. 

J. JI. \VlLlliH3. 

J. A. ToPll. 
A.L.Jihoia. 
F. E. BjaictT. 
F. B. Epaieer. 
D. ir./ftmnutoi 
S. U. Delmoa. 
J. U. 'WDIInnu. 
J. O. Blach 
•Tlioi. Bodly. 



Wm.B. Uaidf. Jolin CoDlbo. Wn). M.Lotnll. B. JtouiMiii). K. R. llBtill. J«red Torn 



Supl. SchDoll. 



FUtEHtK GaTFJI. 

tl. Sllldiull. 
u. iniciitU. 
S. s. wau. 

Waley nnnir. 

do. 
J.n.Rnily. 
N. Furlong. 
a. F. Baler. 
"J, Q. Kiinncdy. 



Sherim 



iTohD YoDti. 

WH.lIcCtrTcrits. 
P. T. SIcColw. 
J. U. Uucpli}-. 
J. U, UuipbT. 
J.T. Ktnnidy. 
J. II. Adaa: 

do. 

do. 
x. R. aanU. 

J. n. Aiomi. 
do, 



Conner. 



AiA Fiulkt. 
II. P.Snxis. 

T. J. IiigrnoU. 
T. J.Ingcnoll, 
JaeA AUm. 
A. J. Oiry. 

da. 
J.Tuniur. 
h. Rolilnion. 
A. J. Cfiri;. 

do. 



Tu CollKtor. 



Pub. A dmlnl lira- 
tor. 



do. 

D. J. JJiinitU. 
11. Carcomii. 

do, 

do. 
J. U. Morgan. 



Wm.A.Jnnniirj. Jirtd Turner. 



Tnoi. OlVJBitt. 
F. D. 1 1 An KIM. 

CUBHIt. YrOER. 
A. D. OxlDHELl. 

A. B. Ciild«olI, 
Jd<. II, Klnculil, 
Wui. Dnolols, 

ffomy irudA. 

Joha Erlaoa. 

W.W.Lavirtnct. 

Wm.SLLovelt. 

J. SLSnlorunl. 

J. B. afuTHiin. 

E. W. BarriKii. 



IlomocnU, romnn; TVbigK, iuali. capitals ; Bu[iub1lciiiii,iful/a; Indfpgudcnli ■ 



" Tfoui July 18, 1871, lo Jnnuarj 1, 1B7!, B. I. Burnett wna Connty Judgo rlea h. Archer, rcilgnsd. 



CITY GOVERNMENT OF SAN JOSE, FROM THE TIME OF ITS ORGANIZATION UNDER CHARTER OF THE 

STATE, IN THE YEAR 1850, UNTIL 1876. 






Year. 



IB-W 
IMlt 
186-2 
18,^3 

}soi 

IBM 

issn 

ISST 

18 

idis; 
nm 
leai 

160S 
1803 

leM 
leoj 

ISDG 

laoi 

1603 
18fiO 
1870 
1871 
1872 

isia 

IGTl 
1S7S 
1B7S 



Mayor. 



Ji^nUll Uelddii. 
TliM. W. WlllW. 

do. 

do. 

do. 

S. O. llaiighlDll. 
" runcoArclior, 
B. C. Mimly. 
I'. O. Jllncr. 
Tl^umiiB Kalian. 
K. U.UuckniT. 
J. W. Juhnwn, 

da. 
J. A. Qulmby. 



D. D. Uuiphy. 



CJeili. 



Thoa. U. Gndaon. 
Jotrpb SlmpgoD. 
B. V. Be Hi. 



do. 

do. 
Cbipman Vatu. 

du. 
William II. Dnili. 
J. V. TItdall. 
J. |{.LoHC,Jr. 

do. 
J. T. Culibnn. 



Tmiurer, 



¥. Ugblilou. 
A. J.TnH.«. 

Thoi. Vcrmali. 



V. B. Sloody. 

do. 
a Ynlcs. 

do. 

<Ia. 

do. 
II. 0. Wollot. 

do. 
0. Yolcj. 
W. A. Janunry. 

do. 

do. 

do. 
J.A. Lolz. 



Attorney. 



Johnll.^Vntxm. 
F. 3, SlcKlniiny. 

do, 
A. C. Compbdl. 

y. S. McKlniiey. 
NortpulacBll'y. 

do. 

do. 

do. 

do. 
A, CiiDipbcll, 
F. E. Spcncor. 

dL>. 

do. 



Asset) er. 



C.E. Allen. 
J. M.^VillluiiiB. 
E. 1'. Bee J, 



do. 

do. 

Vim. B. Davli. 



A, M. Toil n go r. 
S. W. SmlU.. 
J. T. Calnhnlr, 



^ylUI>Dl Cii«llo. 



Clly Marshal. 



O. N.WbllmBn. 
Gear^. II ale. 



Clly Engineer. 



Council men I 



A. B. Hum 11 ton. 



do. 

iId. 
A. B. IIiDilllou. 
J. V. IIkUII. 

do. 

du. 



F. B. Clfmcnl, 
Jonepli A nil I, 
J. C. ilniursiiii, 

do. 
Joiepb Aram, 
IVm. IiiiiilPle, 
TboDiu Fallon, 

do. 

C. W I'oniuroy, 

do. 
;j. It. Luno, 
I ilo. 

E.J. Wilms, 
]C. W. roincniy, 
, do. 

' do, 

I do. 

China Soiltb, 
do. 

D. 0. Ve*lal, 
A.F. lIuKc, 

do. 
D.CVtilal, 

do. 
W. O. lUtker, 



Bttilninin Cory, 
J. B. Buruu, 
P. 0. Jllnor, 
Wm.M. Slaflbrd, 

do. 
A. a. Dealty. 
0. W.PomnroJ, 
Wm. DoHlelt, 
A. Plltlcr, 

do. 
J. B.Wilwn, 
W. W. McCoy, 
W. O'Donnpll, 
Jci«o Ifolson, 

do. 



Jiniel D. Carl, 
BenlBmln Cory, 

do. 

do. 
F, Llgbtilon, 
B. U.Ciitlur, 

do. 
J. 0. Cobb. 
J. P, Mnrlin, 
J. M. Williams, 
Artbur Sbfarcr 
O.T. Bjlnnd, 
O.D. Cbuncy, 
John Bonner, 

do. 

do. 



du. 
mKlne, J.A-Clojton, 



John H.GnrriHD, 
n. 0. aleluno, 
J. II. WoUon, 
J. ll.Uurpby, 

do, 

do. 
Jno. B. Price, 
MDic-aWllllanu. 
T^. B. KdiTArds. 
Jnmc* Marrlfod, 
Adam II olio way, 

do. 

do. 
O.YatfB, 
J. H. Corj-, 



PelorSbortBck, 
-Tolioh Bel den, 
Levi Ooodrlcb, 

do. 
Oliorlo lloody, 
P. O. Minor, 
Luri Goodricb, 



Ahr 

Jolin Balbnch, 



C.S.CfidcnwlM, 



J. It. Hall. 
D. CBulloy, 

do. 
FniDk LciriB, 

do. 

do. 

do. 
J, Swelgurl, 



J. J. Denny, 
Sobcrl rogv, 

do. 
JobnMcCunc, 

do. 
Frank Lswil, 
M. Hale, 



R. G. Sloody. 
S. D. Gttvilt. 
J. M. Wmiaini. 
Thoninj Bodley. 
I>. J. Porter, 

do. 

do. 

do. 

do. 

do. 

do. 

do. 
J. J. Dsnny, 
J. Jr Conmj, 

do. 
A. Luke, 
D. licllyer, 
Geo. B. UcKco, 



Julian Hnntu, Wlilbini Foaler. 

J. D. Iloppe. J- M- Jl'irpby. 

SI. W. rncliiini. J. SI. Wllliami. 
U. Ilrotcuibicld. Wllllitii Unoialo. 

J. McGlil, S.O. IloiiEliiOD, 

0. Mortln, K. G. Moody. 

J. M. JIurpiiJ-, Given! George. 



L.UBgeabeiiDDr. 



do. 

do. 

do. 

J. A. Leighton. 



A. Orceoinger. 



W.F. EllH, J.Lensen. 

do. do, 

B.C. Total, D.nrilyer. 



Supl, Schocli, 



Eli Carwln. 

da. 
B.P. Iliomton. 

do. 
L. Haniliton. 

do. 

do. 



do. 

J.M. Lillleflcld. 
Cb erica 8 lien L 
W. C. II Bit. 
W. B. Hardy. 
E. A. Clark. 

do. 
J. O. ITnakins. 
L. F. Cbiiiman. 

do. 



■ Wlllbini BarlloK Buccecdpd Goddon u Clerk, and llis bilter via nrtorrrnnia succeeded by Joicpb Slmiuon llio 

SDiirtng Ibo yean t8&7-S Ibo cily enienimeot nni orEonlznl ni a Ikuinl of Tiuiltra, [bo PraidenL of tbo Board ncling 
Prior lo Uio organliilion of lbs clly under \l* charter from Ibu Stale, Ibo Pueblo nnd clly bed 
anor July, 1810, FInt Aloilde, uiid Jnmo Biok«, Ei'cond Alcalde. John Borton, 1817. First Aienlde. 
10 November, thou John C, Cunroy uiiili eipiraiion of year. Joif Fcmntdfj, 1S«, Swond Alcaide. John C. Conroy, Finl Alcnldo In 1850. 



+ E, P. Reed (ucceedtd StiniBon. In Febr 
Dni to Slayorand ComiTio 



.ry, a< Clerk. 

Council. In 1872 (.'ity Jlanhnl changed lo Chief of Police. 



nt of tbo Board acting sa Mayor « o.^cfB. In 1B50 Ibo epvemmenl wu relnrnr-l to Jlayar and Comii.oQ Council In 1S72 L ity Jiannni euanBeo lo "-y'" ■" 'riL?' 
Ih.> toilowlnK AloildM, rii.: Anlonia Msrln Hco, 1816, Jinl Alcalde. Doloras Pachoco, 1810, First Atolde, imd reJroCl.o.bo1la Second AImIJo. John "anoa, 
.. Cliarici While 1818. Fi rat Alcalde, and Jame. W. ^'feek., Second Alcalde. II. K. Dlwn.lck, im. First Alcalde; Richard II. Slay, Tint Alcalde trom Augmt 



A LIST OF THE OFFICERS OF THE SANTA CLARA CITY GOVERNMENT, SINCE THE YEAR 1851. 



YWR, 



1852 
18S3 
1851 
1855 
1850 
1857 
1858 
1859 
18C0 
18G1 
186-2 
1863 
1804 
ISGS 
18GG 
1867 
18G8 
18G9 
18T0 
1871 
1872 
1873 
1874 
1875 
1870 



TRUSTEES. 



P. Lnfrd, 
G. C. TerriU, 
S. S. Barr, 
A. D. Bight, 
S. R. JoliiiEon, 
T. Q. McLprnn, 
A. B. Caldwell, 



J. H. Johnson, 
M. S. Wilson, 
S. Vf. Brundngc, 
do. 

F. C. Friinck, 

do. 

do. 

do. 

do. 

do. 
R. B. Donovnti, 
J. Eberhardt, 

do. 
M. Corcomn, 
M. Mulnrin, 



S. S. JoTinson, 
G. W. Ottison, 
R. K. Hnm, 
A. T. LightnL-r, 
John West, 
J. H. Morgan, 
do. 



A. B. Cnldweil, 
F. 0. Ftnnck, 
M. S. "Wilson, 
51. W. "Whitler, 
A. Mnrshall, 

do. 

do. 
N. I'Qlnior, 
L. Rubinsoi), 
R. E. Hum, 

do. 
J. P. Finloy, 

do. 

do. 
F. B. EingsloD, 



A. D. Hight, 
C. Clayton, 
G. "W, OltiBon, 

CdswcU Diivis, 
C. Thorn, 
S. Henderson, 
do. 



E. E. Hum, 
S. G- Antes. 
J. H. Dibble, 

do. 

do. 

do. 

do. 

do. 
Corey Peeblea, 

do. 

do. 
J. H. Dibble, 
J. M. Pierce, 

do. 
J. P. Pierce, 



P. Cooper, 
G. W. Moody, 
A. Jncubson, 
"W. B. Stncklon, 
S. G. Antes, 
A. B. Cdldwell, 
T. G. McLernn, 



J. L. Guernsey, 
B. "W. Brundiige, 
■Willium Poggnle, 
Ii. Robinson, 
P. Gnrrigus, 

do. 
P. 0. Field. 

do, 
a. McPurland, 

db. 
W. Murphy, 

do. 

do. 

do. 

do. 



E. Moiitry. 
William Cmneron. 
H. H, Worburton. 
A. Miidnm. 
T. G. Mc^eruu. 
L. Gnrdner. 
do. 



H. TJIirbroock. 

A. B. Babcock. 
Charles Otter. 

E. T. Starr. 

do. 

do. 

B. F. Hcoden. 
J. Eberhurdt. 

do. 

do. 
E. C. Bradbury. 

do. 

do. 
John Hetty. 

do. 



CLERK. 



0. W. Adams. 

H. D. MoCobb. 
U, W. Herrington. 
C. T. Healey. 
du. 



John. Erkaon. 
S. B. Stjuirea. 
J. M. Billings. 

do. 

do. 

do. 

J. S. Dilley. 

do. 
J. H. Morgan. 

do. 
0. "W. Upton. 
D. M. Pyle. 
G. O. Green. 



TREASURER. 



George Vincent. 
I. Chandler. 
1. B. Heuley. 
P. T. Grant. 
J. R. Johnson. 
8. J. Brother, 



A. Kadam. 

do. 
John ErkaoD. 
John Widney. 

do. 
do. 

do. 

J. M. Swinford. 

do. 

do. 

do. 

do. 

do. 
J. A. Vance. 



ASSESSOR. 



A. Madnm. 

A, M. Thompson. 

H. D. McCobh. 

P. J. Davis. 

P. G. Ricke. 

D. E. Lord. 

J. W. Bassford. 



J. F. Gosby. 

P. A. Brimblccorab. 
J. Vallier. 

do. 
E. Ayleaworlb. 
S. Morriaon. 
0. E. Squires. 

do. 
J. H. Morgan. 

do. 



MARSHAL. 



William Posgate. 

do- 
Williitm LitchBold. 
J. B. Konnuy. 
H. Brother. 

do. 
L. W. Hoover. 



Frederick Morris. 
John MulhoUand. 
M. Morrill. 
J. Vallier. 

do. 

do. 

do. 

do. 
W. B. Black. 

do. 
J. E. Hoigbt. 
J. A. Sboomakor. 
J. E. Haigbt. 
William Fitts. 



16i 



TOWN AND CITY GOVERNMENI^F^ILRO^SINCE THE YEAR 1868. 



mm 

1871 
1872 , 

1878 
187J I 
1675 I 
1876 



MAYOR. 



J. M. Browne. 
T. Howard, 
do. 

do. 
W. N. Furlong. 

do. 
Wm. Banna. 



TRUSTEES. 



TREASURER. 



ASSESSOR. 



CIcrii cr Recorder. 



J. C. Looser, Wm. Hunnn, Frank Oldham, J. Einstein, 

Wm. G. Mills, Wm. Hollowaj, C- K. Farlev, 

Wm. Hanoa, J. B. Jloroy, C. Finley, 

J. H. Corej, B. B. Uilclieock, Jo. 

do. do. Thos. Ren, 

do. do. do. 

Adam Biehl, H. C. Morey, do. 

do. do. do. 

do. L.A.Whitchurtt, J. Bciihcr, 



Wm. Isaac, 

do. 
A. Hay, 

do. 



J. neither, 
do. 

do. 

do. 

M. Koon, 

do. 



J. H. Gardiner. A. G- Cole, 

do. do. 

A. Robinson, E. Eminy, 



V. Howard. 

W- N. Steuben. 
do. 

do. 

do. 
do. 
John Pitine, 



H.Wiingoiiheim 
M. Einstein. 

do. 
J. M. Einfftlt. 

do. 

do. 

do. 

do. 
S. Barkloy. 



Jiiines Angol. 
Franuis Hooy. 



A. Wnrlhnn. 

do. 
G. T. Clark. 

do. 
L. V. ParaonB. 

do. 
F. G. Dyer. 

do. 
T.D.Sattorwhilo 



MARSHAL. 

A W. Hubbard. 
Mike Gruy. 

do. 
G. S. Hodon. 

do. 

do. 
J. C. Wood. 

do. 
A. G. Hinman. 



CITY AnoRNEt. 



J, L. Hatch. 
Hatch & SiiUey 



.i.Mn. V..(,rnnrT IS ll^i!8 'nioi'fllCHn dbovp Kivfi. HiTE fllKifd Wnreli 1. Hfi: nnrt Woj 4, or ttio N>iiir jenr. nnolhrr rl«lli.n wn. Ii 



* Tbo imn of Glltur hu Incorpunl"! W ""> Boaitl at SajKi 

FtcEpilnr Junea AiikiI. wbomi i»nl»c«J lij l(. D.Cood, nnil A. ... .. . — --, -^ -,- ;.—w . ~ . .<- - ■> >i ■ j i; i 

lrfu«S,b.r22.|ge9.;p*UldMliun: John a.r,n»»ll.M.J 7^ rjerc». »!«.«! 1.1 fill "=nd,-vr,« UK, r^tl.-r.n.l« , Tn,,i..« ,.f(,r lKf,-> 

: fillinr w« limrpiimWjH « dij by «*dJ «t ol ili» L^bI'I-I"". niil>n>"tl il"«h H. 1 W". It. ll.v al.otr. i«Mo Ci.HHcMii.ct. luko lli.> place, of Tnnr.'M «(t. r IBG.', 



I liulii, nnil llic tnniuiinf* diwrn lo (III ihp omrra of wliJdi llicy nrre fncmnlienli 
i; nlnj, C. JohnxiD nee McGrntily, rrmoird. ' 



POPULATION OF CALIFORNIA BY COUNTIES AT EACH CENSUS. 



Tbe Stato 



1 

2 

3 

i 

6 

6 

7 

8 



10 

11 

12 

18 

U 

IG 

le 

17 
18 
10 
20 
21 
22 
23 
24 
26 
2d 
27 
28 
20 
30 
81 
32 
S3 
84 
86 
3G 
87 



Alameda 

Alpino(rf) 

Amador {ti) 

Bullo 

Calavcraa (rfj 

Colusa 

Contra Costa , 

Del Norte 

El Dorodo Id) 

Fresno , 

Humboldt 

Inyo 

Kern [g) 

Klamath 

Lake {/i) 

LuEsen (i) 

Los Angeles 

Marin 

Mariposa 

Mendocino (ft) 

Merced 

Mono Id) (I) 

Monterey 

Napa (A) 

Nevada 

Placer ,.. 

Plumna (p) (i) 

Sacromento 

Snn Bernardino 

San Diego 

San Francisco (o) 

Sun Joaquin {p) '. 

San Luis Obispo 

Snn Mateo (o) 

Santa Barbara 

Santa Clara 

Santa Cruz 

Shasta (i) 

Sierra 

Siskiyou 

Solnno 

Sonoma 

Stanislaus (jj) 

Suitor (g) 

Tebama 

Trinity 

Tulare... 

Tuolumne Ip) 

Yolo(y) 

Tuba 



AHottaxiE. 



1870. 



660,247 



24,287 
OSG 

0,GB2 
n,403 
8,806 
6,1GS 
8,461 
2,022 

10,309 
6,836 
6,140 
1,D56 
2,026 
1,(180 
2,069 
1,827 

16,800 
6,n08 
4,6T2 
7,646 
2,807 
480 
9,876 
7,108 

10,184 

11,357 
4.480 

soisso 

3,98S 

4,951 

149,478 

21,050 
4,772 
G,G35 
7,784 

26,246 
8,743 
4,178 
6,G19 
6,843 

16,871 

10,810 
8,400 
6,030 
3,587 
3,213 
. 4,633 
8,160 
9,899 

10,861 



1860. 



879,904 



8,927 



10,980 
12,106 
16,290 
2,274 
5,828 
1,993 
20,662 
4,606 
2,604 



1,803 



1850. 



92,697 



8,674 

16,884 

116 



20,067' 



11,333 

8,334 
6,243 
3,967 
1,141 



4,789 

5,521 

16,446 

13,270 

4,863 

24,142 
6,651 
4,824 

66,802 
9,486 
1,782 
3,214 
8,543 

11,012 
4,044 
4,860 

11,387 
7,629 
7,160 

11,867 
2,246 
3,800 
4,044 
5,126 
4,088 

16,229 
4,716 

13,668 



3,630 

328 

4,370 

56 



1870. 



400,424 



1,872 
405 



0,087 



708 

(*) 
8,647 
830 



1,186 

(«) 
643 
378 



680 

560 



3,444 

' 1,636" 



8,361 
1,086 
9,673 



22,106 

676 
7,883 
0,197 
7,405 
5,880 
8,271 
1,009 
8,560 
3,260 
6,025 
1,608 
2,193 
1,081 
2,825 
1,809 
14,720 
6,304 
8,364 
6,866 
2,548 
386 
0,429 
6,726 
16,384 
8,860 
3,571 
22,725 
3,964 
4,888 
136,050 
19,193 
4,667 
6,008 
7,484 
24,536 
8,533 
3,529 
4,781 
5,820 
15,870 
19,184 
6,189 
4,791 
3,160 
1,051 
4,391 
6,556 
0,318 
8,302 



1360. 



823,177 



8,648 



1890. 



91,636 



8,262 
9,737 

12,546 
2,166 
6,185 
1,341 

15,515 

000 

2,498 



1,220 



0,221 
3,007 
4,808 
2,906 
1,114 



4,300 
5,448 

14,188 

10,810 
3,861 

21,692 
2,504 
1,240 

52,866 
0,166 
1,621 
8,088 
3,178 

11,646 
4,638 
8,896 
9,122 
6,992 
7,002 

11,587 
2,002 
8,348 
3,242 
3,370 
3,252 
14,096 
4,683 
11,682 



3,541 

10,802 

115 



1870. 



4,272 



10,908 



8,518 

821 

4,184 

55 



1,854 
405 



31 
1 
72 
84 
31 
81 
21 
12 
182 
16 



I860. 



4,086 



65 



71 

95 

25 

27 

48 

277 

8 

Q 



184 
22 

90 



30 



8,875 



790 



8,616 

836 



1,181 



643 
878 



643 
560 



3,424 



1,617 



8,288 
1,076 
9,607 



16 

109 

165 

95 

2 

475 

8 

15 

1,830 

223 

9 

10 

38 

173 

5S 

44 

28 

29 

78 

77 

4 

31 

78 

28 

39 

67 

60 

152 



87 
23 
90 
8 
23 



17 

55 

166 

52 

5 

468 

19 

8 

1,176 

126 

12 

68 



1850. 



962 



1870. 



82 



1J9 



12 
2 

195 



18 



(a) Including 33 JupanHio. 

(dl In lera AlpJnp from Ainndor, Calaytmi, Kl BoituId, nnd Slono. 

(t) Tliorolurnnof lSMrurConiniCoal.iond8jiiitiiCIuraivcrolo!lDiHUpmiy lollioCcninijOmce and tliM,. f„r >i,n Vmn 
cl™ «B.c_<l^.lroi;td by lire. Tli., corroctod Bulo c.'n.,u> of 1S62 pirc, Iho popHlS^Uon of iarj.ri" wunU."i 



87 

82 
42 

57 
71 
42 
85 
45 
30 
42 
17 
S3 

166 
27 

233 



212 




20 



18 



63 
10 
66 



1,IJ27 
2,082 
1,441 
271 
160 
217 
/i,582 
427 
39 
29 
143 
542 
110 
17 
j236 
3G1 
1,084 
129 
180 
42 
280 
263 
2,627 
2,410 
911 
ni3,Q96 
10 
70 
n12,030 
1,020 
60 
610 
109 
1,625 
156 
574 
810 
1,440 
020 
473 
306 
203 
204 
1,090 
90 
1,524 
895 
2,337 



ISGO. 



34,988 



198 



2,568 

2,177 

8,657 

9 

2 

338 

4,702 

300 

87 



633 



11 

4 

1,843 

6 



6 
17 

2,147 

2,392 

309 

1,731 



1870. 



7,241 



111 



40 

18 
424 


784 

6 

2,S85 

76 
811 
586 

61 

28 

1 

219 

126 

34 
542 

87 

2 

201 

06 



1860. 



17,708 



181 



22 

121 

1 

76 

114 

266 

8 

3,204 

153 



2,710 
139 



22 
6 

416 

2,208 

616 

■ 14 

51 

192 

2 

104 

1,638 

13 

1,962 

a 

1,781 



28 

64 

5 

187 

S 

158 

12 

2 

26 



46 



2,014 

210 

7 

1,054 

4 



60 
3 

85 



54 

140 

4 

3 
117 



411 

1 

5 

7 

108 

251 

3,028 

8,067 

41 

4 

140 

52 

366 

157 

213 



51 

21 

144 



10 

656 

100 

1,340 

6 



72 



1 
2 
8 
4 
6 
6 
7 
8 
9 
10 
11 
12 
13 
14 
15 
16 
17 
18 
19 
20 
21 
22 
23 
24 
25 
26 
27 
28 
20 
30 
31 
32 
33 
34 
86 
36 
)37 
;38 
39 
I 40 
I 41 
42 
'43 
44 
I 46 
i« 
,47 
48 
40 
!50 



CcHUi, 27SS; S^n Frni 
(1 



fultuHBjtjontra 



mim^^BSB-smis^Bsp-^^'^^^ 



(f) IiiolndJnBasJiipaniau. 
(ij) In IBM orgnnizcd. 



In 1B63 Lake from Nnpn. 

In lena L-ijicii from riamiu ani] Sboatn. 

Inclnding 2 Jopiocjo. 

In ItiMlgisnnltiKl. 

Ill ISKiorgniiiud. 

IncluilinE 1 Japwcu. 

Including SJnpiiDcf^. 

la IS^T ^in Zllattro from San FmacJsco. 

In 1&A4 SLanialatu trvta San Juaqula fuid TnolninnD 



CALIFORNIA MANUFACTURES, BY TOTALS OF COUNTIES, Etc., 1870. 



Alameda 

Alpine 

Amador 

Butte 

Calaveras 

Colusa 

Contra Cosln 

Del Norte 

El Borado 

Fresno 

Humboldt 

Invo 

Kern 

Klamath 

Lake 

Lassen 

Los Angeles 

Marin 

Mariposa 

Menaocino 

Merced 

Mono 

Monterey 

Napa 

Nevada 



120 
10 
80 
45 

240 

32 

86 

29 

02 

7 

85 

27 

11 

8 

22 

10 

70 

25 

13 

85 

5 

8 

35 

4 

187 



6 

1 

10 

18 



1 

3 

10 

6 

26 



648 


630 


20 


19 


384 


884 


286 


335 


669 


568 


78 


78 



63 

66 

250 

118 

316 

10-1 

71 

137 

163 

16 

621 

396 

110 

876 

13 

20 

03 

16 

697 



65 

257 

112 

303 

104 

71 

187 

163 

16 

621 

306 

110 

875 

18 

28 

03 

16 

506 



465,750 

20,076 

086,250 

442,200 

284,920 

63,860 

86,640 

77,430 

248,422 

272,800 

405,400 

231,120 

123,700 

90,600 

301,725 

18,160 

648,670 

235,000 

203,050 

1,114,550 

43,300 

27,000 

133,100 

25,700 

501,260 



it 



287,880 
6,135 

173,016 

144,7^0 

130,598 
44,317 
31,776 
16,803 
86,009 
70,000 

1-58,887 
61,180 
22,985 
56,006 
67,510 
1,005 

154,100 
88,250 
70,074 

858.760 
3,500 
12.180 
30,M05 
3,7'10 

247,704 



544,602 

6,625 

007,894 

650,175 

104,224 

147,753 

40,694 

65,290 

264,064 

412,025 

-325,259 

213,795 

68,048 

96,832 

145,416 

11.200 

204,063 

148,336 

86,702 

412,768 

53,880 

40,345 

109,306 

128,561 

671,101 



1,108,914 
22,762 

1,588,404 

977,037 

606,150 

262,743 

107,835 

208,415 

462,876 

520,200 

805,272 

347,488 

104,894 

251,410 

260,200 

22,400 

725,036 

322,806 

264,226 

1,006.464 

06,487 

74,626 

107,605 

180.510 

1,208,800 



Placer 

Plumas 

Sacramento 

San Itcrnundino. 

San Diego 

Snn Francisco 

San Joai|uin , 

San Luis Obispo. 

San Mnico , 

Sanlft Barbarn. . 

Santa Clara 

Santa Cruz 

Shii3ta 

Sierra 

Siskiyou 

Solano 

Sonoma 

Stanislaus 

Sutter (n) 

Tehama 

Trinity 

Tularo 

Tuolumne ......... 

Yolo 

Tuba 



28 

182 

20 

5 

1,223 

140 

10 

76 

24 

171 

76 

40 

42 

47 

101 

234 

18 

...... 

22 
14 

25 
103 

114 



10 
G 

28 

i 

2 

207 

10 
3 

11 



28 
24 
2 
9 
6 
6 
33 
1 



844 

112 

1,159 

104 

23 

12,377 

465 

34 
283 
105 
761 
704 
110 
200 
103 
303 
054 

40 






6 


141 


11 


60 


t! 


60 


12 


105 


1 


806 





612 



344 

112 

1,001 

103 

21 

11,252 

453 

84 
281 

94 
741 
704 
110 
200 
108 
200 
044 

40 

89 

50 

60 

105 

800 

507 



66 



Is 



38B 



52 



271,625 

148,700 

1,761,179 

75,275 

22,200 

21,170,956 

421,026 

36,900 

230,270 

170,000 

3,828,900 

1,202,550 

100,776 

364,090 

169,100 

434.200 

726,080 

212,350 

"l40J6oo' 

48,450 

68,100 

148,600 

265,52.} 

761,600 



191,270 

60,450 
1,107,428 

32,300 

7,667 

7.238,528 

238,476 

13,480 
105,225 

26.450 
360,626 
330,607 

37,016 

90,755 

82,269 
144,780 
328,884 

20,700 

62,'766" 
16,520 
10,150 
44,480 
100,857 
267,208 



I? 



(a) HMurncJ lu bsTlaB nu niBnufaclnr 



232,743 
238,041 

1,964 847 

68.593 

29,768 

20,046,321 

407,009 

47,633 

182,116 

27,948 

1,506,725 

810,440 

77,669 

367,099 

103,071 

416,983 

740,470 

147,274 

'VlV5i244" 

20,300 

65,445 

130,697 

285,602 

707,814 I 



61O.G06 

340,861 

3,964,616 

174,350 

67,807 

37,410,829 

1,074.89" 

97,890 

346,268 

GO.OOT 

2,332,800 

1,646,140 

192,518 

574.875 

237,665 

811,297 

1,478,813 

218.234 

""817,004" 

64,282 

125 200 

267.085 

686,128 

1,337,831 



n 



CALIFORNIA SELECTED STATISTICS OF AGRICULTURE, 1870. 



1 

2 

8 

i 

6 



? 

8 

i) 
10 
11 
1*2 

M 

ir. 

Hi 
17 
18 
1!) 
20 
:!l 

:Ja 
23 
21 
25 
20 
27 
2B 
29 
80 
31 
32 

as 

3'1 

«5 
BU 
37 
38 

an 

40 
41 
•12 

-IS 
44 
45 
4Q 
47 
-J8 
40 
GO 



dSE 



1 -e E o 



■4rres. DoUam. 

Alnmndn 178,fIGl 1«,747,770 

Alpine 12,3«G 82,800 

Amador 41.534 48il,400( 

Uutio 187,1185 2,423,30111 

Ciihivcm -JLOOO 221,2451 

CVIu-.li 223,337 4,408,004 

C.mini Coelii 2711.100 J,t)3r!,G35 

Dnl NiTtC n.877 lG5,0o0 

El Diinido 73,823 072,285 

Frpsno 24.530 020,705 

HiirnbolJl 811,851 1,244,776 

Inyrj 4,'J88 148,520 

Ki-rn n,0(i(J 8311.050 

Klimmlli 8£00 011,850 

Liikc 17I50B 713,100 

l,i,s»en 87,363 207,800 

J,<« Ani-dca 234,883 4,240,885 

SlHrin..:. 247,180 0,532,313 

Miiripu-a 24,184 840,500 

MeriUnL-in., 02,043 ],3C4,ti43 

Jlurccd 47-1.755 2,324,112 

Slono 0,100 84.300 

M.mtortiy 150,2U1 5,150,208 

Niiri" 38,539 1,1»1»B,100 

N,wii(lii 7,074 508,750 

piiiiier 71,0-57 904.200 

IMiiniiiB fill,131 441,510 

SiicrJimcnto 818,(i5« 5.052,lfiO 

Sun Bornurdino 7,120 191,242 

Sun Uicjo 10,968 782,1102 

Siin FnineisfO 3,792 5,817.400 

SnnJniiquhi 428,001 7.874,305 

SanLuUObi-po 457,840 1.800,073 

Hiin Miileo 44,020 3,307.701 

Siinw Uiirbaru 40.02(1 5.323,903 

.Smiln Uhini 108,315 12,022,722 

Sant» Uru7, 38,852 1,870.8001 

Shiisti. 22,332 324,970 

biorrii 13,204 170,1)50 

Siskiyou 00,074 724,7o6 

S„liinr. 3G0.53G 10,17O,7-i8 

Siinoma 402,020 10,070,183 

SlanislHUS 380.230 4,302.840 

Sutler 107,900 2,072,288 

IVIianin 185,300 1,353.815 

Trinilv 2,307 78,550 

Tulnro Su.fSa 812,000 

Tm.lumnc 18,730 206,305 

y„lo 807,150 8,720.680 

Yuba '0.231 1,350,827 



Dot lam. 
2,310,002 
105,400 
303,983 
1,445.591 
889.388 
2,011,830 
1,421,895 
60.017 
498.148 
2:!9,0G8 
057,212 
157,221 
192,025 
117,949 
310,928 
295,386 
930,859 
1 02.5,171 
095.830 
616,378 
754.760 
88.822 
1,040.107 
500.816 
371.005 
1,203,275 
380,051 
2,074.109 
138,140 
100,920 
840,754 
4,376,075 
707.715 
1,100,793 
8J7,002 
2,700,125 
381,105 
290,028 
189,230 
507,573 
3,170,-535 
2,509,718 
2,718,030 
018,417 
880,234 
88,325 
818,910 
208,250 
3,022.355 
006,224 



DoUnm. 
1,119,435 

204,700 
280,687 
851,850 
401.090 
1,872,859 
053.340 
65,8SS 
449,439 
080,010 
727.060 
228,308 
419.125 
78,755 
814,210 
354,241 
1,177,805 
1,308,556 
239,671 
070,257 
1,428,870 
107,150 
2,030,0.52 
350,160 
181,270 
341.770 
542,849 
1,604,770 
151,530 
545,277 
280,355 
1,092.119 
1,5-50,818 
745,543 
947,840 
1,487.070 
3I1),375 
206,119 
110,285 
880,365 
1,532,095 
2,178,990 
1,382,043 
611,798 
008,047 
04,478 
1,164,817 
284,195 
1,283,404 
573,927 



No. 
6,947 
600 
1,680 
4,315 
1,781 
5,906 
7,033 
394 
2,098 
3,074 
4,320 
1,614 
1,085 
284 
1,984 
2,022 
9,052 
2,071 
1,110 
4,405 
2,302 
723 
8,017 
1,756 
780 
1,707 
1,440 
0,462 
970 
5,887 
Oil 
14,139 
4,485 
3,238 
8,777 
7,020 
1,720 
1,473 
404 
4,054 
0.852 
10.010 
10,13 
4,754 
3,000 
185 
4,590 
1,283 
8,789 
8,104 



Ko. 
047 
15 
141 
272 
76 
07O 
658 
37 
120 
203 
460 
98 
103 
308 
1 
01 
635 
115 
112 
488 
661 
82 
403 
311 
21 
107 
180 
628 
100 
723 
1 
770 
400 
359 
339 
270 
101 
157 
04 
'402 
1,040 
1,110 
1,130 
834 
207 
23 
270 
203 
1,200 
283 



No. 
3,003 
808 
1,471 
2 830 
1,995 
2,000 
6,860 
707 
8.809 
1,009 
6,601 
783 
628 
372 
1.827 
- 1,791 
2,468 
18,655 
923 
3,431 
872 
545 
0,370 
1,126 
1,148 
1,503 
8,465 
9,050 
022 
1,268 
8,160 
6,990 
4,818 
6,140 
2,160 
7,558 
2,168 
1,207 
887 
2,031 
4,123 
14,900 
2,271 
3,623 
2,157 
425 
2,0-89 
1,681 
8,088 
2,909 



No. 
36 
8 
68 
50 
61 
14 
23 
88 
188 
437 
282 
110 
118 
38 
72 
48 
48 
244 
117 
143 
110 
101 
189 
07 
24 
69 
220 
105 
10 
880 
1 
50 
01 
200 
88 
18 
603 
79 
43 
114 
43 
302 
17 
100 
11 
80 
54 
48 
63 
53 



No. 

40,602 

67,165 

23,914 

70,804 

35,214 

175,903i 

20,650 

067 

17,367 

139,077 

12.000 

521 

90,200 

17 

10,807 

703 

247,003 

2,007 

18,442 

40,839 

40,625 

101 

298,877 

6.000 

604 

26,596 

12,042 

113,304 

18,121 

16,443 

1 

70.880 

101,900 

0.535 

189,858 

40,085 

819 

3,520 

402 

12,844 

41.800 

58.387 

118.400 

36,078 

130,863 

180 

147,301 

30,117 

83,087 

12,640 



nuDuciP. 



No. 

4,042 

215 

6,380 

19,242 
8,173 

33,640 
7,079 
1,359 
4,123 

16,010 

10,050 

088 

753 

1,057 

11,547 
1,057 
5,702 
6,600 
8,577 

18,100 

0,054 

659 

13,052 

6,243 

1,187 

7,421 

1,842 

14,749 

1,006 

1,683 

426 

27,937 

3,310 

6,820 

3,947 

8,135 

8.408 

11,155 

487 

7,499 

17,138 

28,588 

14,593 

10,090 

19,450 

371 

15,403 

4 200 

26,856 

13,047 



BunlmU. 

854,888 

1,204 

10,078 

746,102 

8,341 
701,174 
025,054 

7,433 

3,007 
19,705 
32,284 
13,629 
13,700 

2,300 
87,010 
12,904 
12,210^ 
67,880 

4 275 

06,630 

218,102 

0,144 

744,003 

204,240 

585 

102,402 

10,212 
120,135 

10,356 

32,947 



BusheU. 
27,288 

808 
30,700 

10,400 
4, .535 

2,380 

280 

505 

081 

3,930 

10.0:^2 

22,015 

3,676 

1,505 

11,615 

205 

454.896 

820 

455 

0,878 

14,450 

025 

3,570 

10,190 

300 

1,000 

190 

62,280 

12,250 

0,880 



liiuhtU. 

03,080 

3,113 

130 

6,140 



280 
07,025 
14,955 

268 



137,022 

2,175 

000 

2,376 

3,894 

80.407 

253 

207,744 

350 

129,971 

750 

4,178 

21,411 

3,7»0 

100 

2,510 

03,474 

10,910 

60 

200 



2,300.925 

88,804 

107,049 

20,200 

1,188,137 

115,087 

29,509 

7,704 

116,107 

1,049,418 

618,425 

1,050,725 

078,710 

404,722 

9,898 

63,005 

21,020 

2,026,612 

147,347 



37,350 

25,082 

278 

158,374 

18,034 

22,795 

2,455 



8,107 

8,7.:0 

145,702 

15,700 

20,613 

626 

705 

9,750 

187 

2,140 

33,245 



000 

780 

204,318 

514 

15,134 

50,000 

2,227 

8,250 

131,383 

5.442 

823,061 



4,150 
3,801 
1,400 



40 

1,320 

27,807 



666,075 

8,209 
01,816 

389.098 
37,395 
386,408 
858,860 
2,560 
8.042 
18,875 
31,907 
4,905 
20,270 
650 
67,946 
93,020 
103.080 
87,755 
8,185 
64,070 
142,430 
12,704 
081,110 
34,800 
200 
57,201 
10,345| 
580,013 j 
01,900 
18,746 
600 
1,027,016 
120,004 
171,207 
187,871 
405,575 
72,155 
51,0:i6 
10,415 
55,138 
443,400 
105,450 
082,9.50 
452,911 
108,323 
735 
85,110 
7.99E 
499,020 
270,271 



188,975> 

281.700] 

73,0101 

361,0231 

129,0351 

1,080,5001 

68,800 

8,471 

60,000 

101,094 

61,807 



Foiindn. \liu»htl» Builiein. 



281,100 

72 

68,046 

75 

902,003 

6,092 

87,810 

178,403 

231,072 

7,000 

1,054,310 

20,789 

""i69,6:j8 

13,023 

51-5,213 

71,070 

9,250 



80.700 
903,803 

12,025 

006,200 

179-405 

3,100 

15.820 



43,858 
300,817 
230,304 
749,263 
126,057 
446,450 



660,045 
48,525 

437,048 
63,425 



114,053 

6,006 
9,898 
2,043 
0,605 
1,708 
1.020 
20,405 
4,093 
4,208 
372,924 
6,336 
6,000 
9,648 
5,154 
0.17O 
20,407 
157,245 
1,712 
83,473 
13.830 
4,982 
09.850 
2,458 
5,548 
2,208 
14,848 
72,055 
1,-542 
8-672 
128,800 
7,095 
5,741 
829,876 
20,539 
31,704 
34,253 
9,748 
8,451 
17,066 
1,0.50 
360,154 
1,750 
1,612 
200 
5,058 
8,685 
5,200 
10,520 
9,250 




'D[sHiicUoiior"ii)rlnB"mid"wlnti't"nolniiidoIo Ilia relurna ufwlicatfroni Ciilifuruiii 



NATIVE AND FOREIGN POPULATION OF CALIFORNIA, 1870. 



Alpine 

Amador \ 

Buuo. 

CnI«vi;r«B 

Coliisu 

Uontm Uostu.,.. 

Di'l Norte 

El Durado 

Fresno 

Humboldt 

Inyo 

Kern 

KliimnlU 

Liikc 

Lassen 

Li)^ Angeles 

Alnrin 

Mariposii 

SlenQDiiino 

Merced 

Slonrito 

Munlerey 

Nupn 



S 



Alameda 14,382 

485 

5,449 

7,428 

4,077 

6,088 

5,791 

1,580 

0,287 

4,974 

4,046 

1,164 

2,157 

793 

2,483 

1,178' 

10,084 

3,701 

2,1112 

6,147 

2,100 

306 

7,070 

6,394 



Nevada m,^Vi 



7,332 

150 

2.601 

2,720 
2,099 
1,938 
3,140 
1.068 
2,909 
8,787 
1,974 
261 
083 
868 
1,060 
805 
6,021 
1,931 
1,155 
2,940 
894 
04 
4,519 
2,438 
5,070 



1,722 
67 
300 
697 
280 
201 
430 
00 
493 
71 
323 
122 
01 
78 
102 
81 
408 
883 
128 
305 
132 
20 
441 
401 
880 



230 

18 

378 

600 

139 

650 

310 

41 

231 

162 

182 

04 

106 

28 

365 

108 

412 

00 

77 

691 

2<14 



443 

446 
323 



008 

10 

130 

181 

177 

64 

209 

24 

177 

87 

120 

27 

20 

24 

18 

28 

102 

214 

71 

97 

41 

16 

154 

165 

838 



442 

38 

312 

582 

122 

229 

204 
61 

30 
58 

217 

04 

61 

33 

01 

97 

222 

101 

68 

202 

62 

20 

210 

229 

041 



TonccaN CO UN. 



771 
32 

143 

280 

176 
70 

142 
25 

173 
11 

354 

80 

26 

43 

21 

46 

141 

159 

03 

300 

54 

12 

134 

10;i 

577 



0,855 

200 

4,133 

3,975 

4,218 

1,07? 

2,070 

442 

4,022 

1,362 

1,194 

792 

708 

893 

480 

140 

4,325 

3,142 

2,380 

1,308 

Oil 

125 

2,206 

1,769 

, 8,065 



733 
30 

120 
151 

70 
100 
208 

U 
120 

23 
648 

71 

81 

33 

42 

15 

05 

183 

82 

319 

42 

16 

192 

114 

392 2,324 



605 

38 

400 

306 

280 

98 

649 

40 

407 

149 

180 

70 

84 

51 

00 

41 

248 

181 

210 

108 

40 

13 

230 

109 



2,657 

25 

490 

492 

466 

246 

728 

71 

418 

78 

883 

122 

90 

137 

171 

35 

471 

948 

222 

200 

119 

22 

411 

512 



1,E 



815 
18 
II 
98 
51 
33 

214 


128 
10 
61 
20 
18 
17 
18 

65 
04 
87 
05 
11 
4 

80 
56 
158 



I ^ 



1,232 

19 

820 

430 

4O0 

216 

802 

53 

684 

62 

138 

122 

71 

60 

15 

25 

635 

273 

148 

100 

60 

22 

ISO 

272 

682 



283 

7 

162 

129 

350 

20 

79 

7 

151 

83 

24 

40 

20 

6 

8 

8 

317 

134 

113 

9 

18 

I 

121 

48 

237 



43 

84 

10 

36 

43 

14 

12 

12 

68 

10 

41 

8 

9 

21 

6 

1 

58 

68 

14 

120 



3 

29 

49 

90 



tODSTlKS.; 



Placer 

Plumas 

Siicnimento 

San Dcrniirdino. 

San Diego 

San Frnncisco — 

San,Toaqiiin 

San Luis Obispo 
,$an Miiteo.-- 
Siinta liarbitra... 

Snnlii Clnra 

Siintn CruK -. 

Shu5ta 

Sierra 

Siskiyou 

SoloniL 

Sonumtt 

SliiniElaus.... 

Sutter 

Tchlima 

Trinity 

Tulare 

Tunlumiie..-. 

Yolo 

Tuba 



6,107 
2,414 

16,223 

3,328 

3,743 

75,754 

14,821 

3,833 

3,497 

0,638 

17-241 

6,758 

2,037 

2,816 

4,321 

11,208 

15,050 

5,147 

3,949 

2,831 

1,897 

8,077 

4,182 

7,778 

0.144 



2,579 
887 
7,106 
1,001 
1,620 
38,191 
0,578 
2,320 
1,935 
4,362 
9,207 
3,019 
1,147 
1,305 
1,763 
4,632 
0,023 
1,884 
1,102 
1,009 
712 
1,727 
2,168 
2,809 
2,760 



6-51 
213 

1,815 

194 

290 

12,612 

1,149 
132 
881 
319 

1,423 
635 
107 
314 
312 

1,202 

1,050 
321 
254 
209 
130 
168 
205 
U02 
660 



223 
91 
549 

167 

in 

664 
941 
222 

08 
225 
876 
2:i2 
200 

66 
245 
797 
1,803 
605 
390 
278 

87 
455 

66 
896 
230 



s 


1 










s 


s 


X 


330 


246 


50 


160 


608 


853 


16 


03 


108 


127 


7,147 


1,116 


696 


580 


42 


129 


185 


92 


90 


187 


514 


651 


221 


223 


50 


180 


84 


128 


69 


289 


660 


561 


842 


023 


107 


212 


44 


292 


43 


130 


32 


01 


IF 


KIP 


214 


82 


137 


477 


159 


300 



341 
111 

487 
23 
99 



iimiaK BO as. 



5,190 
2,075 I 
10,602 
H60 
1,208 



,650 73,719 

446{ 6.220 

21 939 



180 

112 

380 

828 

40 

172 

112 

890 

424 

154 

70 

25 

00 

28 

219 

128 

279 



3,188 
1,240 
9,005 
1,985 
1,230 
2,803 
2,027 
5,608 
4,103 
1,303 
1,081 

768 
1,610 

060 
8,968 
2,121 
4,707 



201 

122 

5-12 

82 

123 

,367 

805 

50 

192 

60 

090 

187 

38 

221 

02 

488 

665 

94 

01 

41 

45 

39 

82 

IBS 

107 



640 

248 

905 

170 

98 

,419 

635 

76 

197 

134 

790 

190 

85 

494 

128 

471 

383 

119 

HI 

51 

03 

50 

886 

224 

283 



810 

237 

2,429 

78 

172 

25,804 

1,581 

101 

981 

189 

2,360 

590 

107 

406 

210 

2,443 

1,281 

317 

270 

126 

201 

71 

559 

489 

027 



104 
40 

187 

34 

80 

1.087 

123 
34 
06 
34 

158 
66 
29 
00 
85 

170 

137 
35 
60 
19 
20 
16 
80 
62 
73 



671 

169 

1,634 

85 

140 

13,002 

1,084 

94 
258 
118 
1,007 
285 
209 
344 
211 
043 
042 
179 
240 
135 
171 

78 
889 
488 
484 



73 
99 

170 

18 

20 

3,548 

189 
33 
87 
92 

481 
49 
61 

100 
87 
82 
84 
41 
34 
11 
37 
5 

111 
30 

102] 



70 
65 
109 

3 

II 

1,170 

56 

5 
60 
13 
90 
86 
11 
32 
24 
53 
92 
71 
33 
10 
20 

6 
40 
38 
23 



• Also Gnat I)ritnli.,ai.HlnHjd; AmndDr.M; ElDotado.B; Socraincnlo, 2; Sun Fmni:I.co, 2S; Sin Ju>iiuin,2i S.nla Clara, 1. 



18 



POPULATION OF CALIFORNIA, MINOR CIVIL DIVISIONS, Etc., 1870. 



Note.— The marginal CDlumn morks towntliips or supervisor's district, prcciTicLs, find IninVsurvey Io«-ns!iip= ; tlio first itiilciitatmn, cilies ; Iho secoiul, lownB- Niimcs of lowiis nro placed under tbo namEB of [ho lowriflliipa 
or sijpcrvisiir's districla, precincU, iind Inml-survoy lownsliijw in wbicb [hey iire riMpeclivcly situatud. Tlio popiilution of cuch township or siipervisur's (listricl, precinct, iind lund-i:nrvoy towiisliip, inoludus thnt of nil i„»„^ 
ailuntcd in il. 



t 



ALAMEDA, (n) 

Alameda ! l,rj&7 

Brooklyn , 2,8IG 

Brooklyn l.CO.'i 

Eden B.SAl 

Huywiird { C04 

Sun Lciiridru I 426 

Murray i 2, •100 

Oiiklnnd 11,104 

Oiikliind lO/iOO 

Wiishingmn ' 3,010 

Alviinido [ 816 



BG9 
1,C38 
1,002 
1,778 
805 
264 
1,J67 
0,940 



AT.riNB. {h) 



AUAIIOft. (c) 

1. Jackeun 

2. lony 

8. V(>lciino 

4. Suittr 

5. Dryl'iivn 

G. Fiddlelown 



m'TTK. {(/) 

Bidwcll 

Concow 

Chico 

Hiimillon 

Kinisbew 

Mountain Spring.... 

Opiiir 

Oroville .... 

Oregon 

Oro 

Wyundoito 



CALAVKKAS. (f.) 



9. 
10. 



COLUSA. (/■) 

Butto 

Colusii 

Colusii 

Grnrd Ishind 

Monroe 

Princflon 

Storey Creek 

Spring Viilley 



CONTRA COSTA, (y) 



MiirtinoK 

San Piiblo 



BEL NOtlTE. (A) 

Crescenl 

Crcsocnl City.. 

Hap])y Ciimp 

Mountain 

Smilli'B River 

EI. DORADO, (t) 

Coloma 

CoEumnca 



44 

202 
114 

201 
130 
84 



2,408 
1,779 
1,367 
1,9(1(1 
803 
1,210 



337 

490 

3,714 

1,130 

867 

2n4 

2,480 

1,426 

1,109 

281 

731 



9G0 
1.800 
1,000 
1,178 
1,748 
1 ,129 

480 



liOi 

2,193 

1,061 

702 

1,130 

132 

08U 

8Q0 



2,001 
C(!0 
1,07.1 
1,850 
4,010 



977 

458 

382 

Oil 

604 



926 
642 



1,(J96 
177 



89 
60 
07 
180 
84 
23 



1,170 

1,094 

840 

1,167 

480 

702 



178 
103 

2,790 
5ii9 
472 
IGG 

1,558 



088 

1,178 
GOl 

1,508 
lOD 
172 
983 

4,164 



813 

216 
G04 



522 
730 
705 
094 
1,041 
GUI 
2B4 



600 
1,770 
760 
671 
02G 
87 
GS4 
G8T 



1,278 

431 

041 

1,408 

3,015 



832 
363 
178 
42 
528 



49(1 
372 



1,324 
138 



1,238 
085 
017 
809 
80 
517 



15!) 

827 
024 
601 
385 
98 
872 



1,407 

2,630 

i,rm 

3.138 

487 

412 

2,159 

10.142 



36G 

GO 

227 



438 

1,070 
836 
484 
707 
408 
210 



104 
423 
232 
131 
204 
46 
62 
1G3 



723 
120 
434 
352 
1,595 



145 

105 

204 

67 

30 



420 
170 



2,721 
259 



44 

102 
112 
207 
127 
34 



El. DOUADO. — Corii'J 

Diamond Spring. 

Georcelowii 

Greenwood 

Kelsey'g 

Lnko'Viilley 

Moiinluin 

Mtid Springs 

PInctrvillo 

Pliitervillu 

Salmon Fulls 

While Oiik 



Funerfo. (j) 



1,088 3 
],33U 24 
1,218 

30 
2 
6 



040 
840 



243 

266 
3,175 
G49 
COO 
109 
2,054 



1,122 
258 
587 



744 
1,289 
1,335 
1,084 
1,610 
1,040 

304 



5G5 
1,961 

806 
GIO 
979 
109 
638 
727 



1,96G 
642 
l.OGQ 
1,828 
4,477 



53G 
309 
118 
74 
281 



GG3 
407 



8. 



IIUHBOl.TJT. (i) 

Arm In 

Biickpporl 

Eel KivEr 

Eurckrt 

Miittoje 

Pacilii' 

South Fork 

Tabic Bill 11". 



INYO. (I) 

Bisliop Creek 

Cerro Gordo 

Independeneo...., 
LoDO Pine 



KEUN. (hi) 



KLAMATH, (h) 

Dillon 

HoiipiL Valley In- 

diiin lic^crvHlion 

Klnmalb 

Cnn)p Giiston. 
Liberty 

Siiivyer'a Bur, 

Orleans , 

Siilnion 

Smith Fork 

Triiiidad 

Trinidiid 



LAKE, (o} 

1st Siyiervifor's disl'ct 
Knoxvillo itlincf.. 
Lower Luke 

2d SuptTFisor's district 
Luki'port 

SdSuporviaor'sdUtrict 

LASSEN. (/?) 

Janc3villc 

Long Valley 

Milibrd 

Suianville 

L03 ANOBLKa. {7) 

Bl MonlG 

Aaisa 

Los Angeles 

Los Angeles 

Loa Nicioi 

Sun Gubriel 

Hiinta Afia 

Anaheim 



1,055 

1,023 

577 

316 

246 

2711 

1,672 

2,024 

1,662 

428 

751 



2.83G 
1,700 
1,740 



924 
888 
827 
2,040 
403 
818 
273 
408 



C24 
474 

4011 
468 



029 
510 

lao 

010 
820 
230 



70 

12 
278 
118 
348 
100 
173 
136 
280 
374 
160 



1,15G 
104 
G92 
880 
248 
933 



441 
135 
113 
638 



1,254 

320 

2.776 

6,728 

1,-544 

4311 

1,446 

881 



G35 
GOO 
297 
218 
198 
136 
953 
1,070 
091 
184 
46G 



2.001 

1,318 
I,G05 



093 
207 
725 
1,282 
404 
097 
251 
327 



480 
162 
2G3 
260 



477 
460 
82 
49G 
477 
1G5 



45 

10 

ino 
00 

106 
81 

109 
81 
70 

257 

109 



886 
37 
530 
821 
225 
777 



401 
112 
104 

501 



1,064 

248 

1,997 

8.724 

1,274 

332. 

1,025| 

680I 



420 
364 
260 
97 
48 
136 
GUI 
954 
571 
244 
290 



835 
442 

85 



231 
121 
102 
70 
40 
121 
22 
81 



144 

322 
137 
180 



102 

00 

38 

120 

348 

63 



84 



118 

58 

242 

70 

04 

105 

211 

117 

61 



271 
127 
102 
60 
23 
106 



882 

856 

460 

206 

244 

212 

1,244 

2,296 

1,318 

290 

071 



1,879 
633 
847 



910 
384 
825 
1,900 
443 
810 
202 
397 



12 



190 
72 
770 
2,004 
270 
104 
420 
201 



GIG 
295 
378 
319 



308 
474 
85 
372 
728 
136 



41 

12 
22G 
IIG 
107 
120 
111 
40 
99 
305 
103 



1,131 

104 
632 
874 
246 
820 



440 
132 
112 
026 



1,246 
317 
2.G46 
5,349 
1,635 
42G 
1,427 



LOS A.VDKLKS — Con. 

San .lose 

San Jnnn 

SoU'dud 

WilTnington 

Cumpton 

MAUIN. (*■) 

Bolinus 

Novato 

Nieaiisio 

Point Heyes 

Sun liarnol 

Sun liiirue! 

San Antonio 

Suncclito 

Tonialcd , 



MABirOBA. («) 



MBNDOCINO. {() 
Anderson 

Andei-Mon 

Big Itiver 

Albion 

Big Hivcr(») 

Cu.per 

Cully's Cove 

Little River 

Noyo 

Novarro 

Ten-ilile liiver... 

Calpollii 

Little Lake 

Punia Arenas 

Bourn's Landing. 

Furgus's Cove 

GunTubi 

Puntn Arena's 

Ttound Vnilcy 

linund Valley lic- 

Burvalioii 

Sanol 

Ukinh 



MONO. (l() 

Antelope 

Bonlon 

Bridgeport 

Bridgeport... 



11 ON TE BEY. (ti) 
Alisa 

Salinas City 

San Antonio.... 
Cnstroville 

Castrovillo 

Monterey 

Monterey 

Pajuro ,' 

Sun Benito 

Sun Juan 



NAl'A. (id) 

Hot Springs 

Napa 

Napii City. ., 
Yonnt 



474 
44.'! 

2G5 
942 
IQO 



026 
417 
592 
271 

2,096 
8-11 
451 
731 

1,121 



1,420 
585 

1,732 
835 



679 

023 

1.911 

H6 

473 

19G 

158 

158 

80 

315 

80 

807 

946 

1,40H 

40 

40 

236 

9-JG 

444 

10 

371 
9CC 



162 
94 

174 
60 



2,72. 
609 
761 

1,802 
43G 

l,02;j 

1,112 
701 
529 

2,638 



410 
349 
162 
047 
141 



390 
213 
308 
166 
1,480 
640 
231 
319 
056 



024 
248 

912 
408 



590 
634 

1,284 

74 

318 

00 

108 

90 

00 

179 

G3 

780 

&8(i 

977 

18 

31; 

120 

603 



13 
333 
901 



140 
66 
93 
40 



2,108 
404 

585 

1,004 

371 

1,504 

896 

090 

406 

2,058 



HKVAIJA. \.r) 

BlofimUeld 

Bridfjepnrt 

Eureka 

Grass Viillev 



2.120 1,036 
8.791I2.O57 
1,879 1,268 
1,202 1,001 201 



636 
1,829 
1,249 

7,063 



C4 

9G 
103 
295 

19 



23 

204 
284 
100 
1,215 
301 
220 
412 
406 



790 
337 
820 
427 



89 
89 

027 
41 

156 

130 
50 
02 
30 

13G 
17 
27 
GO 

429 
22 
4 

no 

293 
61 



470 

440 

264 
919 6 
IGO 



608 
8G4 
665 
242 

2,456 
803 
450 
717 

1,013 



1,016 
4G3 

1,289 
69G 



616 
145 

176 
298 
G6 
419 
217 
171 
123 
680 



G17 

017 

1,046 

111 

456 1 G 

IO5I 

1681 

168 

76 
311 

80 

807 

939 

1,173 

32 

■10 
196 
905 
438 



KKVAUA. — Continued. 

Liltlo York 

Meadow Luke 

Nevada 

Itriughnnd itcudy 

Wujbinglon "... 

PLAt'ER. (y) 
I 

Hose vi Ho 



Auburn.. 



MuwcflBllc... 

Pino 

Koeklin 



16 
370 
961 



160 
91 

135 
69 



384 
1,034 

038 
3,600 



434 

1,134 
611 



202 

795 

711, 

3,367| 



2,626 
581 
720 

1,248 
425 

1,737 

1,050 
760 
616 

2,548 



1,997 

3.510 
1,743 
1,218 



586 
1,517 

903 
6,008 



60 1 



PLUM AG. {2) 

Goodwin 

Indian 

Mincrul 

Plunifis 

Quincy 

Quariz 

Rk-li Bar 

Seneen , 

"Woshingion „.. 

SACRAMENTO. \na) 

Ahibiima. 

American 

Brigliton 

Center 

Cosiinines 

Dry Creek 

Fninklin 

GoorgiaiiH 

Griiiiite 

Lee 

Mississippi 

Nulomu 

Sacra rnento 

Sun Joaquin 

Sutter 



808 
1.Q56 
8,986 
1,210 
. 838 



063 

115 
603 

1,439 
800 

2,8G0 

1,122 
923 
754 
330 

1,284 
551 
191 
642 

1,030 
250 



639 



601 
918 

2,346 
782 
281 



SANBERNABDISO. {bb) 

Belleville 

Chino 

San Bernardino 

Sun Salvador 

SAN DIEGO, (ecj 

Fort Tumn 

Colorado 

Julian 

La Pabi 

Milquuly 

Pala Valley Res- 
ervation.. 

Powy 

San Diego 

Sim Jacinto 

Son Luis lioy.... 

San Pasquul 

Siin Piifquul Val- 
ley Beservntion 

Temaculd 

"Warner's Bunch 

6AN FRANCrSCO. {lid) 

San Francisco 



739t 4 
1,239! H 



569 

60 

202 

168 



56 

308 

3,064 

660 



19 

264 

2,575 

470 



332 
330 



,000 



149.473 75,764 73,719 136.059 1330 



50 

308 

3,040 

560 



330 
229 
520 
120 
324 



46 -... 

89 1 
2,2.34 j 1 

S09j' 

275-...- 

II7L 

130 10 
243 3 



(I.) Alpine C.iiMl. : T,.iu,-l,i|,:!ii?M,lnclui1i'«-JChli.i.w; IimiiBlil[il,4 cfllnp-o; 1oivinl,(ufl, a nilncflu 



2liCMn,™VVi.MT,"i....„ ...Vhin^V.'"" " " ■■-• — —■""". ■"■■=""". '■..i-i.io«i';»"ii<T, 7- ci3[nci«iDTrldvrn. 

(cii iiiikd aiiiNij: ni.i".ti III... inciii 

Ciilniw: Klni'l, I'll, IL17 I'hl, ,.-.,.( J[i,^ii,i 

Ctiliic-i.- mill g ln,Jiiini: Wvm tti>, 1^1 

(<i> Col[ivuriu.('ii„nl)-: Tmimi-IiIii 1 nl-.. iudii 

Np-. 1. M. iinil n. oniiDi...d lu A-irulof U.-unly [u 1B.-.3, noil no cl.J.nBC nlmlo in Ilio K.miilnli.K nnn.Cr ^-''l""'-'. Tuiv..al,ri« 



, &1 O.lnrai' nnd i IndJnn,; ConWH-, ITS Chlnco; CIilco.MO Cl.ineso; nnniillon, 17n 
n-" ,lZl I i l^,,)"!^ "" '"'"""'i ''Pli"'. ^<B ClilQcio; OrcE.ni. « t'lilawu; Ura, 13 

■ "^ "" :.;""""'''[' '•■ «W Cliln«o: lo«uiIil|, 0, 250 ClirnMO; lown.liln 7, 91 



iji OAiink County- Bmionl^Hnduili-* U Clilncso omnn ImNi.nB: CWnti l^:irilirVJ^VmMUiTn"iU,i»-' Crr.,,! t i i Pn m i 

»n'l'7 ^nlL". "" T„»n*l,l,. 1 «1id include. 10 CUinc.o and -2 Indtun.; loivfi.hl,, ■-, 17 <;hlno,c; ,o,vnehlp 5, 117 CLinow 

(A) Del NiiiifiOnnly: Crescnl nl*> fndlndi-sni Clilni^eond J07 rnillni 
20 CtiliX'iii nnil !, Iiiiliiinn; Sinilli'a Itlivr, .'I ''lilm-i- iirid '.^7.1 Indlnnn 

H] Kl D.iradu O.ni.Iy: rolonui nlw li.cliid. - 'il.-i i h.,,.-,-, | lod'hin 

DfuBignrl SprinK, IGO Cliinrw nnd 4 Indl.m-, i; -. iniv,,. h; nilnc 

Yolkv, andiiao; MDuntiiln, M Cbin™.; J[o,l ^l.^ll 
Onh,lSCMiii^sB. 

Ijl Fr<wi,o t'imnly: Toitnilili) I a[ta Inclndc-j2;l Clilne 
3. BCIilnwHOdaTllnillno*. 

.j;;d?r^:„'i.in^ty;irv;';rlT,':;l;;nV"^'"""='^"™^ 



■J^'?,''"""" "^""'y: Jimmrliro nlao Incluiira I Chlnmo; r«ng ValluT, eCUinmooad 1 Jailaa; Uiironl.l Clilnfao: SomnTOIc, 
M Ltllni1»rp. 

(|() Loi AnRPlra Couiitjr; El JInnto nisii Includr* fi Cldii(*>T Ixb AnptlPt 10 ChlntM rniJ 09 Inrirnni: La* Aneelra Cilj.172 
Lmirst nnd 111 Indhn.; Ltm Sli.n-. D Cliinwe; Sun Rfll-rii'l.T Cliln«i. nud :; JapanMo; SaLLi Atlo, IS Cbiunw «qJ 1 Indian: 
SoIcd,t , I Cl.l,i.™; Wilmiiigimi. IS niln«... Ut Ansol.- mcIu-.Ivb uf cilj of Loi AngnlM. 

(r) »l,irluCuiiiU)-; lMlnn«M|.uinclnd.dllChlni-.DnndlilIndrji)«; Xuviilu.a'J Cliin«i>nnJ II Imlian-: ^■icl«.lD,^ niTn«e«nil 
.T-T Indinn*: I'l.inl Id:),.., n nilnrii.ai.d 18 hMm,; S..n llafBel, lUO Cliln.soond aa Indlnn.; Sin .InUinlo, 1 Chlow; SancelIlo,6 
Chriira.'HnilOIndliint: Toinnli-, U7 ChlntJi'ond 11 linl.iioii. -^ , ^ 

(«) Sla.liKjwi ro.inijT Tm/n*!.!!. 1 n!-o inchidw ;17J Chhiwo and T Iiiillniis; townshln " li.'iCliluoso: (owulilp 3. SSI) Cblnua 
iiiidL'i, lodinn.; r.nvi,-l,lp4,al4ailni.*PQnill iiiJhm. 

'Il 31. nit.t III.. I'.jMiil}-: Andi.|>on ol-o imlndrs J ailnMc nndnn Indlnm; Itlp Illrcr. 21 niioojcnndsja Inddina; LUtIc Lnkf. 

, „ - niiB.aiCldncwnndim ludliiH.: Ilonml Viil|py.4 Indli.ns: Siinpl, I lodln,,; Oki»li.4 OiInaKanil llndbiu. 

(uj .Miinul'.iinily: AiiU'lMiwoIiolntludrii 2 lndlun>; ltonl.)ii. IK'lilnco; llri.!(tP|)0rt,39 HilOfW. 

IIT..J Cuunlj : Aliii-i nlK: li,uludM :I2 Cliin.Tip nnil CO Indiana: rMtn.v,llp. 4;i HiinMO nod 3 IndlnDj; Monltnj-, M 



7 I 



»; IluppyOimp, 103 Clilnpio nnil oaindduia; Jtounlnln, 
nd 22 Jninncs"; rmumnM. 70 CldnoJo nnd 1 Iiidlnn : 

..^,in„o^i•i:i.5;;i::s^!i,^;;■^)'!SL;ft■i;^;^(Sll!^ 

1 ttnilOWIudlnni; lo.ni.lilp 2,303 ClilnBonnd B28 Indiana; tuHinlilp 



(i:) SI 
Cliln 
t 



ilni'.i.mi.ltUIndlni,.; I'njnr.', I Lliin.*..; iNin HciiIIu, la ludlnn.: S..n Jnnn. 02 Chiiii-c nn.l'.t) rnd:ani.. ' ' 

finl ^j,(M County: Hut Si-ringn nlw, include* IIJ CliluHu uud4 Inillnni; Xuiiti. Ha Chinoso nmUG Indlins; Vount, 7 Chinwe 

id lU Indiinui. 

Ifi Npn.dii County: Dloomllold alio lnrlndM47 CliEnMo; nrldgoport, a(« Chin.« andalndlini; EiirrlBi,33a Cblnnw; Gnui 
\nlli\\..ll)| I.Iiln.-,<D iiimI 4 Jntllanai I.illlg V.irk, 128 Cliinvx; JlMdoir L..kr,4W Cliincsov N*™lil. 603 Chlnwu nnJ I Indlnn: 
HuiiBl, ,i„il Itp.iily. ISU Cliln.'M mid 1 Iiidliin ; W.mlilnKliin. Ifi'i ChNuTO. 

U/i I'liiL-.if r.iiiiiij: ru»-i,.l,l|i 1 a\:. Iri.lml.-. ,-.'i I h(,i,~,.: („„ 'J, 211 dUnraw; lournihlp 3,33-2 ChlnBs: Irtwoihlp 4.SM 

\\",."', ..' '"-'"'•'■ l""i"li M-\ lli.i' ; i..„i.-l,l|M., .111 ,.■: li...n.lilpJ.S7Chiuow, lowMliln 8,30 CbliiMt; Wnn- 

i,hl|i:i. lr.7 I III,,,,,., ,,11) 1 i,„||,iii^ i,>»ii-liij. Ill, i,.i r ,..; r,-, ll,;i|Cl,lnr«.v ' 

\:l I'M, III.., I'.. 1101): iluNli.lii iil«o lu,l.i.li3L'l5i'iilii.".,; lNdUii,.-,7ililin-c..inilOIodliin»: MIntral. 17* ClilnMBj I'lumu-lli 
Clllnp«.-; gnnrlfi. I.'l.loi*..; Itl.li Ikir, SdClm.,....; jKn^u. TJ ITlnoMo: Wellington, 1« Clilnf-^ 

(na) Sicninii.niu C.iunry: Alnlii ....-— 



[litl ifnn lli.runr.llu.1 i:'>iiti.ly: Siin It, 
f..«l S,in ni.'B,. (.■ounl); Furt Yniii.i ul 
,iid 2 Iiiilliina: fi.tn Liil< Iti.y, L'l) Indlnn', 
(lid] Sim rmniliix. Cuuiily; djn Fniiiciico, 12,022 Clil 
(•J Oraionduciiiu. 



nliu Inclndiv 10 Clilnino. 
Inclnduj I Chlneiu; JulUii.S Chlnno; Powy, I ChlnMr; Snn Pirgo I'dy.CI CIiIbi- 

0, M Indtnni, Dn<l 6 JajiaiiGK.. 



POPULATION OF CALIFORNIA, MINOR CIVIL DIVISIONS. Etc.-Continued. 



18i 



KAK JOAqini'. (a) 

CnslonB 

Dont 

DoukIob 

SJkhorn 

Elliott 

Liberty 

O'Ncnl. 

SUickUiQ 

TnUiro 

Union 



1,1&4 

1,115 
1,761 

1,231 

1,710 
10,0(10 
1,20D 



KAN LUIS onlBFO. C'JI 

Arroyo Grfindo 776 

Moro 02T 

Siilinns 070 

S.in Luis Obispo 1|G70 

Snnln Ro»« | I.IH 

HAN MATBC. (c) 

1, Ban Bruno 1,209 

2. Snii Miituo 1 977 

8. Pulgna I lt^38 

■I. Rodwciod ' 027 

Jl..Jwood City..] 727 

5. Hoir-iloon Bny 1,005 

G. PoBcadoro 008 

I 

BANTA BAUBARA. [d) j 

1. Hnn Biionii von turn. 2,491 

2. SnnUi llarbaru ', 4,255 

3. Sunla Inez [ 1, 

SANTA OLAHA. (e) 

Almiiden 1 1.047 

Atviso 68B 

Burnotl ' 802 

Fremont S 2,018 

Gilroy i 3,196 

Gilroy I 1|025 

Milpitfls ! 665 

KedwoDd I 1,868 

S.inluClnru 3,400 

Sitn Job6(/) 8,420 

Sftn Josd 0,080 



9B0 

051 

1,300 

1,215 

S13 

1,020 

1,22-1 

5,004 

002 

260 



601 

571 
477 

1,172 
1,012 



867 j 
478 
800, 
400 
448| 
1,012 
481 



2,119 

3,561 
858 



224 
1G4 
355 
213 
141 
202 
405 
4,102 
277 
53 



175 

GO 

202 

407 

mi 



002 
499 
038 
218 

279 
0G3 
228 



372 
G9I 
180 



BANTA CRUZ, (a) 

Pnjnro 

Wntionviilo 

Sonla Criii! 

Simla CrUB 

Soquol 



SHASTA. (A) 



3,114 
1,151 
4,430 
2,561 
1,103 



924 



flan 


767 


ai4 


274 


naa 


260 


1 ?fi? 


760 


?474 


721 


i,?no 


425 


4HP 


177 


l.O^P 


30G 


?r.J-i 


925 


2,374 


1,046 


5,334 


8,755 


2,449 


GG5 


- 01 H 


251 


sa-if 


1,090 


1,035 


026 


9Q3 


230 


Oil 


31.1 



1,002 

1,007 
1,695 
1,871 

024 
I.IGO 
1,409 
8,820 
1,246 

319 



782 

005 
G44 

1,600 
1,080 



1,088 
835 

1,1)81 
014 
712 

1,661 
010 



2,894 

4,109 

081 



1,GS0 

460 

702 

1,004 

8,090 

1,544 

6G8 

1,384 

3,276 

3,110 

8,270 



3,004 
1,098 
4,349 
2,500 
1,179 



796 



8UA8TA.— Continued, 

5 



7 



5591 
113 
859 
S56 
957 
359 
640 



SlBUltA. li) , 

Butto ; 1,182 

Downievillc ! 704 

Eureka 1 350 

Forest 748 

Allugimny ' 240 

Forest City 152 

Gibson 620 

Lincoln , 010 

Scnr3 758 

Siorni 086 

TitbloEock 769 

siBKiifon, (,j| 

Big Vnlloy 246 

Butto 410 

Cottonwood 421 

HutnbuF 251 

KlnuiiilTi 84 

Scott Rivor 440 

Scott Volley 1,259 

South 039 

Surpriso Viillcy 649 

TnLlcKoclf 327 

Yrokn , 1,816 

TrekiiCity 1.008 

SOLANO. {!;) ' 

BcniciiL 1,050 

Denverton -170 

Green Vnlloy 592 

- - ■ 80 
761 
80 
160 
347 



Bridgeport.... 

SInin Prnirie 

■ Biiigbnmton 

Main Pntirio 

Monleiiumu 

EioTifila 

Bio Vista 

Silveyvillo 

Bntavia 

DiKon 

Silveyvillo 

SuiBun 

FiiirHold 

SuisunCity 

Tremont 



319 
1,683 
200 
817 
279 
1,842 
329 
462 
640 



Vacnviilo I 1,701 



1971 
93 
325 
.805 
022 
142 
842 



634 

803 
11? 
400 
145 
02 
240 
292 
318 
566 
340 



240 

342 

161 

71 

33 

171 

708 

632 

690 

280 

1,007 

732 



1,045 

287 
405 
03 
613 
78 
142 
233 
517 
216 

1,184 
IGO 
109 
207 

1,268 
244 
363 
439 

1,307 



362 


266 


2 


20 


104 




84 


350 




51 


862 


3 


.■ts 


054 




217 


206 


1 


204 


478 


•2 



646 
811 

283 
848 
05 
60 
271 
824 
440 
120 
410 



6 

08 
2G0 
180 

61 

275 
461 
407; 

50! 

411 

719: 

881 



999 
571 
236 
034 
223 
141 
476 
408 
039 
679 
655 



246 
878 
230 
131 
40 
221 
983 
729 
648 
322 
1,422 
881 



611! 
1831 
187! 
17 
148! 

.SI 

lUl 
371 
103 
449 
44 
118 



1,609 
465 
612 
78 
760 
80 
160 
828 
790 
312 
1,036 
190 
293 
72 i 267 
674; 1,567 
851 826 
99 443 
201 1 632 
8941 1,630 




'''W ^\il;> Itorl..raCounly: San nuonavcntuni B1.0 Incluck. 14 n,m.,,c »nJ 78 InJbn.; a^i.ta 
Jcaft 2hD'Ci,1nc3n und i Iniliaiis; Siii JdbS Cily, 114 CIiIiims. 

---~- '■' —,1.7 Oiliitao; Tnblc lloct, IBJ Clilii 



nilnce.^ Snim.llO ailne.ip; SI. 



LtooJ, 184 Chinese nnJCInclianB; lIuinl.UK. 120 Chi- 



(j^Bl.kTyau County : H""" "^,1".?':,'!':'^^;'^',;"; -1 alCTnia'^tX::7h^onyni\iV. Sf Chin.-.. .L.t fi l,,m.-M ; Soath. 
nwo; Vocavlllc, mCTilncKU; Ynllcjo, 18D ChrntM. 



SOL AX 0. — Continued. 

Tuca Station 

VncBville 

VftUejo 



120 

348 1 

6,391 j 

SONOMA. (1} 

Annoly 2,874 

Bodegu 1,407; 

Cloverdalo 612 

Hciildsburg 060| 

Mendocino 2,600, 

Petuliimn,... 4,588| 

Ru^ian Bivor 9871 

SaltPoint 1.0881 

Santa Itosn 2,808] 

Sonouiii 1,613 

Viillojo ' 1.114' 

Wiifhinglon 648 



Qovscrvllle 



081 



280! 
4,015 

2,004 
1,000 

638 

838 

2,417 

3,372 

877: 

o-iol 

2,669 

967 

770 

612 

G-1 



STANISLAOS. ili't 

Brnnt-b 787; 

Buonn Vialo 357j 

Emory 843 

Empiro 2,993 

Nortb 228 

Sun Jonquin 1,015 

"Wnsbington ' 281 

SOTTER. (ni 

Butto : 1,850 

Kicbolaus 799 

Sutler i 1,075 



Vernon. 
Yuba, 



TEHAMA, (n) 

Antelope 

Bnttlo Creek 

Boll Mills 

Cotlonwcud 

Hunter's [ 

Lassen j 

Mill Creek 

Molino(p) 

Toomea's Grant... | 
Pasniienta [ 

Sloney Creek. — | 
Piivne'E Creek 



700 
998 



820 
190 

79 
240 

40 
240 

80 



507 
248 
007 
2,573 
187 
803 
232 



1,063 
034 
770 
050 
600 



44 
64 

2,876 

870 
407' 
74 
121 
273 
1,210 

no 

448 
329 

556 

844 

30 

14 



100 
109 
880 
420 

80 
212 

49 



276 
165 
299 
149 
192 



115 



0,156 



279 
181 

76 
100 

87 
178 

70 



50 



2,343 

1,807 

009 

039 

2,050 

4,422 

078 

947 

2,850 

1,371 

1,093 

645 

65 



783 
810 

602 
2,046 

220 
1,006 

276 



1,298 

773 

1,025 

744 
951 



298 
169 

78 
237 

38 
208 

60 



TRiNiTi. — Continued. 
Lewis ton 

Mincrsville I 102 

Trinity Centre 160 

.lunction City-. 670 

CnfionCity i 130 

Junction City 440 

North Fork , 401 

Wcnverville i 1.800 

Douglaa City. ..■.■, 411 

Hay Fork Valley. 172 

Weavervillo ' 816 

TUI-AltE. (l-l 

FamiersviUo ) 807 

King's River 106 

Piickn-ood 1 214 

Tulo River I 1,098 

Tule Indian Rc^- | 

ervation 12 

Venice , 400 

Viflnlin 1,026 

Vieulin 913 

"Whito Rivor 120 

TDOLUMKE. {"i 

i. Sonorn 2,480 

Sonorn ! 1,322 



40 

350 

76 

80 

Red Bluff. ' 1,032 



Red Bluff.. 

Tehama 

Merrill's,. 



TillNlTT. Ii/i 

Indian Creek 

Indian Creek. 



992 
881 
124 



783 
183 



87 
815 

68 
80 
793 
755 
092 
103 



864 
57 



2. Coltimbiti., 

Columbia ., 

3. Chinese Camp., 

4. Big Oak Flat... 



2,102 
1,125 

2,320 
1,249 



230 

237 

289 

21 



410 
126 



76 
80 
043 
904 
624 
117 



513 
102 



TOI.O. (/| 

Buokoye 

Ciicbo Creek 

Cottonwood 

Fremont 

Grafton 

Mcrritt 

Puliih ! 1,412 

■\VnBliinglon I 809 

YUBA, (ul 

East Benr River.. 

Foster's Bar 

Linda 

Long Bar 610 

Mnrvsvillo (f) , 483 

Maryaviila i 4,738 

Now York ', 542 

North Eost 363 

Parke Bar i 250 

Rose's Bur , 1,101 

Slate Range ' 880 

West Bear Rivor i 407 



860 

3,007 

1,819 

91 

1,861 

480 



140 
54 
107 
108 
37 
161 
188 
047 
120 
142 
385 



766 
148 

172 
068 

10 

470 

1,877 

707 

87 



1,383 
787 

1,235 
026 

1,016 
648 



780 
2,462 
1,152 

75 
1,486 

282 
1,020 

502 



425 
286 
283 
378 
314 
2,858 
371 
162 
153 
079 
441 
304 



102 
48 
63 
372 
08 
279 
273 
752 
201 
430 
81 



52 
18 
42 

146 

2 

16 
240 

200 
Q3 



1,106 
635 
967 
GOO 

1,204 
701 



121 

605 

167 

16 

875j 
108! 
892| 
2471 



178 
238 
118; 
141 1 
1191 

i.aeo! 

171 
211 
97 
512 
439 
103 



190 
76 
136 
320 
1 
•>iP 

j:30 

870 
187 
128 
564 



796 
162 
214 

1,082 

12 

487 
1,540 

855 
08 



32 



2,211 
1,170 

1,944 

1,017 

1,640 

861 



788 
2,049 

1,253 

60 

1,741 

482 
1,320 

740 



500 
393 
374 
471 
374 

3,225 
507 
190 
243 

1,112 
609 
368 



a, Sc,,ou,. C.nn.y: Anj«.y .1.0 indndc. 11 Ch.nc.^^^^^^^^ 
^t?sS.?;;ri,>^V.'Sr»t'',SKi.^'y;l^^^^^^^^^^ a„no„; S..Ur.40 a.,n.o: V„m=n..O Ch,n... V„h.,« 

Tohl^u-i M^,d I l5.di7,»l K..'l ntilrr S "ciilncao ..lid * Indlnn.; Tehinm, 1K3 Chinese oad 3B Indinn.. 



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SANTA CLARA CO., CALIfORNIA. 

OAT€ Of SETTLEMENT MARCH JOSI. 






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SPRING RANCH. ALMAOEN TP.. SANTA CLARA CO.. CAL. 






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R LULRS Qt*l.r AtL houses JUT£ TO S£T A CCfTTA/Af 

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MAP NUMBER TEN. 



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THE WORKS AND TP 



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C MINCNELW ALMADEN. 



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RES. ST CHARLES C SMITH , 



STORE & RESIDENCE of r. J . SMITH 
CVCnOREEN , SANTA CLAf^A CQ.,CAL. 




, Cv£fiCRCEf/, ■A^jTA Clara Co., Cal. 



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SAINT JAMES HOTEL, />fljtr ST SAN JOS£, Cac, D. B. UOWREY, PFfo^tfiETOR. 








!f£s. or M.SCHALLENBERGER 



San JQSZ Tf.. Santa Clara Co.. Ca^'^'o^'--'-^ 



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105 



BUSINESS DIEECTORIES 

OP THE 

CITIES AND TOWNS OF SANTA CLAEA COUNTY. 



Abel, Wm 

AdHms, Wm. 11 

Atlunia, Wni 

Ailurnn, .1. U 

Alvord, Henry 11... 



■tniDlllCL 



S.Pedro ASLJiiniM 

19G First St 

Gnmt St 

Ifl4 PiMt St 

ITSMurketSt 



Arum, E. W JKnox Ul.jck.. ,"!!!!'' 

Ar<!iior t Loviill.... 314 Tlrst St 

Arclicr, T. B Sunlii Cliira St....'.!'. 

Ashley, W. Gt-orgif 374 St. John St 



Aii/oriiis, John 



AiiKorniB&Pomroy 363 & 871 Market St 

nnlbncli, John 2d & PmintHiii Sta.. 

Rnriic>-, A. H 674 PiratSt 

Biirr, ChariM 

Dtirris, E 

Hurry, W.D 

Biirker & Townu.... 
Upuns. T. Elliird . 

Ucchatoin, 11 

Buldcn,D 

Hulloli, J.A 

BorcBlrom, Chris... 
BiriT, Ibhhc & C. T.. 

Bishop, Sntnl. A 

Bhick, J. C 

Bhickmoro, Win.... 

Ilhiin, George 

Hhnid, J. 

Bodley, E. C 

Hiiess itSogo 

Boring, S.W 

IJOEC, J. F 

.Boscliken, J 

Bowman, Williiim.. 

Jlowinnn, G. B 

Beyers, Ciiry Lee... 

Bnidey, E. L 

Briidley, Mrs. S 

Briily, J. M 

Brailleo, E. S 

Brower, George 

Bruyfoglo, C. W.... 

Broyfogle, E. S 

Briggs, J. B 

Brown, W. S 

Bryiint, B 

Builor, Flovd li 

Burkolt & JIcKce... 
Uiirkhiirl, Alhurt... 

.Bnrl, J. J 

Biichnor, D. M 

L'lihalun, Jus 

Caine, Chnrlcii 

Caldwell, S. B 

Cftrinichup], J 

Oarrull, T... 

Ciirroll, WillUim... 

CnmpboII, J. A 

Carter, J. S '. 

Ciispiiri, Joseph 



First St 

Alamcdn 

AIniiidon St 

FiritSt 

101 First SI 

First St 

11th &Santa Clara. 
3d & St. FornaMdu., 

St. John St 

Willow Grove 

AInmuda 

488 Third St 

St. James' Hotel.... 

Lineoln Ave 

258 Third St 

IftandSt. JohiiStH. 

343-345 First St 

Foiirtli St 

232 UalbachSt. 

417 First St 

Boryesfii Bond 

16 Jnekpon SI... 

San JosiS 

Snnnl A: Sntith Su.. 

Eiist Sun Josij 

Second St 

Ahinieda 

Sun Antonio St 

3dandSt.Jnrac.;Sls. 



Chnso, J. W 

Chaac, S. H 

Ccsonn, Itumon S... 

Ohi|imun, L. J 

Uhujiard, L 

Ghrisnian & Uo 

Christian, John 

Churehill, S. W 

Cily Slables 

Clark, A. M 

Clark, E. A 

Clurk, James 

Clark, S. A 

Chirk, Wm. W 

Clayton, J. A 

Colahan, John T... 

Colahnn, W. J 

Caldwell, A. B 

Colby, Jamoa T 

CiiJey, J. M 

Coll. of Notre Dame 



Market St 



s^flLXt jross CITY. 



IDSIIBSS. 



Vnlloy Mnrblo Works.... 
Physician 



Grocer 

Deputy Sheriff". 

Butcher ,,,„ 

Sheriir. 

Hardware 

Attorn ey-ftt- law 

Atlorncys-at-lftw 

Livery stnblo 

Clerk 

Merchant 

Wholesale grocers and 
general nierchundiae.... 

Wagon mnniifaclnrer 

Horse dealer and breaker. 

Burlon Ale House 

Carpenter and builder .... 

Parmer 

Pro.N. Y.Exchango Hotel 

Banker 

Butcher 

District Judge 

Groceries and liquors 

Blacksmith Apluw milker 

Farmers 

Capitalist 

Atlorney-at-law 

Saloon keeper 

Carpenter 

Real estate agt.A auction'r 
Private boarding-houBo... 

Grocers and glassware 

Secretary of Water Co.... 

Farmer „ 

Builders' material 

Parmer 

Minister M. E. Church... 

Teacher 

Farmer 

Qrucerieiftnd liiiuors 

Real estate broker 



iiiiTin. 



Kentucky 

California 

Ohio 

Illinois 

New York 

Cnlifornin 

Eslnbl'ed 1865 

Georgia 

California 

Franco 



Via 



1852 

1854 

18411 
lS(i3 



1875 

issi 



Germany 

New Yo'rk 

Establ'ed 1603 

New Ydrk 

Missouri 

oiiio.. ..!!."!!!!! 

Germany 

Connecticut.... 

Italy 

Wisconsin 

England 

Virginia 

Pennsylvania.. 

Illinois 

New York 

N. Carolina..., 

Ohio 

Establ'ed 1872 

Tennessee 

Germany 



South and Race Sts, Farmer 

540 Market Si Engineer 

Mnnturey Road Stock raiser 

Guadalupe Mines... Mail carrier 

First St ArchiteeU 

248 First St Carpenter 

Com. Bank B'Iding Atturnev-nt-law 

230 First St Barber..". 

710 First St Proprietor of hack line... 

Twelfth St Fruit grower. 

268 Third St Carpenter 

140 Sun Fernando.. Grocer 

Alameda Blncksmitl 

Sun Fernando & 2d. What Cheer Hotel 

Willow St Fruitgrower 

162 First St Grain dealer 

260 Market St Hotel keeper and leader of 

San Jo.'fi Band 

4th & St. John Sts.. Lumber dealer 

281 Third St Dealer in lumber 

040 First St Slock trader 

004 Second St ]Supt. of schools 

ISO San Carlos St.. .1 Watchmaker and jeweler. 
1st & San Fornandi- Livery, feed & ealesliihles. 



Collins, W. T 716 First St.. 

Collins, W. H - 

CuloFnbct, C 

Congialo, N 

Cook.C. C 

Conk, C. W 

Cory, A. J 

Cory, Benjamin 

Cottle, B. H 

CoUle, Ira 

Cr«j<M!it & Olement. 
D'Ablaing.WTGL 
Datnonte, Anlonio.. 

Davis, Mose.s 

Dawton, J, 31 



Do Kochcbrune, A., 



Island William Stfl. Carriage manufuclurer.,.. 

Santa Clurit St Prop. AuKorais Houae 

Livery stable 

Almadon St Farmer 

7th & St. Julian Sts. P.M. & real estate broker. 

FJrst St Harness maker is saddler. 

372 First St General inorebandiso 

257 Third St Government clerk 

2!)CJ Santa Clara St.. Real csliito broker 

ririh St H„nk teller 

519 Sixth St Searcher of records 

457 Second St Physician 

Minnesota Ave Pruit grower 

Almnden St Farmer 

Santa Clara St V'lung Ladies' College.... 

Blacksmith 

Com. Bank B'Iding Atiornoy-at-law 

Santa Clara St Capitalist 

San Jw& Pastor St. Joseph's Church 

Sixth St Contractor ana builder.... 

435 Third St ICarpcntor and builder 

Physician and surgeon.... 

Physician 

Printer and publisher. 

Farmer 

Atlorneys-at-law ^.™„. ... 

Physician Holland 

Candy ftianufoclurer i Italy 



Pennsylvania.. 

Iowa 

Missouri 

New York 

Ireland 

Missouri 

Mas°achiis(>tLs. 

England 

Ohio 



1849 
1866 

1873 
1845 

i"840 
1875 
1853 
1858 
1874 
1849 
1849 
1S58 
1859 
1864 
184!) 
1873 

1849 
1850 
1664 
1849 
1865 
1802 



vita 
am 

UOo. 



185^1 
1853 



1875 

1851 



1866 



1873 
1850 



1875 
1870 
1869 
1874 
18IT0 
1800 

1873 
1861) 
1850 
1873 

1800 

1864 
I85S 
1805 
1807 



tt>.tl 



San Jose..,. 



80 



New Y'ork 

Scotland 

South Carolina 
Maryland 

Germany 

Alabama , 

Russia 

3Iassachusctls, 

Kentucky 

Slissouri 

Ohio 

Ireland 

N. Cnrolinii.... 
N. Hampshire. 

Italy 

Maine 

Mexico 

California 

Switzerland ... 
Pennsylvania.. 
Isle of Man.... 
Vermont 



1850' 1873 
'185411872 

1850 

1800 

1870 

1872: 1872 
1872 1872 



1852 
1874 
1849 
11876 

;1850 
I6T3 
1 1809 
h852 



|1864!j864 



528 Second St. 

Wilcox Block 

109 San Antonio.... 

Lincoln Ave 

25 Knox Block 

Alrnuden Road 

Hensley Block 

San JoBo 

Alameda 



Nebraska 

Ohio 

Ireland 

Miissachusoltf. 

California 

England 

Maryland 

Ireland 

Kentucky 

MassiichuBotts 
Now York 



France 

Italy 

Indiana 

Maine 

Ohio 

Maine 

Missouri 

Esliibrod 187i; 



Frevoflt. 



Farmer 

Prca.&SeerotarySan Ji>s6 

Fruit-Packing Co 

OnpitaliBt 



Vermont. 



Maryland. 
France , 



18(18 
18G0 
1808 
1852 
1850 
1852 

1859 
1859 
1840 
1853 
1859 

1854 
1804 

I 

,i874 
1850 
1853 
1850 

isso 

1851 
1852 

1858 
1858 
1874 



1804 
1875 
1852 
1875 

1869 
1873 
1875 
1852 



1809 

1858 
1868 



I87I 
185fi 
185!) 
1840 

1800 

1855 



1876 



1853 
1850 



1871 
1875 



1872 1872 
180811808 
1 842 1 1842 

1864! 

1858:1858 
18001805 

ISfiO' 

1847 1847 

1861 

1854 1854 

187311873 
I860 1874 
1850,' 1850 



1870 
1851 



1870 
1870 



210 
240 

485 



91 



^ 



500 



200 
240 



466 



15 
130 
]50 

5 
15 



665 

640 
00 
60 



UHS. 



Devinc, Davis 

Diggs, W. H 

Dnerr, Philip 

Dotla Bros 

Douuherty, W. P... 

Du Buis, OyruH 

DudllcId, James 

DiilFey, H. W 

Kgan, Thomas 

Kkhtrom, A. JI 

Ellis, W. F 

EmpoyA Lonnard. 

Enright, Joseph 

Erkens, W 

Erkson, A. C 

Fallon, Thomas 

Farmers' Union 

Farmers' National 
Gold Bank 

Featherstone, Geo... 

PeiM Bros 

Field.Uomh^ifc Ken- 
dall 

Finlev, C 

Fischer, Wm 

Flickinger, J. C 

Foil?., j. D 

Footo, Mrs. E. A... 

Francescowitch,.!... 

Frascr, Thomas E. 



RUIDSaoi. 



Biiniir. 



180 First St 

Market St 

4th & William Sts. 
279 Market St 

4th & San Fernando 

Race Track 

Auber St 

491 Fifth St 

256 First St 

415 Seventh St 

116 Eleventh St 

202 Sanhi Clara St.. 
Isli, Williiim Sts.. 

Sun Salvador 

522 Second- St 

Sail Pedro St 

2d&SanlaClaraSt5 

1st & Santa ClarnSta 

290 First St 

Istifc Santa Clara Sts 



277 Second St 

Julian and Market. 
249 Santa Clara Si.. 

519 Tenth St 

122 First St 

Minnesota Ave 

First St 

San Jose 



Atiorney-at-law New York 

American Hotel ! Virginia 

Brewery and soda works., 'Germany 

Saloon and boarding-) 

huu.=e keepers Switzerland..,. 

Lumber merchant Ireland 

Race-lrack keeper New York 

Plasterer England 

Retired , Tennessee 

Grocery and provision Ireland 

Itctired.... Sweden..,. 

Lumberman Massachusetts. 

Harnessmakcrs&saddlers Eslabl'ed 1872 

Foundry and boiler shop.llrcland 

Capitalist 'Belgium 

" INew York 

" Ireland 

General merchandise 



V i jiBiji, j.iiuiiiii:i i!j... oaii jose. 

Freeman, T. A 14th &.lacksiin Sts. 

Froysehliig, C 327 Julian St 

Friunt, Alf. 

Fuller, James U.... 

Fuller, A. C 

Fuller, F. B 

Gari'ilow, L. D 

Gash, John 

George, Givens 

Gill, Wm. L 

Gliubetieh, S 

Gliubelich, M 

Golden it Merediil. 

Gordon, J. H 

Goodrich, Levi 

Gould, Joseph 

Graham, B. F 

Green, W. U 

Grieve, John 

Hall,Wni. H 

Hamilton, A. B 

Uatman & Norman- 
din 

Hart, James 

Harper, R. B 

Hanchett, L. J 

HH,skell, H.J 

Uiiub, Jacob 

Haynes, N 

Havden,E. B 

Heilyor. D 

Ik-iidrix, J. Frank 
Henderson, W. H... 

Henderson, J 

Hensley, Ghas. It... 
licringer, John C... 

fli'mandez, E 

Herrmann, A. T.... 
Herringlon, D. W.- 
Horold, Phil 



First St 

I4lh it .Mission Sts. 

Willow Si 

Istvt William Sts.. 

Bush St 

286 First St 

San Jose 

292 First St 

284 First St 

Isl and Grant Sts... 
351 Santa Clara St.. 

Knox Block 

Third St 

23 Kno.\ Block 

242 First St 

-Market & St. John 

206 First St 

367 Fifth St 

411 Second St.... 

1st & Fountain Sts. 

San Jose 

San Carlos St 

Fir-st St 

296 Market St 

Santii Clara St 

3a2 Fifth St 

301 Third St 

Ea.'it San Josii 

483 FirstSt 

503 Market St 

107 First St 

Race St 

51G Market St 

7th and Reed Sis.... 

Siinta Clara St 

Fir-it St 



Banking 

Cigars and tobacco 

Dry goods 

Marble works 

County Clerk 

General merchandise 

Cattle dealer 

General inerchandiso 

Fruit grower 

Restaurant spt 

Agt. for Jas. Lick 

Hanker 

Merchant 



Establ'ed 1874 



Teamster and contractor.. 
Agl. Weed Sewing Much. 

Gardener 

Lumbermnn 

Architect 

Saloon keeper 

Attorney-at-law 

CulTee saloon 

Restjmrant and lodgings.. 
BlacksmilliMS; gen jobbers 
Plumber and gas fitter ... 

Architect 

Clerk 

Contractor & bridge bldr. I " 

Wines and liquors England 

General merchandise Scollnnd 



England 

Germany 

E.tcel.Mnr.Co. 

New York 

Germany 

Pennsylvania.. 
Ohio 

Austria 

Nova Scotia 
Ohio 

Germany 

Now York 

.MufsachiifetL'i 
Connecticut.... 

Maine 

Ireland 

Missouri 

New York 

Daimalia 

Sclavonia 



loSuii 

1849 
1851 

1853 

180R 
1859 
1853 



taOo. ; 

1848 

1874! 
1853, 

1874 
1859 
1874 



fo.»r 

ICRS. 



San Joae,... 



1805 I80G 

1864 

1863 

1867 

1806 



1855 
1850 
1840 
1854 



1800 
I8G3 



England 

Now York 



1852 
1800 
1849 
1875 
1874 
1875 
1867 



I BUG 
1853 
1807 
ISOO 

1855 
18G8 
1851 



1869 
1863 



1800 
1840 
1875 
1874 
1875 
1878 
1852! 1874 



20 



320 
6,000 



1840 

1857 
1871 



1852 
1872 
1849 
1874 
1871 1871 



1850 



1867 
1871 



1874 
1853 



661 



500 



1851 



Hester, Wm.F 

Hewson, John B.... 

Hioka, Thos P. B.. 

Hills, Mrs. M 

Hills, H. E 

Hills, Miles Minnejota&Li'coln 

Higginbothiim.WP Willow St 

Hinds & Miirduek.. 384 First St 

linbbs, C. X Alameda 

HoJlmann, Victor... San Francisco 

HOhner, J. W At R.K. Depot. 

Hollis, W. H ■ 

Holdon, Nicholas... 
Homo Mutual Life 

Ins. Co 

Houghton, S. 

Howes, Bam. P 

Hughes, W. E 

Hurley, .luhn D 

Huyck, A. L 

lves,G. G 

Jayne,D. R 

Jolmsun, John 

Jones & Reardson.. 

Joifrey, Wm 

Kell, Thomas 



Alameda 



U. S. Hotel 

Alameda. 

San Jose 



1st & Virginia Sts.. 
404 First St 



SanJofiBk-B'Iding 
.lutiiin & Third St.-. 

510 Fourth St 

480 Eighth St 

Center St 

Thirteenth St 

St. John St 

Mission & Sixth Sis 

493 First St 

815 Santa Clara St.. 
S. Clara & S. Pedro 
Ahiincda Road 



Farmer 

Carpenter 

X'acific Carriage Factory. 

Dry goods 

Supt. No. Almadon Mines 

Capitalist 

Carriage depository 

Saloon keeper 

Carpenter and contractor. 

Capitalist 

Farmer 

Ulacksmith 

Farmer 

Stock raiser 

Orchardisi 

Ranchero 

Surveyor & civil engineer 

Attornoy-at-law 

Boots, shoes, leather, and 

findings 

Farmer 

Chief clork in Secretary ot 

State's iillico 

Merchant 

Farmers' Union 

Capitalist 

Silk manufacluror 

Printers and publishers... 

Sjioculator 

Architect 

Refreshment saloon 

Wagon luiifr. and black- 
smith 

Plumber and gas fitter.... 

Fire Insurance Company 

Altorney-at-law 

Suarchur of records 

Altorncy-at-law 

Carpenter 

Farmer 

Wagon & carriage dealer 

Farmer 

Atlantic Hotel 

Livery, recd,&salos(able. 

Livery stable 

Parmer 



Maine 

New York 

Eslnbl'ed 1875 
England 

Michigan 

Germany... 

New York 

Massachusetts. 

Ohio 

Iowa 

Missouri 

Kentucky 

California 

Germany 

Me:(ieo 

Germany 

Indiana 



Ohio 

Indiana 

Njw Jersey.... 
England 

Massachuecils. 

Connecticut.... 

England 

California 

Kentucky 

Germany 



Kentucky 

England,. 



1801 
1849 
1868 
1854 
1869 
1861 
1850 
1856 



186U 



18.51 

1864 
1852 

1868 
1801 
1849 
1850 
1871 
1857 
1871 

1852 

1849 
1804 
1854 

1854 
1349 

1849 
1854 

1866 
1855 
ISGG 

iaiio 

1862 
1854 

1850 
1803 



Establ'ed 1871 

Now York 

StassaeliusetU. .... 

Missouri J1852 

Now York 1802 

1850 



1848 
1870 



Michigan. 

Ireland 

Missouri.,, 
England.,. 



1851 
1862 

1868 
1850 
1854 
1846 



1807 
1849 
1870 

lauo 

1869 
1871 



1800 



1804 
1870 

1808 
1861 
1871 
1652 
1871 
1804 
1871 

1862 
1874 



1869 
1850 

1651 

1802 

i'soe 

1855 
1806 

1868 
1868 
1873 

1850 
1869 



1870 
1873 
1851 
1852 
1653 
1808 
1850 
1868 
1847 



4,000 



377 



190 
T)79 



10 

65,000 



6 
476 



176 



678 

14 



106 



SlkXT JOSB CXX Y-Contin-ged. 



iin. 



Krnncdy, W. C 

Knnth, Wm 

Kvrr, J'lhn 

Kri'>x, Mm. H. L. „ 

Kflch, A.J....r. 

La Mollc, Mr«. B- 
Lciivenworih, M...- 
LflfniNc, Chiirlfcs ... 
hett-Mit, Thcc.dorc. 

Jjcnzen, Jacob 

J.cvy, Moyur 

X^-wi!i, Jiickson 

Ln|)U«i:1i, Julin 

LighUtun, F 

Lion, L 

Little, HoniL'f 

LoelijG.iindJ.jiCo. 

Luwi.-, Jiut. It 

Lowery, G. W 

Lowo, It 

Lki[ilun, Durnli 
Lux, Dviir 



UEUIUl 



BinUB> 



Knox Bioi'k Allornuy-al-luw 

South St IGardeiitT ■-■■■•-- 

22B Siivenlh St iCiirjienltr Hiid builder 

148 Stcniid St. CaplLnlilt 

Suiita Clura St Hnir drwfer 

S. Clara i S. Pedro Hotel and rcjlatirunt 

IGfi First St 

381 Market St 

Lcn/en Ave 

43B Vine St 



Crockery store 

Wine grower 

Architect 

,yu . .,.1. ^ Contractor and hiiildcr..,. 

300 & 308 First Si..j Dry goods 

Snnti. ClnruSl I Watch mokerand jeweler. 

!?a1oDn keeper 

Dejiuiy SherilT. 

Genl. mdse. & glove ninfr. 

Farmer 

Dry gondh..." City of Snn 

AllorncyA Notary Public 

Contraetor 

Farmer 



208 MiirketSl 

400 Seventh St 

2d& Ht. John Slfl... 

Snn JosC' 

263 Snnln Clam St.. 

St. Jume:^ St. 

Sun ,Io.'j5 

Almiidon St 

Cherry Av.' 

Central Murkcl 



Lux, Denry ■ Central Murk 

McCiiah, \V. D ILincnln Ave 

McDonnld, Geo. H. 5151 Tenlb St 



JIcKeo, Geo. U 

McKeii/.le.D 

McLelhin, JlrB. D... 

McLaui:;blin, H 

McMookin, Wm.-. 

McNully, Thoa 

Madden, Jiinics 

Mnddox.C. II 

Manning, L. D 



4U7t5Ccond St 

San Josi! 

Monterey Road...... 

McLuuglilin Ave... 
MonLitZincbiirSLi 

20] Firrft St 

KaccHt 

First St 

lal& St. John Sis.. 



Slj.rmolejo, M hi),') Siinlii Chira St.. 

Jlarlin, Ualvin Isifi Second Hi.., 

Mutrfiu, B. ]' list & St. John Sl3._ 

Mnson, N. H. A '50-1 Market St 

M'llly, A ICily Market 

Mediiwer.irt, Utx\fi aG7 Fifth St 



Minor, P. 

Mills, J. H. A 

Mix, GusUivu L 

Muuru, Lainc, Dul- 

nitii; & Loib 

Moody & Ilro 

Monroe, K. P 

Morion, C 

Mott, John 

MoQllric, J. A 

Moullon, S. A 

Murphy, B. D 



IGO Julian St 

Siinta Clani St 

San Frauciseo 

Simla Clara St 

Tiiird Si 

Otli & WoAhinglon.. 
240 Suntii Clam St.. 
ild&SanUCiaraSis 
Knox Block. 
Jackson St.. 
i'.28 Third St 



Murphy, Jas. T 

Murohy. Jolin M... 
Ncwluill, Sylvtoier. 

Noriega, E 

O'Donnell, Wm 



aiain &St.JebnSU; 
48a First St 

Lincoln Ave 

San Josfi 

William & '.Hh SL=.. 



Owen, J. J Second St 

Owens, J. H Santa Olarii St 

OwcuB, W.H I " 

Oiiklev, L F First St 



iimin. 



euae aat rOST-OrnCI, 



Parklmr.'il, W A... 

Patterson, J. SI 

PiiynOiD. S 

Poirano, G 

Porbam, D. 1! 

Pflslcr, A 

Pialli, C 

Picisuncckrr, H 

Piopor, J, H 

Pigoll, It 

Pinard,J.B 

Polbomus, C. B 



C0:( Second St 

Almadoh St 

06 Santa Clara St... 
S.AiigiiFitin&Mark't 

r.21 Fir-slSt 

SonliL Clara St 

First St 

320 Snnla Clara St.. 
Stockton AAlanieda 

230 Eighth St 

San Salvador SI 

Stuckt'n&PoIhornui' 



Butcher 

Fruit grower 

Uutclicr 

Puinti, oils, glaasj etc 

Foundry & maehine shop 

Munagor Com. Suv. Bank 

Muaiciun 

Livery stnblea 

Parmer 

Capitalist 

Wiigon maker & earpon ter 

Stock raiser 

Capitalist..... 

Salesman 

CoUlo raiser 

Pork packer 

Uress maker 

A ttorncy-ftt-hiw 

Livery and feed stables.... 
Scurefier of records 

Atlorneys-ut-lnw 

Flouring mill 

Calciminor 

Music Elore 

Blacksmith 

Atlorncy-Hl-law 

Stock and money broker.. 
Attorney-at-law,& Mayor 

of Sui'i J'os6 

Banker 

Merchant 

Nurseryman 

Druggist 

Zoological garden 

Printer and [Uiblisher 

General merchandiac 

Clothing & nierehl. tailor 
Itcal estnto nnd ins, agl... 

Farmer 

Altorncy-at-law 

Groceries 

Butcher 

Merchant 

Farmer and fruit grower. 
Apotliecory nnd druggist. 
City Sur.& Civil Engineer 

Carpenter 

Farmer 



Pennsylvania- 
Bavaria 

pjngland 

Virginia 

Germony- 

France^ 

Connecticut.... 

France 

Prussia. 

Germony 

MHS!nchu>ctt5. 

Austria 

Germany 

France 

New York 

Jose Store,"... 
Mitssachusctta. 
Pennsylvania.. 

New York 

Illinois 

France 

Ohio 

Canada 

New York 

Scotland 



iLtl 

idtt. 



18ol Sao Joae 

I8r.i. •• 



Pennsylvania.. 

England 

IreTund 

Arkansas 

Kentucky 

Miiine 

Mexico 

Now York 

Michigan 

Tennessee 

France 

England 

Virginia 

Missouri 

Bis. Columbia, 

EalabPcd 1878 

California 

Florida 

Michigan 

Ohio 

Missouri 

Maine. 

Canada 

Culifornia 

Canada 

MnssiichuscCts. 

Culifornia 

Ireland 

New York 



Ohio 

A'ermont 

Massachusetts 

New York 

Italy 

Termont 

France 

Ilftly 

Germany 

Canada 

New Jersey.... 



1853 



I8r>2 
18(10 
1848 
1851 
1875 
1850 

1860 



1871 
1 808 
I8G0 

isrjii 

184!) 
1840 
1871 
1852 



18S8 

181)11 18«9 
1857 1857 
1854 
1849 
1867 



1802 
1800 



18'M 1844 



1814 
1350 

1802 

1875 
I860 
1870 

isiio 

18(18 
1870 

i860 



1844 

18&7 



S. Francisco. 
Sun 3os6. 



75 
800 



10 



75 



GO 



•1,400 



Oakland. 
413 Third St. 



Knos Block. 



Santii Clara St 

Lincoln Ave 

478 Guadalupe St,.. 
8tb & at. John SU.. 



Pomroy,C. W ,457 Seventh St 

Portal, J. B.J SanU Clara St 

Putts, J. S iFirst St 

Power, E jCenlcrSt.nr. Julien 

Prioo, John B iFirstSl 

Patnoy.C. U 435 First Si 

Qucvcda, A. G !lst and William Sis 

Bnnkin, Wm. B '2aU Santa Clara St. 

Roberts, R 1312 First St 

Rouse, J ;559 Fifth St 

Ruckcr, J. E Com.Bank Building 

Putnam, S. N 

Sun Jose Gas Co — 
San Jose Library 

Association 

San Jose Savings 

Bank 

Sainsovain, P 

Saisset, Pedro Da... 

Saph, A. J 

Santa Clara Vulluy 

Railroad Comn'y. 
Saullrignon, F, T... 
Sauffrignon, F. J..- 

Savidan, J 

Sftxe, F. J 

Scott, J. S 

Schoen & Weil 

Schneider, D 

Sccboch, Henry 

Sellnuin, A 

Shipper, Sol 

Shively, "Wm. B 

Smith, Sampson 

Smith, China 

Spencer & Covel 

Spencer, Francis E. 

Spring, T. W 

Splivttto, Slef 

Stern, M 

Stevens, J. B 

Stocklin, John B... 

Stockton, N. H 

Siowe, J, J 

Swiegert, Jonathan 
Strobel, A 



itrsntss. 



Bitmit. 



New York 

Franco- 

Missouri 

Ireland 



See'y of Bank of San Jose 
Real Citato and ins. agt... 

Physician 

JIarbIc and wood worker. 

Furniture dealer ,New Joraey.... 

Medical emporium and 

veterinary surgeon jNew York 

Groceries and liquors .Spain 

Indiana 

Wisconsin 

('onnectieut.... 

Missouri 



Stock raiser and ins. agt.. 

Supt. Water L'o 

Bookkeeper and clerk. 

Itenl esiato agent 

Altorney-at-law 

Gii3 works 



Santa Clara St 

Marlicr St 

212 Santa Clara St.. 
Ciiurt-Housc. 

Alameda 

285 Shinlii Clara St.. 

300 Second St 

272 Market Si 

438 Third St 

280 First St... 

421 First St 

Sfln Pedro St 

Tenth St 

268 Santa Clara St.. 
Bnk of S.Jose Bidg. 
Market &Sun, Clara 

St. Helena St 

Santa Clara St 

193 Mont. St 

248 Firat St.. 

210 Tenth St 

6th & St. James Sis 
1.5th & Julian Sis... 
Alameda 



49 



270 



Sullivan, JI. R 

Tevlin, John 

Thadewald, C 

The Bunk of San 

Jose 

Thome, Walter S... 

Tomar, Servais 

Tuck, J. H. L 

Venal, D. C 

Vinnodge.J.D &Co 
Vinsonhalcr, James 

Vioget, W. H 

Ward & Newhy 

Wale, Edward 

Wendt, G 

Weston, Geo. M 

Williamson, W. M. 
Wilson & Carlson... 

Whipple, L. A 

While, Chas. E 

Wilcox, Chas. F.... 

Wilcox, Harvey 

Welden, W.H 

Zieglor, W 

Zingg, C. E 



San la Clara St 

First St 

Suuol St 



Library 

Banking 

Wine and hop grower- 
Real estate agent 

Conlraclor and builder,, 



I8G4 
1840 



1860 
1 861 



18411 
1864 



France 



Michigan- 



Franco.. 



Vermont 



(*Ce. 



18G3 



1830 
1840 
1856 



1864 
1870 
1875 
1870 
1849 

1850 
1851 
1865 
1851 
1864 
1862 
1803 
1800 

1872 

1868 
1844 

1840 
1850 



Mst-omci 



J 0^0. 



240Montg.St 
Sun Joae.. 



Established 1875 

Orchardist 

Fruit grower & maehiniat 
Veterinary surgeon- 
County Clark — 

Agricultural implements.iNew Jersey. 

Tobaceonistfl IBavaria 

Saloon keeper Prussia 

I' .Bavaria 

Under Sheriff. Germany 

Merchant tailor .Ru-=sni Poland. 

Dry goods [New York 

Prop. U. S. Hotel 

Hortieullurist Maine 

Renl eat4ilc agenls 

Atlorney-at-hiw 

General morchandiso 

Wine grower 

Harness maker& saddler. 

Agent 

Carpenter 

Wine grower 

Livery and feed stubles... Michigan 

Orchard and nursery ■Illinois 

Engineer Fredericksburg. 

Brewery Germany 

Groceries and liquors Canada 

Saloon keeper 

Carriage maker 



1865 
I860 



1866 
1863 
1860 
1862,1852 



Ist&SanluCIuroSU 
8d & St. John Sts... 
S. Carlos & Marlior. 
S. Fernando & llth 

Twelfth St 

Knox Block 

First St 

Ruco Track 

Santa Clara St 

First St. 

Market & St. John. 

LcnKen Ave 

347 Siilh St 

San Fernando & 2d 

Santo Clara St 

391 St. James St 

First St 

Alameda 

405 Seventh St 

294 First St 



New York 

Italy 

Germany 

N. Hampshire. 
Switzerland.... 
Tennessee 



Ireland 

Prussia 



Banking 

Physician 

Rustic manufacturer 

Geologist 

Orchardist 

Beul estalo ugenls 

Business college 

Horse trainer 

Dealers in coal, lime, elc. 
Wagon & carriage mnlr- 

Butcher 

Merchant 

Justici! of the Peace 

Props. Central Hotel 

Wines and liquors 

Attorney-at-law 

Attorney & Notary Public 

Speculator 

Real estate 

Dealer in boots nnd shoes. 



First .St iGunsmith 



1860 
1868 
1865 

1801 
1850 
1872 
1874 
1862 
18-50 



1850 
1840 
1852 
1857 
1860 
1850 
1872 
1852 

1860 
1851 
1859 
1802 



New York 

Luxembourg... 
N. Hampshire. 
N. Carolina.... 

California 

Louisiana 

California 



1800 
1868 
1874 
1808 
1850 
1872 
1874 
1860 
1860 
1875 
1852 
1801 
1854 
1852 
1864 
1860 
1860 
1872 
1800 

1875 
1852 
1859 
1871 



1805 



Snnta Clara.. 
San Josf- 



10 
S. F.] 



106 
13,300 



117 



Canada 

Germany 

Maine 

Ohio 

Sweden 

Rhode Island- 
Missouri 

Illinois 

N. Brunswick. 
Germany 

Missouri 



1866 
1858 
1805 
1849 
1849'1850 
1875 

180511880 
1876 
187411874 
1807 1807 
1800 I 1860 
1872[l873 



1856 
1809 
1875 
1846 



1853 

1869 

1868 

1840 

1856 

I850'1875 

1869,1859 

1859|l859 

1870'1870 



35 



Kora County. 



f Alumcda County. 



£%ss<V7'oos <FO'wxrs^:£^. 



Bninler, Mrs. Uelilo. Redwood 
Bla(;on, J r., Otis..., ISuratoga 

Benrdtley, J B " ' 

Benson, Jamea 

BIytho, S. A 

Ohaloner, H. A 

Chase, J. W 



Redwood 



Lexington 



Olevonger, W. T.... 
Daves, John E... 
Euslin, Sarah C. 
EUedge, Wm. T. 

Evans, E. H 

Fnnchor, Gilbert.... 

Farwell, Jtmnie M. 
Fox, Jeromu U 
Goldawurthy, John. 
Haines, Simeon 
Hannihan, Edward 

Hiirlman, J- 

Huun, John T 

Hebard, Lewis 

Hickoy, John 

Hooker, Wm 

Huni, E. M 

Hutchinson, J. C... 
Hutchinson, S. P... 
Hutlon, A Henry,. 

Ingrcm, T J 

Jones, J amis T 

Kamp, B. & U 

King, W.T 

Kerr, William C... 
Laird, Mrs. A. E... 

Langford. S. H 

Log3t.J,W.&A.T. 

Lovtil, I. J 

Lovell, J-A 



Saratoga. 



BDSIIiESS. 



BimiiT. 



Whtn Wtin 

CITDB CUD! 

USUtt ti Co. 



Lexington . 
Redwood.... 



Farmer Illinois 

Livery stable Maine.- 

Generol merchandise New York 

Plasterer I Ireland 

Grain dealer ;Tenne5S00 

Lumber dealer Maine 

Lumber dealer, faruior it, 
merchant " 

Merchant [Missouri 

Farmer | Illinois 

Hotel k|ir.(Central Hotel |1 " 

Blacksmith jKentUcky .. 

Froil grower New York. 

i'ioneor almond planta- 
tion I " 

Fiirmcr " 



Saratoira 



Redwood 



Saratiiga... 
Lob Galo^- 
Kedwnud... 



II England 

Hotel kccjicr N. Hampshire 

Farmer Ireland 

Bunts and ahocs Virginia 

Miller Missouri 

Farmer and fruit growt^r. New York 

'1 Ireland 

Lumber dealer 

Farmer and carpenter 



" and fruit grower. 

Merchant 

Inarming 



Paper manufacturer- 
Farmer 

Hotel keeper 



Blackamilhs. 
Parmer 



England 

Khiine 

Georgia 



Texaa 

New York... 
Germany..... 
Nl-w York.. 

Ireland 

Iowa 



Canada 

Kentucky . 



1875 
1867 
1859 
1852 
18411 
1868 

18511 
1852 
1852 
1849 
1863 
1840 

1850 
1852 
1852 
1852 
1859 
184!) 
1862 
1846 
1850 
18.52 
184!) 
18-5! 
1852 
186-J 
1849 
1852 
1876 
1849 
1365 
1860 
1853 
1853 
1868 
1852 
1852 



1875 
1857 
1871 
1852 
1840 
1868 



1859 
1852 
1852 



Saratoga. 



lo, of 

JlCTB. 



Los Qatos.. 
San Jose... 
Alma 



Saratoga.. 

Los Galos 

1840 Saratoga 

1853 Alma 
1853 



1802 
1850 
1867 
1852 
1802 
1851 
1853 
1840 
1852 
1S531 
1859' 
1865 
1852 
1853 
18?0 
1853 
1876 
1840 
1806 
1809 
185S 
I85S 
1868 
1852 
1862 



Los Gates-.,. 

Saratoga 

Sun Jose 

Los Gatos.... 

Saratoga 

San la Clara. 
Saratoga 



Alma 

Saratoga 

Los Gutos.... 
Saratoga 



KIHK 



Santa Clara. 
Saratoga 



Los Galos- 

Saratoga... 
Lus Giitos.. 
Saraloga... 
San Joae.... 



147 



750 



200 
240 
500, 

2bl'kB 



40 

160 
160 
130 

160 



141 
1601 
85 
213' 
1061 
2171 

40, 

100 

„s 

16 

185 
218 



Lyndon, J. H 

Lyndon, J. W 

McCall,A 

MeWiliiams, Jas.,. 
Mcsj^ersmith, John. 
Miller, ilm. S. J... 

Mills, L, R 

Misenlieimer, M. A. 

Moullrio, "W. B 

Mowbray, Rubt. H 

Nordgrcen, S 

Padduek.S, A 

Parker, Robert 

Parr, E, N 

Parr, W.J 

Putzer, Joseph 

Quimby, Myra E... 
Itoynolds, Thos. V 

Rogers, W. H 

Sage, Lewis A 

Scully, Thos 

Sciinor, Geo.,. 

Songravcs, Milton. - 

Shirlev.W, M 

Simpson, W. Jeff,., 
SomoTvillo, Alex.... 
Somerville, Jr., Jas, 
Smith, J. & Teresa- 
Thompson, Thos.... 

Tie.'iler, Robert 

Timm, Geo 

Van Dine, E 

Van Nc<ii, Samuel,. 

Walker, Kobert 

Wollace, L 

Whipple, F. E 

Whipple, Val, M... 

Whipple, J. M 

Wilson, S.G 



Los Gatos... 

Redwood.... 
Saratoga.... 
Redwood..,. 

Saratoga.... 
Los GaliM... 
Redwood,.,, 
Lexington , 
Red wood.... 

Los Gatos-. 
Redwood.-, 

Los Galos,.. 
Redwood.,.. 
Saratoga,,.. 
Los Galos- 
Redwood... 



Merchant , 



Farmer nnd contractor... 

Blackamitb 

Farmer 

PociBo Scl tiler Springs.... 

Carpenter 

Farmer 

Carpenter,... 

Farmer 

Hotel keeper 

ViniculiuriBt 

Farmer 



Los Gates.. 
Redwood... 



Saratoga... 
Los Galos., 



Teacher 

Sail maker 

Miller 

Hotel keeper 

Farmer 

Blacksmith ! England 



Vermont.. 



Now York 

Scotland 

Indiana 

Ohio 

New York 

N. Carolina..,. 

California 

New York 

Sweden 

Ohio 

Ireland 

California 

Iowa 

Hungary 

Cjilifornia 

Ireland 

New York 



Ireland. 



Via 



1808 
1850 
1856 
1850 
1S7U 
1860 
1840 
1853 

1873 
185G 
1809 
1850 



1648 
1867 



1853 
1872 
1849 
I8G:1 



tdCo. 

1868 
1859 
1858 
1864 
187(1 
1870 
I860 
1866 

1875 
1857 
1850 
1860 



Los Gntos- 



lets. 



Saratoga , 



1840 
1800 



1866 



1863 
1803 



Snnta Clam-' 

Saratoga 

Sun la Clara- 1 

Alma 

Saratoga i 

LosGotOB-...! 

Saratoga I 

Alma I 

Saratoga ; 

San J056 



Farmer 

Saloon keeper 

Teamster 

Farmer 

Paper manufacturer 

Summer resort 

Farmer 



Masenchn sells, 

California 

Missouri 

Scotland 

Now York 

C'onncelicut.,.. 

Norway 

Gornmny 



1840 1856 
1854! 1804 



Maino 

Now Jersey.... 
Canada. 



Carpontor 

Farmer 

Fruit raiser 

Farmer 

Dealer in feed and wood-JNow York 
Saloon keeper Wisconsin.. 

Iowa 

Now York. 

Indiana,.-.. 



1652 
1850 
1868 
1850 



1852 
1868 
1868 
1858 



Mount. View 

San Josi 

S, Francisco- 
Los Gntos 

Santa Clara., 

Los Galos 

Saratoga 

Los Gatos 

Siinta Clara- 
I Sara toga 



lS70il870 
1861 ! 1867 
1S62J1S75 
Hr.4 18r,S 
IM'.i IS."i.'. 
I^ti.-. I8<iii 



General merchandise. 

Mercliunt 

Wagon maker 



ISOI 
1864 
1801 
1862 
1874 



Santa Clara. 

Saratoga 

Los Gatos-,. 
Snnta Clara. 

Saratoga 

Los Galo*"., 
Saralogn 



isoa 

1864 
1803 
1864 
1874 'Los Gatos 



400 
122 

1 
292 
200 
170 
IGH 



120 

3 

48 

444 

423 
164 

16 
45 

760 

500 

7 

SO 



60 

160 

120 
100 

m 
iiio 

376 
320 



107 



SAXor jrosE xovtwshii*. 



AblM.W. 

Andrew*, T 

Andorsiin tc Ivury.. 

Uubb, C. E 

Iliillou, J.Q. A 

UiikiT, O. L 

Uiiii?»i Flniiry 

Bnxler, J. G 

»inr, fi. P 

Itotu'dict, Jr., E. C. 

Itii^hniiU, laaaa 

llliiku, Thonian 

ItluomUuld, Guorgo. 

BonrdiDKn, A 

Duhm, Fronz,.,. 

Borcher-i, B, W 

Bell, U 

Bornal, Liuh 

Bigg., A. U 

Bluinc, G. K 

Blnko, Thomuii 

Drnnlmin, leaiic 

RriUon, M 

Bowers, M. S 

BrH/oll, H. A 

Ciiin,Gilbort 

Onstle, Isniic 

Cft-'lro, Agflton 

Chew, Alfred 

Orilos, Wm 

Cross, Geo .... 

CiiliaUn, 51. M 

Cumpbcll, J. A 

Ciinnoy, Jiiinus 

Clark, S.S 

Cobb,S 

Colby, James T 

Colombol, Jue F.... 
Corntlnvoit, J. H... 
CotllB, Honrv W... 

Cottlo, Mnrtiul 

CoMcns, "Wm. W.. 

Di;im, J.H 

Dins, Frank 

■Doliorty, P 

Doly.H 

Doni,H. E 

Downur, Q. H 

Dixon, Isuoc 

Edwnrda, H. W 

Edward?, W. A. Z,. 

Evans, J. L 

Fiirnsworlti, 0. W.. 

Fnrney, Mark 

Furrcn, B. J 

Fioldsled, C 

Fowlor, A. J 

Fox, Bernard S 

Fryer, George 

FoolQ, Mrs £. A... 
Foxworlby, Alex... 
Friisor, Thonius E., 

FHlmer^A 

Galbrnith, .Fas. E... 

Garcidoi Hugh 

Gaull, Thomas 

Gcndtir, Edward M. 

Goigcr, Wm. C 

Ooi^sniun, Ciispcr... 

Greenfield, Milo 

GrccnowulL, David. 
Gish, Dtivid Ellison 
Godfrey, Edward... 

Golds, H. W 

Guerriii',, J, D 

Hiiniillon, J. W 

HamiUon, Luther... 

Hurt, H 

Hnrtnian, Chiis. H,. 
Hussler, Gottlieb.,.. 

Husslcr, John 

Hayes, Tboinas 

Hollvor.G. W 

Hcnsill, G. W. 

Herman, Adam 

Hcrvev, H. M 

llcss, A. M 

Hubson, David 

U..I,5on, T. M 

Hob5on,G. W 

Holland, Joseph E. 
Holland, Simeon.... 
Hoatcttcr, Geo. K... 

Howard, John 

Ingamulls, Geo 

Jaekson, J. B 

Jordan, Reiison 

Jordan, C. W 

Kul7., Alex 

King, Joseph R 

Keasl, Wm 

Kce*lii.g,T. B 

Kennedy, W. W... 

Kirk, T. 

Klce, John 

Knapji, Samuel 

Ladd, E 

Ludd, Morris 



San JoaC 



Farmer.... 

Wngon makers 

Farmer and editor 

Pruil grower 

Furmcr 

Hop grower 

Farmer 



IITITITT. 






Fruit grower 

Farmer 

II 

OrohardiBt 

Farmer 

Frnit raiser 

Farmer 

" and fruitgrower. 



Fruit grower 

11 

Farmer 



Fruit grower 

Farmer 



Saloon keeper 

Farmer 

" and fruitgrower. 

Fruit grower 

Farmer 



Orcliardist 

Alum Rock, Park House. 
Farmer 

Nurseryman 

Farmer 

Fruitgrower 

Parmer 

Agent for Jas. Lick , 

Farmer 



Orchurdist 

Farnierand gardener.... 

Fruit raiser 

Farmer 

" and Etock raiser. 



Oliio 

New York 

Establ'ed 18(l(i 
Pennsylvania.. 

Vermont 

New York^.... 

Minneaottr 

Miis«uchu5ults. 
New York 

Cannda.. 

Now Yurlt 

New Jersey.... 

New York. 

Germany 

Mii^sDuri.. 

Californin 

Tennesfce 

Now York 

Kentucky .... 

New York 

Virginia 

Kentucky 

Now Y'ork 

Mexico 

Ohio 

Pennsylvania.. 

Now York 

Mussaehusotls. 

N. Carolina 

Missouri 

New York 

England 

Mnssochiisctt^. 

California 

Maryland 

Missouri 



1801' 1802 
I860 1652 



1873 

18Q8 
185'J 
180!) 
16413 
1864 
1871 
1852 
1850 
1858 
1873 
1870 
18r,ti 
1851 



San Jose 



1873 

1856 
18ti2 

1873 
1874 
180-1 
1873 
1859 
1853 
1868 
1878 
1870 
1871 
1854 



Evergreen ... 
San Juti 



' and stock raiser... 

Orcbardisl 

Retired 

Farmer and fruit grower 

Stock raiser 

Farmer 



N. Bampshirc. 

Kentucky 

Portugal 

Iruland 

New York 

Illiuoin 

Pennsylvania.. 

Canada 

Illinois 

jEngland 

illlinois 

.Missouri 

Ireland.. 

'.New York 

jNorway 

.Missouri 

Ireland 

England. 

Ohio 

Kentucky 

Nova Scotia.... 

Maryland 

Missouri 

England 

Obio 

New York 

Illinois 

{Switzerland .. 

New York 

Pennsylvania.. 

Indiana 

Pennsylvania.. 

Prusaia 

Switzerland.. 

Now York 

Californin 

Massachusetts. 

Holland 

Germany 

England - 

Ohio 

Virginia 

Germany 

New York 

Indiana 

N. Carolina.... 



1849 
1804 
1850 
184G 
1801 
1849 
1873 
1852 
1857 
1858 
1853 
18&0 
1840 
1852 
18&0 
1873 
18Si 
1841) 
1858 
1857 
1851 
185J 
1854 
1850 
1802 
1870 
1858 
1851 
1872 
1849 



1840 
1808 
1855 
1840 
1803 
1875 
1873 
1852 
1873 
1853 
1863. Evergreen ... 



1871 
l8ie 
1852 
1808 
1873 
18CI) 
1852 
1871 



San JoBii ' 



1851 
1854 
1864 
1873 
I80C 
1872 
1858 
18<i8 
1872 
1851 



Evergreen ... 
San Jose 



Pioneer 

Sun JoEC 



1849 1850 

1850 1852 
1803 1857 
1872 1872 
1850 1853 
1863 1860 
1800 1373 
1840'!8C3 
1852 1852 Evergreen ... 



" and stock raiser. . 

" and carpenter 

" & line stock raiser. 

Sycamore Exchange 

Farmer and fruitgrower. 

Fruit grower 

Teacher 

Farmer 



1852 
1801 
1874 
1875 
1807 
1853 
1852 
18^0 
18U4 
1851 
1803 
1853 
1673 



1862 
1801 
1874 
1875 
1873 
1809 
1852 
1850 
1804 
1872 
1855 
1800 
1873 
!fi,-|0'l8.'jO 
1849,1850 
1868 1858 
180Illl875 
I653:i853 
186211852 

|1850 

185711857 
1807! 1607 
1861 1864 
1852 1 1852 
1857il857 
1850 1863 
18501854 
1807*1807 
1849:1852 
1840 1 1850 
IS501651 



Ran Jose 

Evergreen ... 
San Jos6 



San In Clara.. 
Sim Jose 



and dairyman 

and fruitgrower.. 



England 

Missouri 

Pennsylvania.. 

England 

Ohio 

Virginia 

N. Carolina,... 

Germany 

Californin - 

England 

Ohio 

Canada 

Ohio 

Germany 

Ohio 

Now York 



Evergreen .. 



Sau Josfi 



IIMK. 



180O 
1872 
1857 
185!) 
1654 
1650 
1874 
1850 
1849 
1800 
1864 
1864 
1809 
1870 
1862 
1853 
1850 
1850 
1853 
1609 



18GII 
1872 
1857 
1850 
1654 
1650 
1674 
1872 
1850 
ISGOj 
1870! 
1854; 
I870l 
1873 
1855 
1853 
1808 
1850 
1863 
1871 



Berj'cssn 

San JosiS 



Ill Luke, Cliaric! Sun Josf 

401 Locke it Munlngue.jSan Francisco.. 

Lalicy, l)L*nniH Sun Joju 

360 LiBt-m, John F " 

195 I Leenian, F. C " 

122 Leigbtnn, J. A " 

70 Logan, A. P " 

75 Lundy, D. S " 

Lundy, R. " 

McAbbce, Alex " 

134 McAbbce, Edward.. " 

(ja3 ! Maybury, Frank H. " 

1(10 McCurlev, Jas. R... " 

7 McCarloy.Sauil. W " 

275 McClay, H. S " 

13 Mi-Kiernan, F I " 

240 Madden, John i " 

(SO Madden, M , " 

383 Martin, P I " 

5 Mnlech, T. A " 

038 Manill, J. C " 

284 Murjiliv,Sr., Jas..,. " 

ISJ Nonbe'rn, W. L.... " 

3 O'Brien, Jerry " 

06 Ogan, A. M " 

125 Ogan, J. M " 

10 Ogiur, A. M " 

557 Ogier, James U " 

100 Oliver, Warner " 

108 Overfelt, Wm. C... " 

13 Patterson, H. P " 

650 Powell, John " 

6 Powell, Moses " 

5 Pruseh, William..-. " 

25 Pyle, John F " 

119 Pyle, Wm. H " 

5 Quinn, William '' 

022 Rico, H.N " 

87 Ricliardsun, Garaos. " 

670 Itidley, J " 

095 Rinoliart, Win " 

22 Rouse, Timothy " 

liobert^, John " 

Rogers, W. B " 

180 Koss, John E " 

Robertson, John.... " 

10 Rock, John " 

105 Itucker, Ambrose... " 

400 Ruiherford, G. W.. " 

160 Sandoi-son, L. F 

04 Schappi, Louis 

12 Schmidt, 0. S 

712 Selbv, John S 

44 Sonler, W- A 

Shaw, Isaiah 

83 Shore, Wm. 

191 Sherwood, E 

126 Schallenberger, M.. 

222 Singleton, James.... 

6 Smith, Cliurles C... 

80 Smith, E. O 

Smilli, Bradley 

14 Smith, Frederick... 

100 Smith, P. J.... 

100 Smout, George 

HI Snow, James 

42 SneIl,T. E 

14 Snyder, Jacob 

37 Speckens, Mrs. L... 
8 Spencer, U. A 

219 Spilzer, L, A 

50 Sprung, Fredrick... 

05 Stevens, Charles 

100 Stevens, U. E 

1,800 Stevens, U. L 

470 Story, A. N 

20 Stocliton, S. P 

135 Stringfcllow, W. A. 

148 Sullivan, M. R 

ICO Sullivan, Pnlrick... 
002 Syer, Robert 

93 Tarloton, G. W 

200 Thayer, B. B 

38 Thomas, C.G 

400 Townsend, J. U. M, 

10 Tillotson, Harlan... 

Trimble, ilohn 

174 Troedson, Swon 

!)7 Tully, John 

208 Tonnant, John 

209 Tomlinson, H 

150 Tompkins, John 

48 Umbarger, A, F.... 

140 Umbarger, David... 

Vennimo, 0. H. P.. 

26 Vansycklo, H 

81 Wallers, Hrnrv 

Ward, W. E 

10" Ware, William H.. 

Weathers, John 

Wells, O.C 

20 Williams, LoringS. 

Winalow, Wm 

406 Wetzell. Herman... 

160 While, J. D 

Wiliard, G. W. ...... 

178 Younger, Coloman. 
Zimmer, L 



Farmer 

Hardware 

Farmer 

' imd fruitgrower. 
Orcbardist 



Farmer 

" and stock raiser,,. 

Horse trader 

Fanner and trainer 



" and stock raiser... 



and stock rniser... 



" nnd dairyman 

Fruit grower 

Farmer 



New Jer.'ey.... 
New York - .. 

Ireland 

Ohio 

Mainn 

N- Hampshire 

Mi-sonn.. 

Virginia 

N. Carolina.... 

Cuniida 

Indiana 

Kentucky 

Missouri 

Ireland 

Massachusetts. 
Ireliind 



Wlw3 Via 
teSuu UOa, 

1852;i852Sun JosiS 

18521 S, Francisco. 

1853!l856Sau Jos6 

1852 1808 



1874 

1858 
1802 
1658 
1851) 
1863 
1804 
1800 



1874 
1604 

1832 
1863 
1859 
1803 
1804 
1800 



Evergreen... 
San Jus6 



1802' 1802 
1 802 1 1802 
1853 1863 
1864 1850 
165-1 1R5G 
1850; 10G2 

l863'1653{BuTnett 

186011854 San Joad...... 



and frnit grower... 
and joiner 



nnd stock rniser.. 



I' and dairyman 

Orchnrdist 

Farmer 



Goriiiiiny 

N. Hanip.'bire. 

Ireland 1844|l845 

N. Carolina.,.. 1860 1800 

Ireland 1869'1808 

Missouri I852|l852 

11852 1852 

Maryland |l800ll86O 

" '.185111851 

Ohio |1850;1870 

Virginia 1849 1852 

Ahibamu 11801,1801 

Georgia |l849!l873 

SIiEaia.-ippi 1 1849 1875 

Germiiny 1 1808 1808 Evergreen... 

.Missouri 1840 ISyiiiSan Joje 

Illinois :1840ll850 

Ireland '1853il858 

Vermont |18.'i;sjl809 

England I8'.4l!864 



Evergreen ... 
San Jose 



Evergreen .. 
San Jos(5 



Illinois |IS68 

I'ennsylvanin..' 1863 



New York 

Wales 

Ohio 



Nurseryman 

Farmer . 

Ciipitalist 

Nursery nnd llorist..... 

Groceries nnd litjuor 

Farmer 

•I and carpenter 

' nnd Block raiser... 

Frnit grower and hotel 
Farmer [keeper. 

'■ and blacksmith ... 

CapitiiliBt 

Fruitgrower 

Farmer 

Postma-sier & merchant... 
Farmer - 



Vinicullurist 

Farmer 



Slent mnrkel 

Farmer 



and Block raiser... 



1874 
1849 
1802 
1850 
1807 
1803 
18411 
1854 
1849 



Scotland 

Germany 

Virgiiiiii 

New York 

Ma=fucbu^etls. 
.^wiizorhind ...|I801 

Germany '1848 

.Missouri J1853 

Maine 1850 

Now York 1 1852 

N. Carolinn.... 1849 

New York 

Ohio 

Kentucky 

Germany 

Maryland 

Maine 

Germany 



ijhmd 

Cimm'elicul 

Massachusetts. 

Germany 

Tennessee 

Illinois 

Virginia 

Prussia 

Vermont 

Prussia 

Ohio 

Alabama 

Californin 

Canada 



1849 
1844 
1849 
1869 
1871 
1869 
1848 
1807 
1852 
1871 
1861 
1804 
1852 
1852 
1858 
1804 
1850 
1849 
1867 
1850 
1852 



Groceries nnd liiuor Canada 1851 

Farmer j Ireland 1851 

Fruit grower |Mnrybind 1878 

Orchardist - iN. Hampshire. 1862 

Superintendent of mine.... Massiichusotls. 1852 

Fruit erower Ponnsvtvnnin,. 1851 

ICalifornia 11848 

Farmer Ohio 1652 

and stock rniser, ., 



1808 

1800 

1874 

1849 

1862 

1853 

1807 

1803 

1865 

1872 

1852 

1870 

1876 

1853 

1853 

1853 

1853 

1873 

18,J0 

1853 

1800 

1871 

1809 

18.yi 

1307 

1853 

1871 

1854 

1804 

1852 

1852 

180O 

1870 

1870 

1854 

18-'i7 

1850 

1800 



Misiiouri 

Sweden 

Ircliind 



Orchardist 

Farmer 



" and stock raiacr,,. 

Fruit grower 

Farmer 

Fruit grower 

Farmer 



1849 

1871 
1649 
1853 
iM a-siiehuselts. 1853 

Ireland 1 1850 

West Virginia ISOO 

Virginia ...,;18d0 

Ohio 11831 

New York |1850 

Germany 1600 

Missouri 1873 

Now Jersey.. ..!l849 



Evergreen ... 
San Josii 



Evergreen .. 
San Jo.=e 



Evergreen . 
San Josi'...- 



Evergri'eii,. 
San Joci;,... 



Tennessee 

Illinois 

New York 

Maine 

Poland 

Vermont 

Elaine 



Orchardist 

Farmer & breeder "f short Missouri 
Blacksmith [horns.] Germany 



1867 
1855 
1604 
1853 
1850 
1868 
1859 
1651 
1669 



1852 
1851 
1873 
18.'.2 
1874 
1852 
1850 
1808 
1649 
1871 
1652 
1853 
1854 
1853 
1800 
18-53 
1853 
1870 
1803 
1873 
1852 
1867 
1800 
1604 
1858 
1859 
1868 
1859 
1861 
1600 



120 



272 
400 

10 

03 

143 

200 

190 

SOU 

20 

627 

548 

127 

IGO 

10,000 

40 

42 

50 

184 

20 

280 

81 

80 

9} 

100 

65 

100 

72 

00 

333 

243 

62 



40 

109 

538 

378 

190 

100 



47 
13 

20 

14 

030 

352 

80 

9 

116 

300 

222 

250 

10 

50 

3 

714 



75 
140 

20 

12 



400 
88 

393 
79 



296 
105 

39 

80 
300 

87 

630 

277 

1,209 

900 

12 
337 

80 
137 
149 

20 

C4 

6 

040 

100 

1,250 

75 

66 

06 

190 



211 

12 



108 



t^AlXTA GX»ARA TO-WTBTSXIII*- 



Akiu-'W, a Sunltt CUrn 

Alexander, h. P.... " 

Ar^uullii,J. B " 

Argi'iello, LnuiB A.. " 

Ar'|uc», J. R I " 

Appcrson, It. W,...| " 

UaiV'y, A. M- I " 

Ball, Ptter " 

BoWUigiT, C " 

BiiHConi, L. H I " 

lienncll, 'Winston.- 

HerL'in, D 

]lilling«,J. M 

HilllngB. J. R 

U.>.ine, W. D 

Briytcr, Tliomo* 

Rriiukctt, C. T 

Briiity.J. B 

Brown, «. M 

Byron, Qcwrgo 

BrimbiccniTi, P. A.. 
Cninpboll, BcnJii'D.. 

Cantor, Gcurgc 

Chiipmun, E. M 

ChuBC, Lmvis M 

Choni'v, J 

Cnllin.D. W 

Connor, J. S 

Cook, F. B 

Cnolj, NutliiinicI 

Cort'onin, Martin... 

Cole, J. H Jackson & Liberty. 

Corey, J. M Sonlii Clarn 

Crnndnll, J. B 



Former . 



Speculator 

Farmer 



Dry goods morchunl.. 

P. M. and varlely store... 
Parmer 



Carriage paint«r 

Farmer and olorgymnn. 

Fruit g^rower 

Farmer ...- 

Markctman 

Farmer 



Fruit grower — 

Farmer 



Cuyno, Mii'liiicl 

Davis, (J. C 

Duvica, E. H 

Dibble,.), n 

Oini.'giui, J. H 

Donnvan, li. B 

Doylo, P. H 

Jjlostin, Jamts "W... 
Ebcrhardt, .laeob... 

Eifien, Mrs. B 

Enriglit, Jamea 

Fnijo, A 

Farmer, Fredrick... 

Farrcll, Patrick 

Finluy, Jolin P 

FitU, Wiliiiim 

Fosguto, VVm. N... 

Frank, F. C 

French, M. D 

tiiiinmd, Louis 

Oartelmimn, Jolin.. 
tilcndcning, Jatiicj. 

Graves, J 

Graves, Silvester,... 
Gray, Henry . 
Gruwcll, M. L 
Gummcr, Siim'l P.. 

Garrigus, F 

Habicb, August.... 
Unnnibul, Wm .... 

Hart, L 

Hurgie, W. F 

Henning, W 

Hicks, B 

Holmes, P. B 

Hillobriint, P 

Hill, Mrs. M 

Hunter, A. B 

Jiiniison, S. I 

Joffory, Alciandor.. 
J(>nkin£, G. C. 
Johnaon, J. \V 
■luhnsun, Arebibald 

Keitli. P. G. 

Kelley, Thomas. 
Eenyon, James M.. 
Kineir, T ho 111 us 

King, E. T 

Kingsbury, "Wm.B. 



Miller.. 



Ohio ~ 

His«i)un.- 

California 

Spain 

Virginia 

Tennessee 

Illinois 

Missouri 

New York 

Georgia — 

Irelnnd 

Maine 

Ohio..... 

Scotland 

Maine 

N. Carolina.... 

England 

Scotland ■ 

California 

Kentucky 

Scotland 

New York 

Canada 

Vermont 

Maine 

N. Hampshire. 
Ohio 



Hotel keeper 

Blacksmith 

l>'armer 

Agent Wells, Fargo &Co. 
Farmer 



Davics MochineShop. 

Tin and sheet iron 

Merchant tailor ,. 

Meat market & dealer in 
Farmer ...[.--tnck, 



Santa Clara Tannery. 

Capitalist 

Farmer 

General merchandise. 
Farmer 



Sup'l Entcrprihu Mill & 

Miller [Lumber Co. 

Contractor and builder.... 

Merchant 

Farmer 

Merchant 

Saloon keeper 

Farmer 



Carpenter 

Farmer 

Groceries and dry good.').. 

Farmer 

Dry goods and clothing.. 

Parmer 

Saloon keener 

Boot and shoo maker 

Blacksmith 

Farmer and stock raiser.. 



Hassacbusctts 

Maine 

Ohio 

California 

Ireland 

N. Carolina... 

Maine 

Pennsylvania. 
MassaehuKOtta 

Delaware 

Ireland 

Kentucky 

Germany 



Ireland 

Spain 

Maryland..., 

Ireland 

Missouri 

Maine 

New York... 

Gcrmnny 

New York.., 

France 

Germany.... 
California ... 
Tennessee ... 



Missouri.... 

Indiana 

Maine 

Ohio 

Germany... 

England 

Germany.... 
Tennessee .. 
Germany... 

Canada 

New York.. 
Iowa 



Capitalist 

•I U5, of Peace, Notary, and 
Farmer.. ..[real est. br'kr. 



Phyoician, 
Farmer.... 



Paper manufacturer.. 
Dentist 



Virginia 

31aryland 

Pennsylvania. 
New York..._ 

Missouri 

Virginia 

Ohio 

Illinois 

Ohio 

Ireland 

New York 

Vermont 




1849 
ISflS 
1852 
1860 
1852 
1840 
1843 
1868 
1864 
1853 
1849 
1850 
1872 
1819 
1857 
1819 
18i>2 
184G 
1870 

1872 
1832 
1850 
1855 
1850 
1850 
1844 
18(18 
1840 

I'saa 

1850 
1856 
1854 

laoG 

1803 
1852 
1847 
18^4 
1864 
1840 
1849 
1850 
1853 
1852 
1857 
1849 
1856 
1862 
18.'i9 
1858 



Santa Clara. 



184!) 
1864 
1852 
18.63 
1853 
1849 
1845 



1851 



1850; " 

18521 " 

1852' 

1846 San Josf> 

laTli'Alviso 

1859;San Josu 

1872! " 

1873 



1849 
1863 
1863 
1862 
1861 
1851 
1855 
1854 
1856 
1850 
1872 
1869 
1857 
1875 



1849 
1819 
1856 
1853 
1849 
18^9 
1851) 
1871 
1849 
1836 
1868 
1864 



1859 



18G8 
1849 



1854 
1850 



1867 



1852 
1850 



1875 
1.840 



1856 



Santa Clara. 



1862 



1873 
1850 
1849 
1853 
1853 
1853 
1862 
1851 



1854 



1858 
1872 
1869 
18GD 



1850 
1849 



1853 
1849 
1861 



1860 
186G 



lent. 



San Joaf' 

Santa Clara. 



San Jose 

Santa Clara, 



120 
165 
GOO 

860 
226 
82J 
137 
2(12 
280 
186 



160 
859 

165 

lie 

166 

539 
10 
75 

119 

120 



123 
140 



242 
169 



31 

800 



78 
157 



208 

2 

193 

340 

350 

80 

178 

101 

342 
160 



304 



160 

100 



70 
191 

180 

567 
15 



Kingston, F- B 

Enowlcs, J- 

£rahenberg& Co... 

Lflcderieh, .1, N 

Laederich, Sirs. L.. 

Lamory, E 

Lapham, C. U 

Lawrence, A, C 

Lawrence, Thomas. 
Leibe, Herrmann... 
Leigh, DoliciuH.... 

Leonard, H, M 

Lenox, E. H 

Lillick, Henrv 

Love, Chus. W 

Loveland, C. C 

McComas, C L 

McComaf, Rush 

McCubbin, Rob't.. 

McKeadney, H 

Madnn, A 

Manning, Samuel.. 

Men^.cl, R... 

Merrill, A 

Millikin, Samuel,... 

Morchmd, B. C 

Morrison, Sorn'1.,,.. 
Moulin, James B.. 

Norwood, J. G 

Oliver, Warner 

Pancuast, Franklin 

Parker, J. S 

Parker, W. C 

Pnterson, Archib'd 

Payne, J. F 

Peebels, Gary 

Pierce, James P.... 

Bancy, Felix 

Bced, John 

Rousseau, E 

Rutledge, B. F 

Buckcr, W. D 

St. Mary's Acad'y.. 



St. Palais, R 

Snnor, Miohael., 
Sontcr, Isaac N., 
Shannon, John 0... 

Shore, T, B 

Silva, Frank 

SIntler, J. A 

Stuphcna, H. W, 
Stevenson, H. H.... 
Stewart, G W... 
Sullivan, Wm. L... 
Swopi", 5r., Jacob... 

Sykes, L. W 

Tantao, M , 

The Bank of Santa 

Clara Co 

Theuerkauf, F... 
Thompson, I. N 
Thorn, E. V , 



Santa Clara., 



Tobin, John F... 
University of the 

Pncific 

Varsi, A , 

Walter, G. B 

Walkins, B. F... 
Warburton.H. E... 
WaUon, W.O... 
Wileox, I. A...., 
Wilcox, William... 

Willett, L 

Williams, D, & T.. 
Wilson, W. B.. 
Withrow, A. A. 

Wolf, M 

Wolfe, W. H.... 
Woodhams, A. R... 
Worthinglon,C.H. 



ansilES. 

Crocker baker 

Farmer 

Fredericksburg Brewery.. 

Butcher 

Fruit farm 

General niorcbandi«o 

Farmer 

' and railroad agent 
■ and fruit raifer 

Breivor 

Parmor 

Banker 

Farmer 



' [neer. 

Architect and Civil Engi- 

Hardwaro merebnnt 

Farmer, .[gen'l hardware. 
DIr. in stoves, pumps, and 

Well borer 

Farmer 

Superint'ent Gas Wrjrka.. 
Mnfr. ofcandy and cigars. 

Farmer 

Fruit grower 

Farmer 



England 

Estab. In 1808, 
Franco 



ant 
(sSliU 

185G 

1852 



Tin 
nnu 
UCd. 



roii-omci. 



Rhode Island., 
MuEsacbusetls. 



Gormany 

England. 

Mtusachusetis, 

Kentucky 

Germany 

Now Jer.'cy 

New York 

Virginia 

Scotland 

Ireland 

Now York 

Missouri 

Prussia 

Ohio 



Minor. 

Farmer . 



and capitalist. 



Teacher. 
Farmer . 



Branch of Convent ol 

Notre-Dame 

Butcher 

Farmer 



" and wagon maker. 

Produce dealer 

Farmer 



Lumber merchant,.. 
Court-house oflicial 

Farmer 

Saloon keeper 

Farmer 

Mail mESBcngcr 

Farmer 



Banking-.. 
Capitalist 



Cashier Bank of Santa 

Clara Co 

Variety and fruit store.... 



Pres. Santa Olnro College 

Farmer 

Fruit grower 

Physician 

Farmer 

Fruit grower 

Farmer 



Farmers and stock raisers. 
Editor Santa Clara Edio. 

Harness maker, etc 

Farmer , 



Missouri , 

N. Hampshire 

England 

Maine 

Ohio 

New Jersey. , . 
Kcntuckj- 



Scotland 

New Y'ork 

Kentucky 

Penn.sylvnnia.. 

Kentucky 

Massaohusotls. 

Kentucky 

Virginia 

Missouri 



1860 



1852 
1641) 

1856 
1850 
1850 



1864 
1874 
1867 
1818 
1849 
1850 
1847 
18G3 
18G1 
1853 
1850 
1850 
1849 
1869 
1853 
1852 
184U 
1850 
1862 
1849 
1860 
1862 
1867 
1859 
1832 
1855 
1851 
1866 
1850 
1858 
1864 
1853 
1852 



France 

Ohio 

Maine 

Ohio 

Missouri .., 
Portugal.., 
Missouri..,. 

Ohio 

Missouri,.., 
Tennessee , 



Kentucky 

Massachusetts. 
Holatein 



Germany.., 
Michigan.., 

New Y'ork. 
Ireland 



Ohio 

New York 

England 

Massachusetts, 

New Y'ork 

England 

Maine 

New York 

Ent;land 

Indiana 

Pennsylvania. 



Now York 

N. Carolina... 



Santii Clara, 



1869 
1889 
186G 
I8fi7 



San Jofij...., 

San til Clara. 



1856 
1874 

18G8 

1B5G 
1849 

1863 
18G1 
185;i 
18G0 

i'857 

'1855 
1852 
1850 



1870 
1873 



1859 
1852 
1858 



1650 



1872 
1853 
1852 



1868 
1849 



1832 

1849 

1850 

1853 1866 

1860 

1851 

1849 

1857 

1857 

1855 

1860 

1850 

1850 

1852 



1851 
1852 

1849 

1852 
1866 



1852 
1847 
1847 
1863 
18G7 
1859 
1850 
1849 
1869 
1857 
1849 
1849 
1849 
1850 



1855 
1850 



1857 
1855 
1862 
1861 



1862 



1852 
1850 



1862 



1860 
1849 



1860 
1850 
1850 



San Jos5 

Santa Clam, 

Alviso 

Sanls Clara. 



Alviso 

Santa Clara. 



Snn Jofe 

Siinta Clara. 



San Jose 

Santa Clnni, 



San JosO, 



Santa Clara. 



San Josf 

Santa Clara. 



San Jose 

Santu Clura. 



ft. a 

Icro. 



93 
2 

163 

128 

63 
162 

40 

60 
114 
85 
88 
240 



160 
111 

40 



31 
160 



60 
127 

95 

117 
121 

260 
204 



147 
146 
40 

160' 

269 



116 
202 
460 

1099 



125 
110 



00 

95 

111 

1723 



103 



102 
GO 



iL£.BliLS»SX«^ XOWXrSESlP. 



Baker, Thomas.. 

Bliven, E. A 

Biihhnan, John.. 

Boso.Geo. 11 

Cardiff, Thomas 

Casey, L. C 

Cilka, John 

Gonroy, John...., 
Coonuy, John..., 

Daves, B.J 

Ducoicy, Adulpli... 

Dunn, John 

Fleurv, Catherine.. 

Groy,'W. L 

Haines, A, G 

U ami 1 tun Bro^.. 
Hamilton, Frank.., 
Uarwnod, D. M. 
Howii'j, John.,... 
James, Charles... 

JetlVica, John 

Kennedy, Mrs. J.F. 

Lclievio, A. E 

La Monlrungc, Wni 
McAhcc, John... 



Almadcn Township 



New Almadcn 

Alniaden Townshi] 



Now Almudeii.. 



BDSIHBS8. 



Hotel (Eight Mile House) 

Saloon 

Road Master 

Farmer and stock raiser... 

" and fruit gmwor. 

" and slock raiser... 

Veterinary surgeon 

Chicken ranch 

Farmer and fruit grower. 

" and team.sler 

■ 1 

Farmers and vineyard,... 

Farmer 

Vineyard (Lone Hill) 

Farmer 

" and cimtractur..- 



iiTiTm. 



England 

New York,. 
Germany.... 



(S, Suuei Itunch). 



Bu Ichor. 



Canada East, 

Ohio 

Germany 

1 reland 



Ohio 

France 

England 

Ireland 

Kentucky 

Maine 

California 

Ohio , 

Sow York.. .. 
Connecticut... 

Now York , 

Knghind 

Pennsylvania. 

France 

New York , 

Canada 



(«;uu 



1853 
1852 
1843 
1848 
1851 
1849 
1857 
1853 
1850 
1852 
1875 
1853 
1660 
1855 
1850 



1854 
1851 
1862 
I85J 
1849 
1850 
1860 
18G3 
1866 



■vim 
aat 



1858 
1868 
1813 
1850 
1800 
1853 
1868 
1653 
1852 
1852 
1875 
1861 
1873 
1875 
1852 



185-1 
1861 
1853 
1874 
1849 
1850 
1868 
1863 
1800 



FOST-OFflOE. 



Los Gatos.... 

San Jose 

N. Almadcn. 

San Jose 

Pioneer 

San Josij 

Los Outos.... 

Pioneer , 

Lus Gatoi.— 

San Joi6 

N. Almadcn 

San Jose , 

Los Oatos.... 
San Jose 

Los Gatos.... 
Santa Clara. 
Lus Gatos.... 

San Jose 

II 

N. Almadcn. 



ED.et 
itm. 



31C 

127 

84 

174 

175 

200 

1,000 

4 

148 



40 

172 
320 
220 

ii:o 

119 
305 
630 
IGO 



McCarthy, Joseph.. 
McGlinn, James.... 

Murphy, James 

Norton, John 

Nickels, Tlieodore... 

Parker, L. F 

Philhon, Wm 

Riely, P 

Redmond, Andrew. 
Richmond, Frank... 

Ross, Daniel 

Itandol, Jas B 

Sehofiold, C 

Schwceh, A 

Scale &, Plynn 

Shannon, Thomas... 
Shermantine, J. S... 

Skinner, D. E 

Sku.^e,N 

StanQeld, John 

Stan field, llobcrt.... 

Waters, Wm. E 

Welsh, John 

Williams, Edw.W. 
Zinglcr, Thomas.... 



Almadcn Township 



New Almadcn... 
Almadcn Township 

New Almaden 

Almadcn Township 



Now Almadcn 

Almudon Township 



BDS1HKS5, 



Farmer(St.Patrick's B'ch 



" and slock raiscr..- 
Teamstcr and cuntraclor.- 
Parnier 

" and stock raiser... 

" nnd fruitgrnwur.. 
STngr. N. Almadcn Mines 
Farmer and fruit grower. 

Clerk 

Stone quarry 

Farmer 

II 

It 

Hotel (New Almadcn).... 
Farmer 



Ireland. 



Pennsylvania. 

Illinois 

Prussia 

Ohio 

Ireland 



Austria 

Ohio 

New York 

Germany 

Penn.sylvaiiia.. 
Estiibl'ed 1873 

Ohio 

Maryland 

Now Jersey.... 
Canada West,. 
Ireland. 



Canada East.. 

Ireland 

Pennsylvania. 
Germanv 



loSuia 



1852 

1SG4 

1874 

1852:1854 

1862(1670 

1850|l850 



am 
loCg. 

1853 
1666 
1874 



1853 
1808 
1854 
1850 
1862 
1670 
1850 
1849 



1800 
18G8 
18.34 
1652 
1801 
1870 
1868 
1850 



]849[18GG 
184911857 
185211853 
165911859 
1868 1800 
18G4ll864 



1803 

1854 
1852 

1866 



1863 
1871 
1858 

1868 



San Josi. 



Palchon ..... 

San Ju$6 

Los Gatos— 

San Josi' I 

N. Almaden 
Santa Claru.. 
San Jos<^ 



N. Almaden, 

San Jos6 

N. Almadcn. 

San Josu 

Los Gatos... 

San Jose 

N. Almadcn. 



San Joi£. 



N. Almadcn. 
San Josi 



icra. 



160 

160 

40 

309 

820 
280 

157 
137 
104 



240 

803 

lOO 
150 
171 
233 
458 
240 

137 
147 

136 



exx-sfco 



■UL 



Anliiir, Gei). T..., 
It".!-;, VV. K 

i!.ai. 1,. F 

Kriitiiirin, Win 



H^il,'^'^. IJ. W 

Iliirj.'i^'i', Levi 

Ilurkliarl, U, Z -,, 
Jlurrelt,C 

Itiirruwc, W. H. , 

(;iifti>n, J.Vf 

Crnwii, (J. B 

Uiilli^n tli'08 

Di-jin, J , 

Dusllfi, C. H: 

Diirlnnd, .J.J 

Dowiij', John 

KiijollHirry, John., 

KuBiii;.!, Oi'orgc 

I'lirmer, E, H 



Fiirloy, C. K 

Piirninn,T 

I'orgiiMn & Bro 

I'ino, L 

PilKgunild Bros. 4 
Uinca 



T OIV XT S IS X X>, 



iBuna. 



Qiiroy.,.., 



SnnYiidro 

Gllroy , 




100 



Purmer 



Sun yitdro.. 

Gilniy ......'.' 

Sun Tiidro.. 
Gilroy 



FilKgwild, John H. 
FitiiKtrnId, M. A... 
FurluriK, Wm. N... 

Gniv, Miko 

Oiiibul, EtiKcno 

Huiinn, William..., 

Hnrbihurn, Wrn 

HIninun, A. G 

Hodgeg, P.C 

Hornor, J. Viin .. 

Hulor, D 

Hudson, Rov.T.J.P, 

Hunter, M. E 

Jones, H. S 

JohnBon, Cyprus.... 






Sbesp raiicr 

Livery, feed, nnd lulc »Ui- 
blf, uiid dc'iilcr in huy 
and grain 

Merchant 

Parmer , 

Editur Oilny AJraea/e... 

SiiniB Chiru Vnllrry Plnur- 
I ing .MilU _ 

Archili'ct 

j Farm or i 

Piiriiiurs I 

Furmer 

'Stugi- proprietor of Gilroy 
and BcriindiL Line 

'Carpenter und buSldor 

, Farmer 

■Cupitalist 

iCiirriai;e it wngun mukcr, 

Munufacton- of currifljjes, 
wagons, & farming im- 
plements, nl«o of Leed'a 
Potent Posl-Holo Dig- 
ger, Itighl* Tor Bnle,-. 

Fliysiciiin und surgeon.... 

Capiluliat 

Farmers 

Farmer 



■PennsylvaniiL. 1850! 185* Gilroy 

N. CoroliiiB....: 1853 18-58' " 

Mi^ouri 1&43 I84t»i i- 

,New York 186011850 San Yflidro.. 



Irelnnd IBoO.ieflB 

Iowa 18.59 lerili 

England 18-59,18(10 

Iowa 1875] 

Estubl'ed ISOll i 

Canuda ir8«4i|8'J8 

Indinna.- 'l84!l IglJl 

Miwouri 18.12.18.53 



Gilroy. 



SuQ Y^idro._i 



Livery, feed, nnd Bale slu- 

blea 

'Furmor 

Curpontor 

ISiiloon koepDr,.., 

ISheop ruifcr 

Lunibfr dealer 

Farmer 

,Con»t4iblc & Dop. ShtTifl". 

Lumberman 

Dentist 

Physicinn 

Catholic poster 

Joivelurand sUtionor 

Stock nuEcr 

Butcher 



Canada.-... 

Ohio 



Vermont 

Cunadu 

|N. Carolina.... 
Ohio 

"Wisconsin.... 



18R3'l8e3 Gilroy 

18&0|18G6 San YKidru,. 



184S'1853 
1850 1859 
1854'l8.5J 
18S2.1852 
180n 1803 



N. Brunswick. 1859 

Alobnma 'l8(J8 

Illinoif Iisrifi 

" 1854 

Missouri 16J9 



Eslabl'ed 1801 
Canada,... 



Tennessee 

Franco 

Indiana 

England. 

New York 

N. Carolinii.,.. 

Indiana 

Pennsylvania.. 

Ireland 

Masfachusctls 
Missouri 



Gilrnv. 



1870J 

18CG, 
1854 
iS.J-jl 



370 
25 

■>oo 



COO 
260 



382 
130 
600 
800 



ISSBDCL 



icsncs. 



iimtn. 



113 
160 




800 
163 
20ti 



I,00<] 
1 1,W0 



2UU 
10 

450 



Jobnsim, Jas. B 

Kiddny, Billy 

I Li'gler, Simon 

IrfnoMn, Jlatlhew- 
Li'wi>, Abralnini,,-.] 
L(iv.', JIuritt ! 

j 31artin, Mrs. Juliiui 
Mnriin, J. C 

Muze, S. SI 

.AlcClure, C. J 

McDulTep.HenrvL 
Morov, H. C. ..'...,.. 
Oberdeener, Wulf... 

Oldham, T.S 

Ousley, .Mrs. Klecia 

O'Toole.L 

Paine, John 



Oilroy 



San Yfidro— , 
Giltoy ,... 



Via Tbal 



■ i'.'""^--:';!'l'lier ..Majn^ lHUn,l&J9 QUrov' 

te" ^'i'i^^r^- iKngland 1942 1848 .. ^' 

. William Tell House- ' . _ 

.'Fomily grocer I 

.'Slock dealur 

..Farmer 



San Joaquin 

Gilroy , 



Photpj, Koberi 31.-, 

Phul|)s, W. S 

Ren, Samuel 

Rea, Thomas ,. 

Beere Bros 

Rccvo, Henrj- 

Reeve, O, P. & B-.. 

Rhinehiirt. J. B 

Hiekotls, V- S 

Richl, A 

Robinson, Wm i ■■ 

|| Itnger-i, F. S | " 

; Rueker, J. s | ■' !"!,".",*.'!;!!!!',! 

, yarjrenl.J.r ,&BroflSargcntSlalinn 

i.Hlayton.R. G ;San Ysidro Itiinch. 

, Ismilli, Frank Gilroy 

1, Smith, James U ■ " „\\ 

.Spra«ue, A 

i.Tdf Bank of Gilroy 

. Thc.miu, T. R 

i:Tully, P. B 

■ Van Scliaick, 11. D. 

Warthen, Albert,.. 

Wnbb, A. C 

Wentz, C 

Weymouth, Jn*, L. 

Wh'itchurst, L. A... 

Wood, David 

Wood, Uriah 

Zuck, David 



{Editor California H'erkly 
Ltadrr , ,.,.. 

Dairy man ; 

lilncksiuith 

I Merchant., „ I 

; Physician 

Boi)k«'..||er 

Architect and builder 

Farmer 

Proprietor of Gilroy Hot 
Spring Stages; livery, 

sale, and feed aiablc 

Fflrmcr 



Swii//.rl»nd.,.. IW:! 18(13 

MtirylaiMi IfidH igiiO 

iNcw York _,,. 11^48 

I " ,-,.. 18.VJ I85H 
;N, Carolinn..„|I843 184^1 

Penn!ivlvuniii..'l874'lf-T6i 

lllinuid 184II'18.'>() 

Maine 18tl4:If(lU 

Wisconsin 1863 ISM 



New York 

Russia Poland, 
South Carolina 

Missouri 

Ireland 



San Vaidro 

Gilroy 



San Ysidro 



Dairymen 

.[Farmer and dairyman 

.Sheep raisers, 

.iHou^c and sign painter... 

. , Farmer 

,'Hri!\ver 

. Pr.ip. St. Charles Hotel.,, 

[UentisU 

.'Farmer 

j'Stouk raisers 

.Quicksilver miner 

■Merchant 

Parmer 

Physician 

Banking 

, Farmer 

.Vtlorney 

-McTcliant 

.Slock dealer and butcher, 

;H»rdivarc 

'Parmer 

I Baker 

Lunihernnin , 

Capitulisl 

jFarmer and stock dealer.. 
Farmer 



Missouri 

Ohio """"'. 



la-w 18(10 

1850 1808 
1850' 18G7 
185a 18i4 
1801:1851 



1630 
1662 
1863 

185;; 

I860 



isool 

1868 

1863 
1859 
1858 



Now York 

Ohio 

Wisconsin 

'Kf-nlueky 

iGerraany 

Kentucky 

Miuisachiisells. 

Missouri.- I 

N. HumijBhire.' 

Wisconsin ' 

Ma.qsachusolls . 

Arkansas 

Ohio,, 

OtganiKedl871 

Missouri 

Tennessee, 

New York 

Ohio 

Massuchu^ells. 

Germany 

Virginia 

Missouri 

Illinois 

New York ( 

Ohio 



18.'.;)'1863 
!1863|I86J 

1853) 

]6U0'l8l)U 
1840 1H60 
1853 18(17 
1840' 1874 
1860 
1852 
1840 
I860 



18i;4 
1874 
16G2 



1868 
1852 



Lm Hanoi 

Gilroy.,.., 



18f; 

1852 

18fi(l(Sar[;entSlirn 
18&4;Gilroy 



1874; 
18081 



1863! ■■ 

18581 ■' 

1652 " 

lfi-10 1861 ■' 

1861 1874 " 

184il!l850,Siin Ynidro... 
■1h:.1 I^^U-* Cilroy 

■|.si;i MA[t ■' 

iHi;i i8.>;' " '. 

'I85a[l864lSHn Felipe,,. 
lS49ll853lGilroy 






100 

2M 

I,2lXi 



240 



62 
000 

313 



f. 224 

400 
1,000 

U40 



20 



147 
10,000 



li)7 
-10 
101 



61 

2,000 

281 
760 



S^RSJMEOXa'T' ^O-^^rxffSjQCX^ 



Bniloy, D. B,.,„... 

Uniloy, Jofforson,,. 

Bernard, John 

Bovorly, FrnnkP., 

Bocksoh, Charles,, 

Boulwaro, J, W..., 

Bracher, Herman.. 

Briggs, Geo, H 

Brown, W. W 

JJryan, J. W 

Butb, B.T 

Bubb, Wm. H 

Barton, Joseph 

Charleston, Georgo. 

Olnrk, J. J 

ColliiiB, L. P 

Coon, H. P 

Coutta, Peter..*. 

Crittondon,Orrin... 

Dale, Edward 

Dale, Wm 

Dornberger, Lam'l, 

Dubbs, M 

Ducker, Charles 

Elliott, George 

Fell, J. J 

Fobs, Wm 

FranciB, Geo 

Frink, Daniel 

Pruhting, Wm 

Qnllimore, W 

Gartlomann, Dan'l. 
Gardner, Wni. H... 
Graham, Isaac N... 

Grant Brothers 

Greer, John 

Guth, Charles 

Hall, Nathan.^ 

Henderson, Walter 

Hong, D 

Hollenheck, J,C.-., 



Fremont. 



Farmer &roal oat, broker. 



Biiimr. 



Stay 
Fren- 



field, 
ont. 



Schooner and warehouse. 
Farmer 



Supervisor and farmer.,,. 
Farmer 



Ilotd. 
■mont. 



May field,, 

Fremont,. 



Capitalist 

Farmer 

M.D, and farmer 

Farmor 

'' nnd clergyman... 

" and stock raiser.. 



Grocoricsnnd liquors 

Architect and builder , 

Farmer , 

Teacher , 

Druggist and Postmaster. 
Farmer 



Parmorii 

Retired sen captain 

Farmer & warehouse kpr. 

ciork.,.!!;i!;!!;!!;!,"!!!;"" 

Farmer 



Tcnncflseo 

Ohio 

Alabama 

California 

Germany 

Kentucky 

Germany 

Mns.Hachusetts, 
Nova Seolia,,, 
Missouri 



ami 



cunt 
tsCe- 



18S0II862 
lajrillS.^O 
I85(i!l858 
I., 



Tennesaoo 

Scotland 

England 

Now York 

SwitKerhind.... 
Mnstacliusctts 

Tennessee 

Missouri 

France 

Germany 

Illinois 

Maine 

Connecticut 

New York 

Prussia 

N, Carolina.,,, 

Germany 

Vermont 

Kentucky 

Mnssnchusetis. 

Ireland 

Germany 

New York 

Scotland 

Now York 

Illinois 



18G0 

1852 1 1852 
I860' 1800 

1860 

1850) 16515 

1847) 

1850 1861 

1850 1851 

I860 

18.'i2 

1871 

1853 

1862 1672 



WST^fFICE. 



Mount. View 



Santa Clara.. 

Mayfiold 

Mount. View 



1862 
1871 



1874 

1862 

18.W 

1850 

1862 

1863 

18 

1SC4 

1849 

1867 

1852 

1847 

1854 

18.60 

1867 

1807 

1852 

1863 

18411 

1851 

IS52 

186'J 

18.54 

1870 



1875 
1862 
1850 

1854 

1864 

1871 

1875 

1808 

187 

186^ 

ISGO 

i'850 



1852 



1850 
1NC3 



186n 
18.54 



Mny field 

Mount. View 



Mcnlo Park,, 

Santa Clara-.l 
Mnylield I 

Mount. View 



Haylield , 



Jlenlo Park.. 
Mount, View 

May field 

Mount. View 
San Jo?e 

Santa tJlara,. 

Mount View 

May Held 

Mount. View 
Santa Clara.. 
May field 

Mount. View 



Ho. ot 
Ian. 

"227 
300 
40 

167 
lOQ 
82 

too 

20 
170 
120 
ICO 
220 

lao 

1,580 
157 
31 lO 

1,212 
KiO 
171 
200 
0112 
700 



700 



400 
167 
106 
318 
167 
163 
360 
250 
203 
174 

8G4 
320 



Hosmer, Stephen D, 

.Fenkins, Kvans 

King, Nathaniel..,. 
McCleary, Henry.., 

SlcLca, Donald 

Mayors, ChrtHlian., 

Mcreier, Jules 

Morkel, John.- ■ 

Millard, L. B 

Murphy, .Martin..,. 

Myrick, W, H 

Naunton, Robt 

Nowoll, W, A 

Pa^fe, Wnl 

Paul, Wm 

Paul, Win. P 

Peers, Alexander... 

Phelan, Alice 

Pitman, A. J 

Ponce, J, P 

Price, Mrs. S 

Prinnes, Flemcng,,, 

Rejigstorir, Henry.. 

Richord.ion, J 

Rob lea I Seuondcau,, 

Snyder, John 

Souza, William 

SpQulding, J, S 

Spedding, Mathias- 

Springcr, E^F 

Stierlin, C. C 

Swall, Peter 

Taylor, .S. P 

Towne, Peter 

Van Buren, C 

Walkinshaw, Robt. 
Wallis, Joseph S,., 
Waterman it Ladd. 

Wright, Wm 

Young, L- G 

Zaidu, Ramon dc...,' 



Fremont, 



milOCE. 



Mountain View. 
Fremont 



Farmer . 



May field. 
Fremont, 



Mayfleld. 
Fremont. 
Mayfleld. 

Fromunt.. 

Mayfleld,, 
Fremont,, 

Mayfieid.! 
Fremont.. 



iMayfield 

Fremont 



.Mnuntain View,. 
Maylield 

Fremont 

MayDeld 

Fremont 



Hotel and meat market,.. 
Farmer 



Saloon keej)er and farmer 
Farmor u[lU M.D 



Telegraph operator 

Farmer 

Physician 

Justice of the Peace 

Supervisor and farmer 

Farmer 

Lumber niorchant 

Farmer 

Blacksmith 

Farmer 

" & warehouse kpr. 



Fruit dealer 

Farmer 



Hotel, merchant ^Notary 

Livery stable [Public 

Dep. Sherin'& Constable. 

Farmer 

Atiorney-jit-law 

Hotel keepers 

Farmer 



finnit. 



Wkfa *h(n I 
ItSUU |g Cg. 



& Notary Public, 



MaBsachuseltB. 

Pennsylvania . 

MassacbuBelU. 

Indiana 

Scotland 

PennHylvnnia. 

France... 

Germany, 

New I'ork 

Ireland 

Ciilifuroiu 

Kneland 

Ireland 

New York 

Scotland 

Sweden 

ICnEland 

Ireland 

Missouri 

France 

Mexico 

Virginia 

Germany 

England 

California 

Indiana 

Portugal 

Maine 

England 

Mi,"souri 

.Switzerland ,.. 

Prussia 

Kentucky 

Maine 

New York 1858 

California 
Mocsachu setts. 184)1 
1852 

Maryland 1851 

Maine 1600 

Spain |1850 



1850, [Santa Clara., 

1840 1850 .Mount. View 

18eo;i860 

18113.1803 

1660.' 

1860; 1806 

1852 1S(M Mavliidd 

18li5,IH07|Moant.Viuw 

185ft )San Ju.=L. 

1814,jsr,0 Mount. View 

Nat- 1807 Jlaytltld 

1874 IK74 

18i;o:i804 

1860|l8[iR 

1H6(I 1H.-X1 

lS.50;IM(ii|''Mounl. View 

180ll'lSG0 Mavfield 

1801 IHIll .'Mount.View 

18J;i \n:.-l ,\tayfleld 

1864 IKOl: " 

1871 .^[.lunt.Vii'W 



Id. ol 
leio. 



1850 
1850 
1862 
1813 
18511 
J 847 
18-50 
1848 
1852 
I860 
1852 
165!) 
18-54 



Santa Clara.. 

l«-)OMouNt.Vieff 
1852) ■' 

18JlJMayDetd 

:Mount. View 

1803 
18fl8lMayncld 

'Mount. View 

l«.52i 
1852 
l.%4 



ISIIO 
I8-5H 
18.52 
1857 
IS.53 



1852 



Slay field 

Sluunt. View 
Mayfleld 

Mount. View 
Santa Clam,. 
Mnylield , 



2-10 
166 

140 

800 

r>o 
100 

100 
10,006 

303 
40 

30 
30 

100 
00 

320 

11!) 

026 

117 

800 

800 

1 

09 

00 

100 

21)7 

203 

4 



1,000 



321 

157 
10 



Bray, Frank, 



Cnrlor, Hascn 

Inglc-'on, Charles, .- 

Karr, John. 

Meads, J, W 

Ortley, Mrs, Almira 



AXiiViso ^oTW-jsrs^x^, 



Santa Clara Dealer in grain and prop, 

i Alviso Flouring Mills. 
Alviio Stage proprietor 

Fruit grower 

Clerk 

Farmer 



Missouri 

N. Brunswick. 

Maryland 

Ireland 

Maryland 

Pennsylvania,. 



'Stun 
oina 
IbSUU 



I8.>1 
1808 
18^50 
1862 
1868 



1858 



18-501 



Snnln Olora- 
Alviso 



Poguo, Thomas 

Shields, Murg. M... 

Wade, Chas. E 

Wade, Harry 

Wbitcomb, Octav,.. 
Wright, Wm.H.... 
Young, Charles W, 



Alviso ;.., 



Hotel keoperand farmer- 
Farmer and fruil grower. 

Denier in hay nnd grain,. 
Farmer and blacksmith... 

Saloon keeper 

'Farmer and stock raiser.. 



Delaware 

Pennsylvania. 

England 

Maine 

New York , 



lftl9 

18(;8 

18.50 

1850 
1853 
16-63 
1862 



Alviso 



95 

400 



26 

500 



110 



Baii:.x*i:Tivs xoiATirsin^- 



iin. 



Aii'ltri'tn, Alex 

Ay.rr, S. y 

HpUpw, Miclitifl. ... 

Hoyee, D. f^ 

Brailshiiw, JiwepL,.. 

i(iirnL.tl, W. J 

Cnrriuk, Jiilm 

Cb-iIc,W. D, iSon 

Clark, Chua 

Coi'per, JntncB H... 

Dnrliiig, E. W 

Di'niiun, J 

Evnns, J 

Gnlnos, W. S 

Grccnllirld,J.M.&D 

Himscn, Mnrlin 

HnrrU, N. R 

Hnrrieun, Thomas., 

Hiblmrd, D. C 

Hughr^, Micliiicl. ... 



Milpitiu. 



i«mn. 



...Parmer 



Wiigon ranker 

'BInckFmilli 

iFarracr 

|BuU'licrs 

Farmer 



Qcnoral merchandise. 
Former 



Fnrmcrs 

Former ■..■ 

Sheriff iind farmor 

Farmer 



IScotland 

ICanadn 

iNew York 

,Cunada 

iMisanuri— 

.'Scotland 

Michigan 

Ohio 

England.- 

SEnsfluchiiBctls. 

New York 

Ohio 

Kcnlucky 

Ireland 

Donmnrk 

Micliignn 

Ireland 

Nova Scotia..., 

Missouri 



IVkaa 
ItSUle 

1851 

180O 
1854 
1868 
t8Gl 
1850 
lB.il 
18117 



aogj rasT-ornoi. 



18.^2 
18J9 
18551 
1874 
1853 

185«| 

IS'ig 
18f.7 
1852 
185C 
1874 
1840 



Milpilns. 



1852 



1863 



lo.tt 



415 

ITjO 

811^ 

17(1 

4(10 

2 

100 

HO 

(10 
1104} 
775 
155 

84 
203 
COO 
1(10 
1'28 



JiickUn, William... 

JnnM, M. L 

Miller, S. J 

Murphy, Mary B... 

O'Toolc, John 

O'Toolc, Wm 

Polton, Juhn 

Pomcrny, Hiram... 

Rankin, Ali-j: 

Itiiymond, Fionk... 
Sherman, John T... 

Shormiin,S. J 

Smith, Mr». T. L... 

Snibloy, Wm 

Wnlsh, Robert 

Wollor, Ellen 

Wcller, J. E 

Wells, D 

Wigmore, W. H.... 
Windsor, John 



usnnci 



MilpiliB- 



Former 



Stock raiser 

Farmer 



Blncktmith 

Former 



Blacksmith 

Former 



England 

.Missouri 

Indiana 

California 

Cunada 

Ireland 

Indiniia 

Scotland 

Minncsnto 

Mii^bigan 

New York 

Kentucky 

Micliigan 

Canada 

Pennsylvania, 
New Jersey... 

Micliignn 

Canada 

England 



CUM 

loEuu 

18,50 
18110 

isei 

i'854 
1854 
ISfi'J 

1857 
18.17 
1874 
1854 
18.V.I 
1850 
1858 
18,jli 
ISO'J 
1850 
ISriH 
18(18 
1863 



Vbia 
aou 
IsDx 

18(10 



Mt1)iitns. 



i8.5;i 
18511 



1867 






115 
KHt 

80 
584 

tm 

1110 
180 

100 
400 

KIO 
4U5 

800 
!)5 
060 

■2m 



J 



S'O'E^Xl'S^V vovrxTsscsi^. 



Ballard, J. H [Burnett. 

Blanch, " 

Brewer, D. G " 

Cnirnfl, James " 

Caywuod, J. W " 

Dunne, Catherine... " 

Esworthy, E. A " 

Fiflbcr, Tliomaa " 

Fitzgerald, Gregory " 

Foley, Ellen " 

Hobin, Ann " 

Kirbj, John " 

Maginotti, J.JJ " 



Former... 



Capitalist. 
Farmer... 



iiTmn. 



New York 

England 

New York 

Ireland 

Ohio 

Canada 

England 

L. CHlifornia... 

Canada 

Ireland 



Italy.... 



time am) 
tsSuU Id Co. 



185211854 
18.50 1850 
18fi5|l8-JU 
18C4;i8G7 
18571 ISiJS 
165111S5I 
ISBlllSfiS 
1 SIC i 184(1 



1853 
1855 
1864 
1851 
1850 



1853 
1858 
18^4 
1855 



Sherman.. 

BurnelL.. 
Sborman.. 
liurnett... 
San Jo?6.. 
Burnett... 



Sherman.. 

Burnett. . 
18(J9rShermon. 



385 

100 

80 

200 

m 

10,833 
204 
780 
314 
00 
112 
211 
174 



McKis9ick,T. &F. 

Mooro, Andrew 

Murphy, Dan 

Murphy, N. C 

U'Donncll, D 

Owen, J. M 

Perry, Henry 

Phoglpy, David 

Pliegley. Jiimes F... 

Piatti, C 

StevenE|0 

WiHi3, Mrs. E. L... 
Wilson. G.W 



Burnett. 



iinTiTi. 



Formers 

Farmer 



Hotel keeper.. 
Farmer 



" and fruitgrower.. 
Hotel k[>r. and genl. mdso. 

Physician 

Farmer and stock raiser.. 



Pennsylvania. 

Germany 

Canada 

California 

Ireland 

Vermunl 

England 

Missouri 

Italy 

Vermont 

New York 

California 



via 
ami 
loSUila 



1840 
1840 
1844 

'VsiiV. 



Via 
timt 
Id Go. 



1855 

18117 
1845 

'l'808 



1352il853i 
18riO|l8(i0j 
187011870' 
187011870 
1850 1 1850 
18-i2!lSr,7 
185t!il8'i4 



Burnett... 

San Josi^.. 
Slicrman.. 

I Burnett.., 

Sherman.. 

I Burnett .. 

Sherman, 
ilturnctl... 



It.il 
Icra. 



4.50 

38 

23.000 

8G& 

40(1 
200 
100 
244 

10» 
250 
700